The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Afghanistan

Sept. 26, 2020, 4:34 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRCM-LAW-1, LRCM-LAW-2, MURDER-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-2, ATDW-LAW-5, DSFMF-LAW-1, DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-2

“N. v. Sweden (no. 23505/09) (20 July 2010): The applicant, an Afghan national having an extra-marital affair with a man in Sweden, maintained that she risked social exclusion, long imprisonment or even death if returned to Afghanistan. Her applications for asylum were unsuccessful. The Court found that the applicant’s deportation from Sweden to Afghanistan would constitute a violation of Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment) of the Convention. It noted that women were at particular risk of ill-treatment in Afghanistan if perceived as not conforming to the gender roles ascribed to them by society, tradition and even the legal system. The mere fact that the applicant...more
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-DATA-2

"In Afghanistan a third of girls marry before the age of 18" (8).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRCM-PRACTICE-2

"Research by the UN found that very few reported cases of violence against women were prosecuted. The vast majority of cases either resulted in no action or were resolved through mediation, sometimes without the victim’s consent and often offering her no meaningful relief.2F The negative experiences women have in the justice system deter many other women and girls from reporting violence" (2).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: GP-DATA-2

"In addition, many Afghan women justifiably fear that a peace agreement may not mean peace for them—especially because of the struggle they have faced to be included in the discussion" (1). "Afghan women’s rights activists have long feared their rights could be a bargaining chip–and one easily surrendered–in peace negotiations with the Taliban. They have fought for years for a place at the table as negotiators–and been almost entirely rebuffed. And with the Afghan government and other Afghan opposition politicians so far excluded from US-Taliban talks, women’s participation has not advanced" (1-2). "US-Taliban negotiations have focused on US troop withdrawal, and whether the Taliban will pledge not to provide a...more
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"The Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW), made assaulting a woman punishable by three to five years in prison. It made child marriage a crime for the first time, making those responsible for such marriages subject to two to five years’ imprisonment. But the government has not taken meaningful steps to enforce the law" (2). "Under Afghan law, the minimum age of marriage for girls is 16, or 15 with the permission of the girl’s father or a judge. In practice, the law is rarely enforced, so even earlier marriages occur" (8).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Under Afghan law, the minimum age of marriage for girls is 16, or 15 with the permission of the girl’s father or a judge. In practice, the law is rarely enforced, so even earlier marriages occur" (8). "An education official told Human Rights Watch that the government is developing a pilot education program for girls in three districts in Nangarhar province that has both low girls’ education participation and high rates of child marriage.18F In April 2017, the Afghan government launched a national plan to end child marriage.19F But there has been little progress in implementing the plan. Given the government’s poor track record of implementing laws and policies designed...more
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"Research by the UN found that very few reported cases of violence against women were prosecuted. The vast majority of cases either resulted in no action or were resolved through mediation, sometimes without the victim’s consent and often offering her no meaningful relief.2F The negative experiences women have in the justice system deter many other women and girls from reporting violence" (2-3).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-4

"In July 2018, a new policy was announced by the Ministry of Public Health that promised to bar government health workers from engaging in the abusive practice of forcing women and girls to undergo invasive and medically meaningless vaginal and anal exams to determine whether they are ‘virgins.’ ‘Virginity examinations’ are a routine part of criminal proceedings in Afghanistan. When women or girls are accused of ‘moral crimes’ such as sex outside of marriage, police, prosecutors, and judges regularly send them to government doctors who conduct examinations of the genitals that purport to provide information about the individual’s sexual history. The reports from these examinations are treated as fact by...more
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LR-DATA-1

"Only 37 percent of adolescent girls are literate, compared to 66 percent of adolescent boys" (3).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Human Rights Watch estimated in 2013 that half of all women in prison and about 95 percent of girls in juvenile detention in Afghanistan were arrested on ‘moral crimes’ charges" (8).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Under Taliban rule, Afghan women and girls suffered shocking rights violations, including denial of education and freedom of movement" (1).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DSFMF-LAW-1

"Zina is a crime under the Afghan Penal Code and is punishable by 5 to 15 years in prison" (9).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"The Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW), made assaulting a woman punishable by three to five years in prison. It made child marriage a crime for the first time, making those responsible for such marriages subject to two to five years’ imprisonment. But the government has not taken meaningful steps to enforce the law" (2-3).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Under Taliban rule, Afghan women and girls suffered shocking rights violations, including denial of education and freedom of movement. Today, the armed group’s views on women have moderated slightly but remain highly repressive. For example, the Taliban now call for ‘education for all’ but in areas currently under their control they generally prevent girls from studying beyond puberty" (1). "Afghan government and international donor efforts since 2001 to educate girls have significantly faltered in recent years. An estimated two-thirds of Afghan girls do not attend school.3F As security in the country worsens and international donors disengage from Afghanistan, progress made toward getting girls into school has stalled. Under Afghan law,...more
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"An estimated two-thirds of Afghan girls do not attend school" (3). "Around 3.5 million children are out of school, 85 percent of whom are girls. Only 37 percent of adolescent girls are literate, compared to 66 percent of adolescent boys.4F " (3).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"In 2009, then-President Hamid Karzai signed legislation that dramatically expanded the list of abuses against women that constitute criminal offenses, and set tough new punishments" (2).
Sept. 21, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"An estimated 87 percent of Afghan women experience abuse in their lifetimes" (2).
Sept. 12, 2020, 3:32 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1

"The mean BMI for a male (18+ years) was 22.3 while for a female (18+ years) was 23.7 in 2016."
Sept. 7, 2020, 7:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, D R Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Palestine, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: ISSA-SCALE-1

2.0more
Sept. 5, 2020, 5:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Bahrain, Brazil, Central African Rep, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kuwait, Laos, Lebanon, Lesotho, Papua New Guinea, Russia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Uganda, Zimbabwe
Variables: AOM-SCALE-3

3.0
Sept. 5, 2020, 5:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Bahamas, Belarus, Brazil, Brunei, Central African Rep, Colombia, Cuba, Djibouti, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gabon, Laos, Lesotho, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Uganda, Zimbabwe
Variables: AOM-SCALE-2

1.0
Sept. 5, 2020, 5:01 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Cuba, D R Congo, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: AOM-SCALE-1

2.0more
Sept. 2, 2020, 6:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-3, VOTE-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-2

"An April report by the International Foundation for Electoral Systems on violence against women in elections noted growing use of social media to discredit and humiliate women candidates; social barriers to women voters, particularly in rural areas; and high rates of sexual harassment and violence against women in Afghan public life" (para 14).
Sept. 2, 2020, 6:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"Throughout the year, Afghan women’s rights groups and other civil society activists called for broad representation of Afghans in the talks and preserving human rights protections, including constitutional guarantees on women’s equality, in any settlement" (para 2).
Sept. 2, 2020, 6:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"Afghanistan’s attorney general indicted the Afghan Football Federation (AFF) president, Keramudddin Karim, on multiple counts of rape, sexual assault, and harassment of female players dating to 2017. FIFA, football’s global governing body, issued a lifetime ban on Karim, and fined him 1 million Swiss francs (about US$1 million). However, as of October, Karim, a former governor, had not been arrested" (para 13).
Sept. 2, 2020, 6:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"In July, following numerous allegations of sexual harassment, coercion, and assault in ministries, the Afghan government formed a special unit within the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) to investigate reports of sexual harassment and assault against women in public institutions" (para 14).
Aug. 31, 2020, 6:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

“[Fawzia] Koofi writes in her memoir that she saw him beat her mother badly, tearing out chunks of her hair. But Koofi's mother loved him. This was the way in Afghanistan. Her mother was dignified, strong, yet at the same time she believed that women obeyed their husbands. When wives failed to please their husbands, they had earned a beating” (Para 34). With the expectation for women, both from men and often for themselves, to accept a beating if they “[fail] to please their husbands”, there seems likely to be at least a significant social taboo against reporting domestic violence (BC - CODER COMMENT).
Aug. 31, 2020, 6:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-3

“[Fawzia] Koofi, [a female presidential candidate], was the 19th child out of her father's 23 children. Her mother was her father's second wife” (Para. 32-33). It’s important to note this was in the 70’s, although polygyny is still allowed in modern Afghanistan under Sharia Law (BC - CODER COMMENT).
Aug. 31, 2020, 6:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

“[Fawzia] Koofi writes in her memoir that she saw him beat her mother badly, tearing out chunks of her hair. But Koofi's mother loved him. This was the way in Afghanistan [in the 70's]. Her mother was dignified, strong, yet at the same time she believed that women obeyed their husbands. When wives failed to please their husbands, they had earned a beating” (Para 34). “While her mother was pregnant with [Fawzia] Koofi, her father took a seventh wife, a 14-year-old. That depressed her mother terribly, and her pregnancy was troubled. ‘She was pale, sick and exhausted’, Koofi wrote. Her mother prayed she would give birth to a boy. After...more
Aug. 31, 2020, 6:42 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1

“Afghanistan was changing, and in ways that a 16-year-old girl who was once free to express herself didn't like. With so many male soldiers [of the Mujahideen] around, it seemed smart to her family to make Koofi cover herself with a burqa… She recalls seeing glamorously dressed female news anchors taken off the air and replaced by "dowdy women in scarves" (Para 56). This indicates that dress code standards changed back towards traditional Sharia Law requirements once the Mujahideen took back control of Afghanistan (BC - CODER COMMENTS). “[Fawzia] Koofi believes that in the years since her win in 2005 to her current campaign, life for women in Afghanistan has...more