The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Afghanistan

Jan. 12, 2018, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

"The sport took off, growing from 340 registered youth and adult female players in 2006 to over 2000 players today" (para 29).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

"Afghanistan does have an eight-team women’s league competition that began in 2014" (para 24).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

"In 2005 the AFF organized a women’s football tournament with eight teams participating" (para 9).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:09 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-LAW-1

"During this time period, ultraconservative interpretations of Islamic law meant women faced heavy restrictions on their freedoms...They could not appear in public without a male blood relative and were generally banished from public settings, to be neither seen nor heard lest they be punished" (para 6). The time period referred to is when the Taliban controlled Kabul and established the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan (CODER COMMENT-BCT).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:09 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"During this time period, ultraconservative interpretations of Islamic law meant women faced heavy restrictions on their freedoms, including being banned from working" (para 6). The time period referred to is when the Taliban controlled Kabul and established the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan (CODER COMMENT-BCT).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:08 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Women were publicly beaten and executed for breaking Taliban-imposed laws" (para 6).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Because it’s a kind of tradition in Afghanistan when women turn 17 or 18 they should get married and start a new family life" (para 18).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DACH-LAW-1

"During this time period, ultraconservative interpretations of Islamic law meant women faced heavy restrictions on their freedoms, including being banned from...accessing adequate health care" (para 6). The time period referred to is when the Taliban controlled Kabul and established the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan (CODER COMMENT-BCT).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:06 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Because it’s a kind of tradition in Afghanistan when women turn 17 or 18 they should get married and start a new family life" (para 18).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"During this time period, ultraconservative interpretations of Islamic law meant women faced heavy restrictions on their freedoms, including being banned from...pursuing an education" (para 6). The time period referred to is when the Taliban controlled Kabul and established the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan (CODER COMMENT-BCT).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-2

"Khalida’s mother picked up right where she left off, forming a girls’ football club at her school in 2004 and campaigning for other schools to establish clubs" (para 8).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

"Khalida helped lay the foundations for the future of women’s soccer in Afghanistan, captaining the national team and rising within the administrative structure of the country’s football federation. But in a country still recovering from the oppressive rule of the Taliban, a woman coming to prominence in such a male-dominated sphere was upsetting too many people to ever fly under the radar. Afraid for her own safety, afraid for the safety of her family, Khalida left Afghanistan in 2011 when she was 23 years old" (para 2). "'Society was very closed and they were not ready to accept changes and see women’s development, so it was more challenging for us ...more
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"But in a country still recovering from the oppressive rule of the Taliban, a woman coming to prominence in such a male-dominated sphere was upsetting too many people to ever fly under the radar. Afraid for her own safety, afraid for the safety of her family, Khalida left Afghanistan in 2011 when she was 23 years old" (para 2).
Jan. 12, 2018, 4:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-3

"But although the Taliban were technically no longer in control of Afghanistan—after the fall of Kabul their forces fled south and continued an insurgency against coalition forces—that didn’t mean attitudes in the country had magically changed overnight. Even now it’s not easy for women in Afghanistan to compete at any level of football. And in those early days, it was “difficult and risky,” as Khalida put it via email. 'Society was very closed and they were not ready to accept changes and see women’s development, so it was more challenging for us to play as the first women’s football players team,' she said (para 12-13). "All of this attention came ...more
Jan. 10, 2018, 4:16 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Karima, who like many Afghans goes by one name, secretly attended sixth grade in Paktia's capital, Gardez, but her family forced her to stop. 'When my brothers learned about it, they burned my books,' she said. 'Now me and my two sisters are at home, not allowed to go to school'" (para 16-17).
Jan. 10, 2018, 4:15 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"'Our families decided not to let our daughters to study after sixth grade because they had to go to school far from their homes,' said Sakhi Jaan, a resident of Chamkanai district in the eastern province of Paktia. 'There's not always someone at home to drive them and in the Pashtun community, as girls get older people don't like them going to school,' he said, referring to Afghanistan's biggest ethnic group" (para 9-10).
Jan. 10, 2018, 4:15 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"'Girls are not allowed to attend school especially after fifth and sixth grades,' said Loqman Hakim Hakimi, head of the education department in Paktia, where some 20 girls' schools have been forced to close this year, referring to areas where the Taliban operate" (para 14).
Jan. 10, 2018, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Just 5% of the province's 50,000 school-aged girls make it to sixth grade" (para 15). This data refers to the province of Paktia (CODER COMMENT-BCT).
Jan. 10, 2018, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"About 3.5 million children are out of school, 75% of them girls, due not only to violence but also a lack of female teachers, early marriage and social restrictions in the conservative society" (para 8).
Jan. 10, 2018, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"About 3.5 million children are out of school, 75% of them girls" (para 8). "Just 5% of the province's 50,000 school-aged girls make it to sixth grade" (para 15).
Jan. 10, 2018, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"Afghanistan's education system has made significant gains since the Taliban were ousted by US-led forces in 2001. Before then, girls were excluded from formal education altogether and fewer than one million boys went to school" (para 5). "The Taliban, who banned girls from school during their 1996-2001 rule, now say they do not oppose girls' education" (para 11).
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-2

"Four in every five respondents say women should have the same opportunities as men in education" (para 4). "The survey reveals that those who have some level of education are more likely to support women’s rights, compared to those with no formal education. Afghans who have a higher education (college or above) are more likely to say that women should have the same opportunities as men in education" (para 7). Figure 2 (Support for Women's Rights by Gender) shows that 85% of women support gender equality in access to education, versus 76% of men.
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Research by Global Rights estimates that nearly nine out of 10 Afghan women face physical, sexual, or psychological violence, or are forced into marriage . . . Child marriage, which increases the likelihood of early pregnancy and heightens the risk of death in childbirth, remains common in Afghanistan" (para 3). "hose who watch TV are less likely to agree with the practice of baad (the practice of giving away a daughter to another party as penalty or payment for an offence); 14.6 percent vs 29.8 percent, respectively" (para 10) (Coder comment: in the practice of baad, the exchanged daughters either become servants or brides - ARR).
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-2

"Those who watch TV are more likely to say political leadership positions should be equal for both men and women (48.6 percent) compared to those who don’t watch TV (30.9 percent)" (para 10). "Pashtuns are less likely to support gender equality in political leadership positions (32.7 percent), than are Hazaras (57.1 percent)" (para 12). Figure 2 (Support for Women’s Rights by Gender) shows that 51% of women say that political leadership positions should be equal for men and women, while just 34% percent of men agree. Figure 1 (Acceptable Employment Venues for Women, By Education Attainment) shows that among those with no education, government offices are considered acceptable employment for ...more
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Those who watch TV are less likely to agree with the practice of baad (the practice of giving away a daughter to another party as penalty or payment for an offence); 14.6 percent vs 29.8 percent, respectively" (para 10) (Coder comment - in the practice of baad, the exchanged daughters become either servants or brides - ARR).
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"According to The Asia Foundation’s 2016 Survey of the Afghan People . . . Nearly 88 percent of respondents say that a daughter should be entitled to part of the inheritance from her deceased father" (para 4). "Stated acceptability of a daughter’s entitlement to part of her deceased father’s inheritance is high among respondents with some level of education compared to those with no formal education" (para 8).
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2

"Recent research points to potentially positive changes in perceptions surrounding women’s rights among Afghans. According to The Asia Foundation’s 2016 Survey of the Afghan People, 74 percent of respondents say women should be allowed to work outside the home, a 10 percent increase from the 2015 survey" (para 4). "While Afghans’ support for women working outside the home has increased significantly since 2015, respondents’ views on the acceptability of women’s employment opportunities differ based on the respondents’ level of education. Again, we find that education is one of the strongest factors to explain Afghans’ views toward women working in various employments [see Figure 1]" (para 9). "79.3 percent of those ...more
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"According to The Asia Foundation’s 2016 Survey of the Afghan People . . . more than half of respondents (56.9 percent) say that if women vote, they should decide for themselves whom to vote for, an increase from 50.1 percent in 2015" (para 4). "Support for women’s independence while voting is high among Hazaras (69.4 percent) compared to Pashtuns (46.7 percent)" (para 12). Figure 2 (Support for Women’s Rights by Gender) shows that 60% of women are in support of women’s independence in voting, versus 54% of men.
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

"The overall status of women in Afghanistan remains persistently low. Women’s safety and rights in the country remain under threat. Research by Global Rights estimates that nearly nine out of 10 Afghan women face physical, sexual, or psychological violence" (para 3).
Dec. 28, 2017, 8:58 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1, GP-DATA-1, GP-DATA-2, GP-DATA-6

"Since the fall of the Taliban, measurable gains have been made for Afghan women in terms of their political participation, with women today even taking an active role in Afghanistan’s government and civil society: four of Afghanistan’s key ministries are led by women, a woman was nominated to the supreme court for the first time (although her nomination was later rejected), and four of Afghanistan’s embassies are run by women ambassadors" (para 2).