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Latest items for Afghanistan

Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"But the Afghan government since the collapse of the Taliban regime has included many conservative Islamists and former warlords whose attitudes about women are similar to the Taliban. Sima Simar, the head of Afghanistan's Independent Human Rights Commission, says the gains for women since 2001 can easily be overturned and have rarely been implemented in rural areas where most Afghans live" (para. 19-20).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LR-DATA-1

"UNICEF, the United Nations children's agency, says only half of school-aged Afghan girls now go to school, and that only one out of five girls under 15 are literate" (para. 23).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"It is in this environment that Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has refused to put a bill to a parliamentary vote that would prohibit violence against women -- despite years of domestic and international focus on the legislation" (para. 28).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Reflecting on the growing popularity of such beliefs in Herat, Khorsand says 'it makes no difference for women in Afghanistan if the Taliban exists or doesn't exist.' 'The Taliban's way of thinking about women is the way many people are thinking in Afghanistan,' she says. 'A lot of Afghans have traditional ways of thinking and they believe the talk of the Taliban. Unfortunately, much of their way of thinking is against the rights of women' (para. 15-16). "Most imprisoned Afghan women have been jailed for so-called 'morality crimes,' such as leaving an abusive husband or demanding to marry a man of their own choosing" (para. 25).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"To be sure, Khorsand says there have been important advances for Afghan women since 2001 -- including language in the Afghan Constitution that enshrines the right to education and to work" (para. 17).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"A study issued in January by UN Women and the nongovernmental gender equality group Promundo found that 80 percent of Afghan women have experienced domestic physical violence" (para. 26).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

"The 2018 Women, Peace, and Security Index by Georgetown University and the Peace Research Institute of Oslo ranks Afghanistan as the second-worst place in the world to be a woman. Only Syria was ranked worse. That study notes that only 16 percent of Afghanistan's workforce is female and that half of all Afghan women have four years or less of education" (para. 21-22).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"That study found that only 15 percent of Afghan men think women should be allowed to work outside of their home after marriage, and that two-thirds of Afghan men think women already have too many rights in Afghanistan" (para. 27). "'Sadly, those particular women who bravely met under the guise of the sewing circles and who were writing stories and poems secretly, most of them have left the country or have stopped writing because they are not happy with the situation,' Lamb tells RFE/RL. 'One of them, a poet called Nadia Anjuman, was actually killed by her husband because he wasn't happy about the fact that she was speaking publicly...more
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATC-DATA-6

"Ghani has appointed only five women to a 37-member council tasked with trying to pave the way for direct peace talks between his government and the Taliban at a time when the Taliban refuses to talk directly with the Kabul government. Only 10 women were invited to be part of a 240-strong delegation for so-called "all-Afghan talks" with the Taliban, and even then, the first round of those talks was canceled over reported complaints by the Taliban over the composition of the delegation" (para. 29-30).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: GP-DATA-2

"Ghani has appointed only five women to a 37-member council tasked with trying to pave the way for direct peace talks between his government and the Taliban at a time when the Taliban refuses to talk directly with the Kabul government. Only 10 women were invited to be part of a 240-strong delegation for so-called "all-Afghan talks" with the Taliban, and even then, the first round of those talks was canceled over reported complaints by the Taliban over the composition of the delegation" (para. 29-30). "Lamb tells RFE/RL that although women have fought bravely for their rights since the collapse of the Taliban regime in late 2001, many are now...more
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DTCP-LAW-1

"Khalida Khorsand, a 35-year-old rights activist from the western Afghan city of Herat, is skeptical about Taliban claims that it has dispensed with its strict rules against girls' education and women working. The militant Islamic group made the declaration in the midst of recent peace talks with U.S. envoy Zalmay Khalilzad aimed at bringing an end to the long U.S. military presence in Afghanistan" (para. 1-2). "In rural areas of Herat Province, where Khorsand worked for years to help women who are victims of domestic violence, Khorsand says she has seen disturbing signs of support for the punishments doled out by the Taliban under its strict enforcement of Islamic Shari'a...more
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2

"That study found that only 15 percent of Afghan men think women should be allowed to work outside of their home after marriage, and that two-thirds of Afghan men think women already have too many rights in Afghanistan" (para. 27).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"The 2018 Women, Peace, and Security Index by Georgetown University and the Peace Research Institute of Oslo ranks Afghanistan as the second-worst place in the world to be a woman. Only Syria was ranked worse. That study notes that only 16 percent of Afghanistan's workforce is female and that half of all Afghan women have four years or less of education" (para. 21-22). "UNICEF, the United Nations children's agency, says only half of school-aged Afghan girls now go to school, and that only one out of five girls under 15 are literate" (para. 23).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

"To be sure, Khorsand says there have been important advances for Afghan women since 2001 -- including language in the Afghan Constitution that enshrines the right to education and to work. Women are members of parliament and can be seen on television, competing in sports, and performing in concerts in Kabul" (para. 17-18).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"'Music concerts are absurd because they are forbidden,' Jami tells RFE/RL. 'Music is bad for the mind, memory, and even human psyche. When a girl performs in front of strangers, the whole society is corrupted' (para. 14). "To be sure, Khorsand says there have been important advances for Afghan women since 2001 -- including language in the Afghan Constitution that enshrines the right to education and to work. Women are members of parliament and can be seen on television, competing in sports, and performing in concerts in Kabul" (para. 17-18).
Dec. 8, 2019, 8:22 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, AOM-DATA-2

"Nearly two out of three Afghan girls are married when they are teenagers or younger. On average, they are sent by their parents into arranged marriages between the ages of 15 and 16" (para. 24).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

". . . decisions are 'firmly centered within the family unit' and that male household members are 'likely to have greater or final say'. But it finds that women and other family members are also involved in the process" (para 38).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-DATA-2

"UNICEF's available data suggests at least 15 percent of all Afghan girls are married off by their families before they are 16. About one-third of all Afghan girls are married by the time they turn 18 the legal definition of a child under the Child Protection Act signed into law by Afghan President Ashraf Ghani in March." (para 12). "Hussaini says there is no doubt that underage Afghan brides are more common than child grooms. But in a country where 42 percent of surveyed households have at least one family member who was married before the age of 18" (para 14).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-5

"The impoverished family scrimped and saved to gather the double dowry the bride's father demanded to marry off his daughter to a boy who was too young to support his own family" (para 7). "Hussaini says UNICEF has recently been registering about 200 Afghan boys each month, aged 11 to 17, as they return to Herat Province from Iran where they've been working to help support their families" (para 21).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, PW-PRACTICE-3

"Reluctantly, after his mother also promised he could marry a second wife of his own choosing when he was older, Mohammad agreed to the wedding -- consent required from him for the marriage to be valid under Islamic law" (para 6).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

"Mohammad Wali was just 12 years old when his widowed mother began arranging his marriage to a 24-year-old woman from their village in Ghazni Province . . . 'Your father is dead and you are my only son,' she recalls telling him. 'If you are killed or something happens to you, all of our property will be divided up by your uncles. Your sisters will get nothing.'" (para 1-4).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"But the Afghan Civil Code is not the only source of law regarding child marriage in Afghanistan. Islamic law and customary rules or local tribal traditions also govern child marriage and sometimes contradict the national laws . . . According to Islamic law, a marriage is not valid if the individuals are either unwilling or too young to understand the implications that marriage entails. But Islamic law is vague about a specific age that is considered old enough for 'understanding,' leaving the question up to different interpretations by local religious leaders. Hussaini says pronouncements by various local mullahs across Afghanistan, particularly in rural areas with high illiteracy rates, have been...more
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"Afghanistan's Civil Code sets the marriage age at 18 for males and 16 for girls. It says a father can agree to allow his daughter to marry at 15. There are no circumstances under Afghanistan's national laws in which a child under 15 can be legally married" (para 29). "According to Islamic law, a marriage is not valid if the individuals are either unwilling or too young to understand the implications that marriage entails. But Islamic law is vague about a specific age that is considered old enough for "understanding," leaving the question up to different interpretations by local religious leaders" (para 33). "Hussaini says pronouncements by various local mullahs...more
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

"Mohammad Wali was just 12 years old when his widowed mother began arranging his marriage to a 24-year-old woman from their village in Ghazni Province . . . But his mother insisted on the marriage to ensure that she and Wali's two teenage sisters would not become street beggars -- a possibility she feared because of local inheritance customs for widows who don't have a male heir" (para 1-3).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-2

"UNICEF's latest research on the issue, a 2018 study funded by the UN child-protection agency, found that many Afghans have a 'deeply economic and transactional view of marriage.' It says this attitude 'provides ongoing impetus to use child marriage as a coping mechanism' for poverty and the devastation of war" (para 17).
Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Guyana, Iceland, Iraq, Italy, Kazakhstan, Laos, Latvia, Macedonia, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, South Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tanzania, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

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Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Rep, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Montenegro, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

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Oct. 16, 2019, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-3

"Afghan law allows trafficking victims to seek restitution; there were no reports any victims did so. Afghan law allows foreign victims to remain in Afghanistan for at least six months. Authorities reportedly identified some foreign victims in Afghanistan but did not report if they received this benefit" (68). "The penal code provides that authorities shall not prosecute trafficking victims for unlawful acts their traffickers compelled them to commit, including 'moral crimes' and the possession or use of fraudulent travel documents" (68).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The 2017 Law to Combat Crimes of Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking, including bacha bazi. The law prescribed penalties between five and eight years’ imprisonment. These penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with those for other serious crimes. Aggravating factors increased the maximum sentence to between 10 and 15 years and the imposition of the death penalty if exploitation for armed fighting resulted in the victim’s death. Article 510 of the new 2018 criminal code criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking, including bacha bazi. Article 511 prescribed penalties of five to 10 years’ imprisonment for trafficking offenses...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Afghans continued to both voluntarily return and be deported from Iran and Pakistan, and traffickers had exploited some of the returnees in Iran and Pakistan. While international organizations noted that traffickers specifically targeted these returnees for forced labor upon return to Afghanistan, the government did not screen returnees for trafficking or refer them to services" (67-68). "Afghan law allows trafficking victims to seek restitution; there were no reports any victims did so. Afghan law allows foreign victims to remain in Afghanistan for at least six months. Authorities reportedly identified some foreign victims in Afghanistan but did not report if they received this benefit" (68). "The penal code provides that authorities...more