The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Afghanistan

Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Guyana, Iceland, Iraq, Italy, Kazakhstan, Laos, Latvia, Macedonia, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, South Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tanzania, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

1.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Rep, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Montenegro, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

1.0more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-3

"Afghan law allows trafficking victims to seek restitution; there were no reports any victims did so. Afghan law allows foreign victims to remain in Afghanistan for at least six months. Authorities reportedly identified some foreign victims in Afghanistan but did not report if they received this benefit" (68). "The penal code provides that authorities shall not prosecute trafficking victims for unlawful acts their traffickers compelled them to commit, including 'moral crimes' and the possession or use of fraudulent travel documents" (68).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The 2017 Law to Combat Crimes of Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking, including bacha bazi. The law prescribed penalties between five and eight years’ imprisonment. These penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with those for other serious crimes. Aggravating factors increased the maximum sentence to between 10 and 15 years and the imposition of the death penalty if exploitation for armed fighting resulted in the victim’s death. Article 510 of the new 2018 criminal code criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking, including bacha bazi. Article 511 prescribed penalties of five to 10 years’ imprisonment for trafficking offenses...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Afghans continued to both voluntarily return and be deported from Iran and Pakistan, and traffickers had exploited some of the returnees in Iran and Pakistan. While international organizations noted that traffickers specifically targeted these returnees for forced labor upon return to Afghanistan, the government did not screen returnees for trafficking or refer them to services" (67-68). "Afghan law allows trafficking victims to seek restitution; there were no reports any victims did so. Afghan law allows foreign victims to remain in Afghanistan for at least six months. Authorities reportedly identified some foreign victims in Afghanistan but did not report if they received this benefit" (68). "The penal code provides that authorities...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Afghanistan, and traffickers exploit victims from Afghanistan abroad. Internal trafficking is more prevalent than transnational trafficking" (68). "Traffickers exploit men, women, and children in bonded labor—a form of forced labor by which the traffickers offer loans to vulnerable people and manipulate the debts to coerce the workers into continued employment. At times, traffickers exploit one worker’s initial debt to entrap other family members, sometimes for multiple generations. There are entire Afghan families trapped in bonded labor in the brick-making industry, predominately in eastern Afghanistan and in carpet weaving countrywide. Most Afghan trafficking victims are children...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Afghanistan does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. These efforts included investigating some allegations of official complicity in trafficking, establishing five new Child Protection Units (CPUs) to prevent the recruitment of children into the Afghan National Police (ANP), and partnering with an international organization to finalize and publish standard operating procedures (SOPs) for victim identification and referral to care. However, the government did not demonstrate overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period. (....) Authorities continued to refer the majority of trafficking cases to mediation in lieu of criminal prosecution and penalized sex...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"The high commission reported identifying 434 potential trafficking victims in 2018, compared to 476 identified in 2017; NGOs expressed concern about the accuracy of those figures" (66).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"The public and private health sectors are equally popular as sources of modern contraception in Afghanistan. Most users get pills and condoms from the private medical sector (mainly pharmacies), while the public sector is more often the source for female sterilization, IUDs, and injectables" (103).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LO-DATA-3

"Seventeen percent of women independently own a house and another 10% own land, while almost half of the men own a house and about a third own land" (251).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SAB-DATA-3

"The median duration of breastfeeding in Afghanistan is 21 months; that is, half of children are breastfed until age 21 months (Table 11.3). The median duration of exclusive breastfeeding is 1.5 months, and the median duration of predominant breastfeeding (i.e., the period in which an infant receives only water or other non milk liquids in addition to breast milk) is 3 months" (187).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SAB-DATA-1

"About two-fifths (41%) of infants were breastfed within 1 hour of birth, and 9 of 10 began breastfeeding within 1 day of birth (91%)" (185).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: BR-PRACTICE-1

"Ever-married women want 5.6 children, on average, while men want 6.2 children" (91).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Only 5% of women make decisions alone about their own health care, while 44% report that their husbands make the decisions for them" (251). "Forty-one percent of currently married women who receive cash earnings reported deciding for themselves about the use of their earnings, while one third reported that they decided jointly with their husband (Table 15.2.1, Figure 15.2). Twenty-three percent of women reported that their husband decides how their earnings will be used. In couples in which both women and men earned cash, 65% of women reported that they earn less than their husbands and 8% report earning more (Table 15.2.1)" (252). "Among married men who receive cash earnings,...more
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IM-DATA-2

"Boys are more likely than girls to die in childhood. The gender gap is most pronounced during the first month of life (28 deaths per 1,000 live births among boys and 21 deaths per 1,000 live births among girls)" (129).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IM-DATA-1

"In the 5-year period before the 2015 AfDHS, the neonatal mortality rate was 22 deaths per 1,000 births, meaning that one of every 45 children died during the first month of life. The infant mortality rate was 45 deaths per 1,000 live births; that is, one in every 22 children died before their first birthday. The under-5 mortality rate was 55 deaths per 1,000 live births, meaning that one of every 18 children died before reaching their fifth birthday (Table 8.1). Four-fifths of all deaths in the first 5 years of life occurred during infancy, and two-fifths occurred during the first month of life" (128).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Marriage is universal in Afghanistan; by age 35-39, only 1% of women and men have never been married" (61).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3

"Women are more likely to work if they are divorced, separated, or widowed than if they are married (21% versus 11%). There is no relation between men’s marital status and employment (Table 3.5.1 and Table 3.5.2)" (34). "Only 13% of currently married women are employed as compared with 97% of currently married men" (251).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-DATA-1

"The median age at first marriage for women and men is 18.5 years and 22.9 years, respectively" (61).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"The current total fertility rate in Afghanistan is 5.3 children per woman" (77).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"Eight in 10 women who seek help ask their own family for help and about one third (34%) ask their husband’s family for help (Table 16.14). The next most common source of help is neighbors (18%). In Afghanistan, women who seek help to stop the violence are unlikely to seek help from doctors, police, or any other civil or social organization" (280).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"Boys and girls are equally likely to have their births registered and to have a birth certificate" (11).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-DATA-1

"Three percent of women and only 1% of men are widowed or divorced" (31).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"In Afghanistan, 57% of males age 6 and over have ever attended school, almost double the 31% of females (Tables 2.12.1 and 2.12.2). Only 4% of women and 10% of men have completed secondary school or gone beyond secondary school. The median number of years of schooling completed for women and men is 0.0 and 1.6 years, respectively" (12). "Sixty-nine percent of boys and 50% of girls age 7-12 attend primary school (Table 2.13). The net attendance ratio drops in secondary school: only 50% of boys and 25% of girls age 13-18 attend secondary school" (13). "The gender parity index (GPI), which is the ratio of female to male attendance...more
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"Eighty percent of women and 72% of men believe that a husband is justified in beating his wife in at least 1 of 5 specified circumstances, particularly if she goes out without telling her husband (67% and 61%, respectively)" (251). "Among ever-married women who had experienced spousal physical violence in the past 12 months, 26% reported experiencing physical injuries" (273). "Ever-married women who have experienced physical violence since age 15 most commonly report their husbands as perpetrators of the violence. Ninety-four percent of ever-married women who have experienced physical violence since age 15 reported their current husband as a perpetrator and 3% reported a former husband as a perpetrator. Other...more
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The main reasons for males dropping out of school are the need to work (44%) and the need to help at home (15%). Among females, 30% dropped out because their parents did not send them to school, while 19% dropped out because they got married" (13).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IMSTD-PRACTICE-1

"Seven percent of ever-married women have experienced one or more acts of sexual violence by their spouse: 6% have been physically forced to have sexual intercourse with their spouse when they did not want to, 5% have been physically forced to perform other unwanted sexual acts, and 4% have been forced with threats and in other ways to perform unwanted sexual acts" (277).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MABFC-DATA-2

"The median birth interval in Afghanistan is 28.4 months" (77).
July 23, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"The MoPH has scaled up health service delivery in Afghanistan through its Basic Package of Health Services and Essential Hospital Services, which includes more than 2,200 health facilities in all 34 provinces (MoPH 2010). However, information on whether women can access these services is important. According to the 2015 AfDHS, 89% of Afghan women reported having one or more problems in accessing health care for themselves. The most commonly reported problem was not wanting to go alone (70%), followed by distance to a health facility (67%), getting money for treatment (67%), and getting permission to go for treatment (51%) (Table 9.13)" (142).