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Latest items for Afghanistan

April 10, 2018, 11:10 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATC-DATA-6

According to the Institute of Inclusive Security, Afghanistan launched their national action plan in 2015 and it expires in 2022 (MB-Coder Comment).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Around 5,000 Afghan girls were enrolled in school in 2001. In 2011, there were 2.4 million, a 480-fold increase...In 2009 approximately 22% – around 446,682 – of female students were considered longterm absentees. The percentage of girls in universities is increasing year by year. In 2006, girls formed 20% which reached to 22% in 2007 and 24.8% in 2009" (Pg 6). "The total number of students in grades 1-12 is 7,381,331 and 2,749,553 of them are girls" (Pg 7). "'We still have 1.2 million girls of school age who do not have access to schools,' said Catherine Mbengue, UNICEF Country Representative in Afghanistan (Pg 8).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"Separate classes and facilities with different courses regarding house management, child development and growth, are provided for married girl student" (Pg 13).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Teachers usually teach for half a day then the other half of the day is spent doing household chores and taking care of their own children" (Pg 17).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"In June 2013, the Afghan Parliament considered and rejected a measure that would have made it illegal for men to marry girls under the age of 16. Opponents believed the measure went against Islamic principles" (Pg 12). "Civil Law has determined 18 years of age for men and 16 for women as the minimum age for marriage" (Pg 14).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: BR-PRACTICE-1

"The period between pregnancies for one third or women is 18 months or less and 24 months for half of the women" (Pg 14).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"There needs to be cooperation between NGOs, local governments, and the Ministry of Education to provide greater access to education to the rural areas of Afghanistan. Because security is still a problem in Afghanistan, families are unwilling to send their children far outside their villages to receive education. Even families fortunate enough to have automobile transportation still fear sending their children, particularly their daughters, away from the village to go to school. When educational and higher educational opportunity is concentrated in larger cities, the graduating professionals are generally unwilling to take their degrees and move to rural villages to teach. Afghanistan already has a shortage of female teachers, and getting ...more
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

"The government of Afghanistan has failed to meet its obligations under Article 101 of the CEDAW because: it has failed to protect female Afghani school children from gender motivated violence; early forced marriage makes it impossible for many Afghani women to pursue education; and the lack of female teachers makes meeting the needs of Afghani women impossible due to the historic, cultural rules regarding intermingling of the genders" (Pg 6).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LR-DATA-1

"The percentage of girls in universities is increasing year by year. In 2006, girls formed 20% which reached to 22% in 2007 and 24.8% in 2009. Only 26% of all Afghans, and only 12% of Afghan women, are literate. The majority of girls don't stay on after fifth grade and nine out of ten 15 year old girls are illiterate" (Pg 6-7).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"In each school, there is a council in which the parents of students, local elders and managers of school are members. The goal of this council is to encourage enrolment of children, particularly girls and monitoring the provision of the education" (Pg 7). "'We still have 1.2 million girls of school age who do not have access to schools,' said Catherine Mbengue, UNICEF Country Representative in Afghanistan (Pg 8). "As part of its achievements, The High Commission on Elimination of Violence Against Women has prepared its 5-year strategy and has conducted study trips and seminars on child and forced marriages which lead to the endorsement of prohibition of the Eradication ...more
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"Articles 43 to 47 state that education is the right of all citizens and education up to bachelor level is free of charge. In addition, secondary school education is considered mandatory and the government must establish balance in and improve education for, women and nomads and eliminate illiteracy. The government also supports the cultural activities. Article 3 of Education Law also states that 'citizens of Afghanistan have the right to education without any discrimination'" (Pg 7).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"NAPWA has a target of 30% women in governmental positions until the end of 2013. To reach this goal, the government will take steps towards positive CEDAW/C/AFG/1-2 34 11-64682 discrimination in employment, increasing number of female teachers, increasing capacity-building programs for women, emphasizing women's education, providing educational scholarships for women and organizing awareness programs on the role of women in their communities" (Pg 15-16). "Many families think that government and NGOs are not suitable environments for women to work. Many women working in the governmental sector work as teachers. Teachers usually teach for half a day then the other half of the day is spent doing household chores and taking ...more
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-1

"'[I]f you aren't married in Afghanistan, that's seen as a problem. If you aren't letting your girls go get married, this will be a shame for your family. Finally, Afghans typically have very large families, from four to sometimes 12 children, even 15. How can they feed their families with only one male in the household working while the rest of the family is spending? Many families decide to just let their girls get married instead of go to school because they don't have enough resources to feed them'" (Pg 13-14).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"To address the critical need for qualified teachers, USAID helped train more than 74,000 Ministry of Education (MoE) teachers, of which 31 percent were female. USAID's CBE project has allowed approximately 105,000 students (65 percent female) to attend schools in remote locations, which were beyond the reach of MoE schools. In 2012, USAID's work on teacher training, community-based education, literacy training, and textbook printing were largely shifted to direct, on-budget assistance to the MoE" (Pg 16). "To improve rural numbers, Save the Children has implemented high school training programs so girls can become teachers right after graduation" (Pg 17).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: GP-DATA-3

"As part of its achievements, The High Commission on Elimination of Violence Against Women has prepared its 5-year strategy and has conducted study trips and seminars on child and forced marriages which lead to the endorsement of prohibition of the Eradication of Child and Forced Marriage Protocol" (Pg 13).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"The government of Afghanistan has failed to meet its obligations under Article 101 of the CEDAW because: it has failed to protect female Afghani school children from gender motivated violence; early forced marriage makes it impossible for many Afghani women to pursue education; and the lack of female teachers makes meeting the needs of Afghani women impossible due to the historic, cultural rules regarding intermingling of the genders" (Pg 6). "Afghanistan’s government has violated Article 1650 of the CEDAW, which mandates the right to freely choose a spouse and bans the betrothal of children, by allowing the continued practice of forced marriage of young girls. In doing so, the government ...more
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"According to Afghanistan laws, registration of marriages and divorces in courts are voluntary" (Pg 13).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"'When I go to classes, only half of my energy is spent on my studies because the other 50% is spent in dealing with harassment from the male students. The teachers do not interfere because they do not want to get involved. You cannot complain to the principal because they say there are not these problems at our university, and I often want to leave. I am so tired of it'" (Pg 10).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: NGOFW-PRACTICE-1

"There needs to be cooperation between NGOs, local governments, and the Ministry of Education to provide greater access to education to the rural areas of Afghanistan" (pg 5).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-2

"18-year-old Rahmaniya reports that her brother threatens to stab her to death or throw acid in her face if she continues to go to school" (Pg 9).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"After SaharGul's father died, she went to live with her stepbrother, Mohammed. Despite her hard work, Mohammed's wife resented the girl. At age 13, she was sold for over $5,000 and had to move hundreds of miles away with her new husband, GhulamSakhi. Refusing to consummate the marriage, Sahar would be drugged by her mother-in-law and raped by her husband. Facing physical abuse and torture, she was made to live in the cellar, bound, tied, and sleeping on the floor" (Pg 14).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-LAW-1

"In June 2013, the Afghan Parliament considered and rejected a measure that would have made it illegal for men to marry girls under the age of 16. Opponents believed the measure went against Islamic principles" (Pg 12).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-DATA-1

"The average age of marriage is 17.9 for women" (Pg 13).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ASR-DATA-1

"Women represent 16% of lecturers in Afghanistan state universities with only 419 of 2,539 lecturers being women" (Pg 15).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"After SaharGul's father died, she went to live with her stepbrother, Mohammed. Despite her hard work, Mohammed's wife resented the girl. At age 13, she was sold for over $5,000 and had to move hundreds of miles away with her new husband, GhulamSakhi. Refusing to consummate the marriage, Sahar would be drugged by her mother-in-law and raped by her husband. Facing physical abuse and torture, she was made to live in the cellar, bound, tied, and sleeping on the floor" (Pg 14).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

"There needs to be cooperation between NGOs, local governments, and the Ministry of Education to provide greater access to education to the rural areas of Afghanistan. Because security is still a problem in Afghanistan, families are unwilling to send their children far outside their villages to receive education. Even families fortunate enough to have automobile transportation still fear sending their children, particularly their daughters, away from the village to go to school. When educational and higher educational opportunity is concentrated in larger cities, the graduating professionals are generally unwilling to take their degrees and move to rural villages to teach. Afghanistan already has a shortage of female teachers, and getting ...more
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Afghanistan Human Development Report (2007) shows in many marriages, the girls are under 16 to 6 years old and some of the marriages are done without the consent of the girls and boys. Most of these marriages prevent girls from their civil rights such as education" (Pg 13). "From the total of 1940 registered cases within the Ministry of Women‟s Affairs during 2006-2009, 30% of the marriages occurred at an early age" (Pg 13).
April 7, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-5

"After SaharGul's father died, she went to live with her stepbrother, Mohammed. Despite her hard work, Mohammed's wife resented the girl. At age 13, she was sold for over $5,000 and had to move hundreds of miles away with her new husband, GhulamSakhi. Refusing to consummate the marriage, Sahar would be drugged by her mother-in-law and raped by her husband. Facing physical abuse and torture, she was made to live in the cellar, bound, tied, and sleeping on the floor" (Pg 14). "'Amina', aged 12, was forced to marry and bear a child so that her brother could receive the dowry" (Pg 14).
March 29, 2018, 10:36 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: PW-DATA-1

The percentage of women who were married or in a union and whose husband had no additional wives was 93.1%. The percentage of women who were married or in a union and whose husband had one additional wife was 6%. The percentage of women who were married or in a union and whose husband had two or more additional wives was 0.4%. The percentage of men who were married and had two or more wives was 2.9%. The percentage of married or in union men aged 15-49 who had two or more wives was 2.9%. This information was extracted from a 2015 DHS survey of Afghanistan, and compiled by Professor ...more
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

"The sport took off, growing from 340 registered youth and adult female players in 2006 to over 2000 players today" (para 29).