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Latest items for Afghanistan

June 12, 2018, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRCM-LAW-3

"Subtitle states: 'After years of attempting to seek justice her father is finally in custody pending trial'" (1:34). From this statement, it appears there are laws against incest, or at least rape, but the authorities are slow to enforce them (AA-CODER COMMENT). "Subtitle states: 'Khatera is the first women in Afghanistan to bring a case of incest to trial'" (2:09).
June 12, 2018, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRCM-DATA-2

"The subtitle states: 'Kahtera is expecting a second child. Both pregnancies are the result of abuse from her father'" (0:43). "When Kahtera askes her father why he is abusing her, the subtitle states: 'He said, 'my child, I am just being kind to you, every father does this''" (1:01). It is unclear if the father actually believes, or knows, that incest is that common or if he is just justifying his own actions. The trailer indicates that incest is more common in Afghanistan than is realized (AA-CODER COMMENT). "Subtitle sates: 'For over 13 years Kathera was repeatedly raped by her father'" (1:09).
June 12, 2018, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-3

"Kahtera speaking to reports according to subtitles says: 'If the court fails to carry out the sentence me and my children will be at risk, my fathers family will hunt us down'" (2:52). While it is not indicated whether this action is legal or not, it appears that the society is aware that there is danger of a women being killed for speaking out about abuse (AA-CODER COMMENT).
June 12, 2018, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRCM-PRACTICE-2

"Kahtera states that: 'One day I locked myself in my room and telephoned the police. They arrested him [father who repeated raped her] at 1pm but he was back home by 4pm'" (1:18). "Subtitle states: 'After years of attempting to seek justice her father is finally in custody pending trial'" (1:34). "Kahtera reports according to the subtitles that: 'The judge acused me of lying' despite the signs of pregnancy" (2:19). It appears the judge is not keen on declaring that incest has actually occured and seeks to blame the victim instead (AA-CODER COMMENT).
June 12, 2018, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"An advisor counsels Kahtera and the subtitle states the following: 'We need to prove that it was rape and not consensual intercourse, otherwise they are going to charge you for illegal sex'" (1:14). It appears from this statement that there are laws against rape, but it may be difficult to prove (AA-CODER COMMENT).
June 12, 2018, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"An advisor counsels Kahtera and the subtitle states the following: 'We need to prove that it was rape and not consensual intercourse, otherwise they are going to charge you for illegal sex'" (1:14). While there are laws, it appears that part of the evidence must include proof that the encounter was not concensual in order to find fault with the attacker (AA-CODER COMMENT).
June 5, 2018, 9:02 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-LAW-2

"The law has three chapters and 29 articles which is aimed to end women and children harassment in the country. The law was approved a year ago by parliament and was signed by President Ashraf Ghani this week. Under the law, jail terms and cash fines will be imposed on perpetrators of harassment against women and children" (Para 1-3). "In this law, verbal, physical, written and visual harassments in anywhere against women and children have been defined as a crime. According to article 24 of the law, if anyone commits harassment against women and children in public places and vehicles, will be fined 5,000 to 10,000 AFs. In another article,...more
June 5, 2018, 9:02 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

"In another article, the law says that anyone who commits harassment against women and children in workplace, healthcare and educational centers will have to pay 10,000 to 20,000 AFs as fine" (Para 10).
June 5, 2018, 9:02 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"'Almost all families are affected by harassment. We hope that a mechanism should be prepared,; said Fawzia Kofi, head of the Wolesi Jirga, Lower House of Parliament, human and women’s rights commission" (Para 5). "'Harassments occur in different ways and people’s rights are violated. All these are because of peoples’ low level of awareness and misinterpretation of Islam’s teachings,' university lecturer Maryam Nasiri said. Basira, a resident of Kabul, said when women and girls get out of their homes and go to work, university or other places, they face with different types of harassment. 'When a goes out of home, she faces different types of harassment such as verbal abuse...more
June 3, 2018, 6:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1, MARR-PRACTICE-1, WR-PRACTICE-1

"Widows are often rejected as immoral or regarded as burdens: they suffer violence, expulsion, ostracism and sometimes forced remarriage, often with a brother-in-law, as reported by the UN Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) in a rare study published in 2014," (1).
June 3, 2018, 6:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-DATA-1

"It is estimated there are as many as 2.5 million widows in Afghanistan today," (1).
June 3, 2018, 6:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-2

"Widows are often rejected as immoral or regarded as burdens: they suffer violence, expulsion, ostracism and sometimes forced remarriage, often with a brother-in-law, as reported by the UN Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) in a rare study published in 2014," (1). Often uneducated and cloistered at home, the women have few options if their husbands die. At best, they receive $150 a year from the government if their husband was killed in fighting. They survive by doing household chores, a little sewing, or by sending their children to beg in the bazaar," (1).
June 3, 2018, 6:04 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-3

"Women are perceived as being owned by their father before becoming their husband's property," (1).
May 30, 2018, 8:31 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

Concerning Afghanistan: "Widows cannot work, like most women in traditional areas, and any inheritance or property would go to her husband’s brothers, not to his widow or children."
May 30, 2018, 8:27 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-8

This article told the story of Khadija, an Afghan woman. About her, it is noted, "Even before she was born, Khadijah was engaged to her first cousin . . . Their fathers were brothers." The article intimates the practice of cousin marriage among cousins on the patrilineal side is quite common.
May 29, 2018, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"A young girl was gang-raped and brutally killed by unknown gunmen in southern Uruzgan province of Afghanistan, the local officials said Sunday. The incident took place in the vicinity of Gezab district, involving several armed men, repeated raping the 8-year-old victim and hanging her to death. The district police chief Lalai Achekzai confirmed the girl was gang-raped by a group of individuals in Dara-e-Syedan area of Gezab district" (para 1-3). "This comes as rape incidents involving armed individuals against the minor children are on the rise in the remote parts of the country amid rampant violence against the women. The Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission officials said last year that...more
May 29, 2018, 3:28 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IW-PRACTICE-1

This article indicates that widows in Afghanistan are typically married to their dead husband's brothers. The woman in this story, Khadijah, was married to three of the brothers in the same family. After her first husband died, she married the next youngest brother, and after he died, she married the next brother. "Their Pashtun society considers it the duty of brothers to marry their brothers' widows--and leaves those widows with little choice but to obey, or lose their children and their homes."
May 13, 2018, 7:53 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-4, DSFMF-LAW-1, DV-PRACTICE-1, DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Women in need of protection who could not find it often ended up in prison, either due to a lack of a protection center in their province or district, or based on local interpretation of “running away” as a moral crime. Adultery, fornication, and kidnapping are crimes under the law. Women often were convicted of those crimes in situations of abuse, rape, or forced marriage, or on the basis of invalid evidence, including virginity tests. Running away is not a crime under the law, and both the Supreme Court and AGO issued directives to this effect, but women and girls continued to be detained for running away from home or...more
May 13, 2018, 7:41 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-1, GP-DATA-3, DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"The Ministry of Women’s Affairs, as well as nongovernmental entities, sometimes arranged marriages for women who could not return to their families. Police units charged with addressing violence against women, children, and families, included female officers. Although trained to help victims of domestic violence, the officers were hindered by instructions to wait for victims to take the initiative and reach out to them" (para 36).
May 13, 2018, 7:29 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-DATA-1, UVAW-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-2, MARR-DATA-1, DV-DATA-1

"The AIHRC reported 2,621 cases of violence against women from January through August, including nine killings, 79 cases of sexual violence, 34 sexual harassment cases, 733 beatings, and 44 forced engagements or marriages. Because of the security situation in the country, large numbers of violent crimes committed against women were unreported" (para 33).
May 13, 2018, 6:48 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, LRW-LAW-1, LRW-LAW-2, LRCM-PRACTICE-1, LRCM-LAW-2, MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAW-LAW-1, DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-LAW-1, DV-LAW-2

"The EVAW law criminalizes violence against women, including rape, battery, or beating; forced marriage; humiliation; intimidation; and deprivation of inheritance, although its implementation remained limited. The law provides for a sentence of 16 to 20 years’ imprisonment for rape. If the act results in the death of the victim, the law provides for a death sentence for the perpetrator. The law provides for imprisonment of up to seven years for the “violation of chastity of a woman...that does not result in adultery (such as sexual touching).” Under the law, rape does not include spousal rape. The law was not widely understood, and some in the public and the religious communities...more
May 13, 2018, 6:37 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Authorities imprisoned some women for reporting crimes perpetrated against them and detained some as proxies for a husband or male relative convicted of a crime on the assumption the suspect would turn himself in to free the family member. Authorities placed some women in protective custody to prevent violence by family members. They also employed protective custody (including placement in a detention center) for women who had experienced domestic violence, if no shelters were available to protect them from further abuse. The presidential decree on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW)--commonly referred to as the EVAW law--obliges police to arrest persons who abuse women. Implementation and awareness of the...more
May 13, 2018, 6:34 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-1, DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Police and legal officials often charged women with intent to commit zina to justify their arrest and incarceration for social offenses, such as running away from home, rejecting a spouse chosen by her family, fleeing domestic violence or rape, or eloping. Article 130 of the constitution provides that in cases not explicitly covered by the provisions of the constitution or other laws, courts may, in accordance with Hanafi jurisprudence (a school of sharia, or Islamic law) and within the limits set by the constitution, rule in a manner that best attains justice in the case. Although observers stated this provision was widely understood to apply only to civil cases, many...more
May 13, 2018, 6:15 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee expresses its deep concern at the high prevalence of violence against women in the State party, in particular domestic violence, rape, battery and laceration" (para 22).
May 13, 2018, 6:15 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee is also concerned about the challenges which impede the full implementation of the National Action Plan for the Women of Afghanistan, such as the lack of resources and the lack of accountability at the ministerial level responsible for its implementation" (para 18).
May 13, 2018, 6:14 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee notes the efforts of the State party to make the formal justice system accessible for its population, in particular for women, through the establishment of courts in remote areas, family courts and a prosecution office on violence against women and through the training of women judges. It is concerned that, despite these efforts, the police and the prosecutors continuously refer cases relating to violence against women, including domestic violence, to informal justice mechanisms (jirgas and shuras) for advice or resolution, despite the fact that many of these cases should be formally prosecuted and that decisions of informal justice mechanisms are discriminatory against women and undermine the implementation of...more
April 29, 2018, 7:23 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-3

"The Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission reported a seven percent rise in violent assaults against women — from 1,394 to 2,579 — in the last two years in Afghanistan. But these statistics can mean that women are more empowered to report violence, not necessarily that the number of incidents are growing, said Horia Mosadiq, Afghanistan’s researcher for Amnesty International. “We know for sure that there’s more fear,” Mosadiq said. “But some of the systemic use of violence and attacks against women’s rights activists and women in public offices by Taliban have always been our concern'" (Para 10).
April 29, 2018, 7:23 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"In early July, the citizens of Kabul were faced with a confronting sight. Armed with a loudspeaker, novice rapper Elinaa Rezaie hit the streets, lifted the front of her burqa and displayed a bandaged face to passersby in the Pul-i-Surkh district of the city. Rezaie stood before the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission building, protesting violence against women and the acid attacks she and others feared. That day, Nafisa Nouri, a wife and mother of two girls, was hospitalized after an attack. Nouri’s 7-year-old daughter Parinaz and another female relative of the family also suffered burns to their bodies and face from the acid. Mobilzed by her anger, Rezaie rapped...more
April 29, 2018, 7:23 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"That fear is disrupting women’s already limited freedoms in Kabul, said activist Frozan Marofi, who travels to dangerous parts of the country to meet with women and discuss economic and health empowerment. She receives frequent anonymous death threats on the phone and was rescued by male neighbors as two men threw punches at her on the street near her home a year ago" (Para 12).
April 29, 2018, 7:23 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

"The Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission reported a seven percent rise in violent assaults against women — from 1,394 to 2,579 — in the last two years in Afghanistan. But these statistics can mean that women are more empowered to report violence, not necessarily that the number of incidents are growing, said Horia Mosadiq, Afghanistan’s researcher for Amnesty International. 'We know for sure that there’s more fear,' Mosadiq said. 'But some of the systemic use of violence and attacks against women’s rights activists and women in public offices by Taliban have always been our concern'" (Para 10).