The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Afghanistan

Nov. 9, 2017, 9:05 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: IM-DATA-1

"Although the study recognises that the rates of death among children under five have more than halved in LDCs since 1990" (para 5). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:04 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

"Women in LDCs are also more vulnerable to unemployment than men – 84.1% to 71.4%" (para 9). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:04 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"While the prevalence of women using modern contraceptives in LDCs rose from 15% in 1994 to almost 34% in 2015, it lags well behind the global average of 64%" (para 9). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia ...more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:03 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"the fertility rate is falling – from 6.2 children in 1985-90 to 4.3 in 2010-12 – it says LDCs need to do more to anticipate the approaching phase of accelerated development" (para 5). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, ...more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:03 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"As of 2010, more than half of the women in LDCs aged 20-24 were married before they were 18; in some countries, the figure was 70%" (para 8). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia (TPJ - CODER ...more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:02 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"As of 2010, more than half of the women in LDCs aged 20-24 were married before they were 18; in some countries, the figure was 70%" (para 8). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia (TPJ - CODER ...more
Nov. 8, 2017, 10:50 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1, RCDW-PRACTICE-2

"The Moroccan version of a burqa, which costs between 50-60 dirhams (about 5-6 euros), is different than the long Afghan dress with an eye screen"(para 4)
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Virginity is highly prized in conservative Afghan society, seen as a symbol of modesty and family pride. Girls who are deemed to have had sex before marriage face public shame, divorce and even death" (para 6).
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-1

"Describing what happened to some girls who were accused of having sexual experiences before their wedding night, she said, 'In most villages, a girl who is found to not be a virgin is tortured, her clothes torn and hanged over her head, and she is forced to ride back-to-front on a donkey back to her parents’ houses, and one of her sisters is taken [for marriage] along with their bride price'" (para 10).
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Aisha was married to her cousin when she was just 15 years old" (para 1).
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-2

"Six months after the wedding, her new husband summarily divorced her, claiming that she had not been a virgin when they married" (para 1). "'At first my husband said he trusted me because we had grown up together, but six months after we married he wanted to take another wife. When I told my father that my husband was arranging another marriage, the arguments began. Then my husband told everyone that I wasn’t a virgin when we got married'" (para 3). Aisha's husband divorced her on accusations that she wasn't a virgin when they got married (TPJ - CODER COMMENT). "In the absence of blood [on the wedding night], the ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-3

"I don’t want to get married again because if you are 14 years old and divorced, you have the same status as a widow. You won’t be valued like a virgin is valued" (para 5).
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, LRW-PRACTICE-2

"Women who lose their virginity as a result of sexual assault can expect little sympathy. That was the experience of Madina, who recounted how she was attacked as a young girl after, she had been sent to stay with her aunt. 'During the night, my cousin raped me,' she told IWPR. 'When my aunt discovered this fact, she changed my [torn] clothes, warned me to keep this secret and told me that she would kill me if I told anyone'" (para 14-15).
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DSFMF-LAW-1

"'Article 427 of Afghanistan’s criminal law regarding fornication states that losing one’s virginity before marriage is a serious offence and the ‘criminal’ should be punished for it,' said Ashraf Baskhtyari, head of the Forensic Science Centre, an NGO that opposes forced virginity examinations. 'In addition, according to articles 444 and 449, police are permitted to seek the help of experts to solve cases in which there is a need for a medical examination; therefore, the police force of Afghanistan sends the ‘criminals’ accused of sexual crimes to a forensic centre'" (para 30). "'Even when a person is accused of fornication, the case must be proved by strong evidence as well ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1

"Describing what happened to some girls who were accused of having sexual experiences before their wedding night, she said, 'In most villages, a girl who is found to not be a virgin is tortured, her clothes torn and hanged over her head, and she is forced to ride back-to-front on a donkey back to her parents’ houses, and one of her sisters is taken [for marriage] along with their bride price. Afterwards, the girl’s family kills the girl because of the insult to their honour'" (para 10).
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-3

"Although President Ashraf Ghani has promised to ban [virginity] tests as part of official procedure, they are routine for women accused of anything that falls under the vague category of so-called moral crimes" (para 8). "'Those accused experience extreme mental trauma,' Subhrang said. 'We have traveled to different provinces and seen victims who were imprisoned after such examinations for their ‘crime’ of not being a virgin'" (para 12). “In addition, according to articles 444 and 449, police are permitted to seek the help of experts to solve cases [of 'moral crimes'] in which there is a need for a medical examination; therefore, the police force of Afghanistan sends the ‘criminals’ ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-4

"Six months after the wedding, her new husband summarily divorced her, claiming that she had not been a virgin when they married" (para 1). "Virginity is highly prized in conservative Afghan society, seen as a symbol of modesty and family pride. Girls who are deemed to have had sex before marriage face public shame, divorce and even death. Women and girls also face invasive and degrading forced virginity tests to determine whether their hymen is intact. Although President Ashraf Ghani has promised to ban these tests as part of official procedure, they are routine for women accused of anything that falls under the vague category of so-called moral crimes" (para ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 8:07 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

"Aisha was married to her cousin when she was just 15 years old" (para 1). "My aunt came to our house one day to ask for my sister’s hand in marriage for her son" (para 15).
Oct. 20, 2017, 10 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Widows are among Afghanistan’s most vulnerable groups. They sometimes are stigmatized as morally loose because they frequently don’t have male guardians to protect them. They are also more visible in public, since when they work it is often outside the home" (para 12).
Oct. 20, 2017, 10 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SMES-DATA-2

"After her husband’s death, she received a pension of 7,500 afghanis ($120) a month. But a year later that money stopped, she said—the government isn’t sure why—forcing her to ask for her brothers’ help to feed her children" (para 3). "The Afghan Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs, Martyred and Disabled says it pays benefits to the roughly 80,000 war widows who have registered to receive them. Wives of fallen soldiers, policemen or other government employees are entitled to a regular stipend equal to their spouses’ salaries, while widows of civilians killed in attacks are permitted 5,000 afghanis a month. But the number receiving benefits is far below the actual number ...more
Oct. 20, 2017, 10 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-DATA-1

"Three decades of conflict in Afghanistan have produced a vast population of war widows. Last year was the deadliest for Afghans since the U.S. invasion in 2001, with 2,690 civilian men and around 5,400 troops killed" (para 4). "The Afghan Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs, Martyred and Disabled says it pays benefits to the roughly 80,000 war widows who have registered to receive them" (para 7). "'We don’t have exact number of widows in Afghanistan because we don’t have data, and many widows are not registered with our ministry'" (para 10).
Oct. 20, 2017, 10 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1

"Three years [after the death of her husband], she met Mohammad Ali. 'He asked to marry me and said he would take care of my children'" (para 16).
Oct. 20, 2017, 10 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-2

"After her husband’s death, she received a pension of 7,500 afghanis ($120) a month. But a year later that money stopped, she said—the government isn’t sure why—forcing her to ask for her brothers’ help to feed her children" (para 3). "The Afghan Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs, Martyred and Disabled says it pays benefits to the roughly 80,000 war widows who have registered to receive them. Wives of fallen soldiers, policemen or other government employees are entitled to a regular stipend equal to their spouses’ salaries, while widows of civilians killed in attacks are permitted 5,000 afghanis a month. But the number receiving benefits is far below the actual number ...more
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-2

"Like many women, I always thought that after university and finding some financial stability, I would marry and have children. I guess the fact that I grew up in a progressive and supportive family made me forget that the experiences of Afghan women are unlike those of many women around the world. I forgot, for a second, that as a woman unless you can have children, your education, career, and marriage are considered meaningless. I was not prepared for feeling that in the eyes of my community, my only worth as a woman is to bear children in the end"(para 2)."Women experiencing infertility must bear the brunt of societal norms. ...more
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-2, ATDW-PRACTICE-3, ATDW-LAW-3, ATDW-DATA-1

"Infertility or childlessness in Afghan society is considered a taboo and almost always women are blamed for it. In fact, often people only take the woman to the doctor when problems with infertility arise. Sometimes, men marry a second or third wife to get children, without checking their own health, because it is assumed that the problem must be with the woman"(para 6)."In Afghanistan, when a man has reproductive system issues, the family will do anything to sweep the story under the rug. But, when a woman can’t conceive, the story is discussed everywhere, in her presence and absence. Moreover, the husband gets all the sympathy from the family members ...more
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MABFC-DATA-1

"Like many women, I always thought that after university and finding some financial stability, I would marry and have children"(para 2)."Conceiving soon after marriage is highly glorified in Afghan society. Women continuously quit their jobs or drop out of schools because of the societal pressure to prove they are able to have babies soon after marriage.A young woman I know planned her wedding exactly during her ovulation cycle to make sure she gets pregnant shortly after her wedding"(para 7-8)
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Infertility or childlessness in Afghan society is considered a taboo and almost always women are blamed for it. In fact, often people only take the woman to the doctor when problems with infertility arise"(para 6)."She had to beg her husband to get himself tested because Afghan men firmly believe that it is always the woman with fertility problems. In Afghanistan, when a man has reproductive system issues, the family will do anything to sweep the story under the rug. But, when a woman can’t conceive, the story is discussed everywhere, in her presence and absence. Moreover, the husband gets all the sympathy from the family members for marrying a barren ...more
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

"In many parts of Afghanistan, infertile women are abused in their homes, deprived of their inheritance, sent back to their parents, ostracized or have their marriage terminated"(para 9)
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MISA-PRACTICE-1

"Even though I had support from my husband and my in-laws, there was always someone reminding me that my marriage had no meaning without children. There was always someone giving me that look of pity. There was always someone bringing up her topic of pregnancy time and again in front of me; perhaps, wanting either to stimulate my motherly instincts or make me envious of her pregnancy. Suddenly all my accomplishments were meaningless because I had 'failed' in the one task considered central to women’s identities.'I didn’t marry you so you would give me children,' my husband told me.His words helped me overcome the mental torture some people around me ...more
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1, ERBG-DATA-3

"Conceiving soon after marriage is highly glorified in Afghan society. Women continuously quit their jobs or drop out of schools because of the societal pressure to prove they are able to have babies soon after marriage"(para 7)