The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Afghanistan

Sept. 15, 2017, 4:13 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"While all women’s sports here are suffering, none have failed quite as spectacularly as the women’s national cycling team. Celebrated in documentaries, and the subject of a 2014 book and a blizzard of news articles, the team was recently nominated for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize — thanks to the tireless promotion of its benefactor, Shannon Galpin, who financed the team through her Colorado-based charity, Mountain to Mountain.However, Ms. Galpin announced on her web page last month that she would no longer support the Afghan Cycling Federation because of what she described as 'out of control' corruption by the team’s longtime coach and the head of the federation, Haji Abdul ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:13 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-2

"Shamila Kohestani is a women’s soccer success story, going from captain of the women’s team in 2007 to a scholarship at Drew University in New Jersey. Her dream had been to return here as a coach, but after a recent visit to Kabul she decided not to"(para 25)
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:13 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATC-DATA-7

"One of the main supporters of women’s sports in Afghanistan is the American government, which spends $1.5 million a year on coeducational sports programs — not counting a $450,000 cricket grant that officials took back when they realized no women’s cricket was being played. American officials, however, declined to discuss women’s sports on the record"(para 5)."But it turned out that the United States Embassy had awarded a grant of $450,000 last summer to promote women’s cricket and had sent it to Lapis Communications, a private organization, to administer. Those funds have now been returned to the American Embassy, said a Lapis official, Sarah-Jean Cunningham. 'This program did not get the ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Robina Jalali was on the first women’s team to compete in 2004 in the Olympics for Afghanistan after the Taliban were toppled. A runner, she was one of two at the 2004 Games. Now the head of women’s sports at the National Olympic Committee, she says that even the foreign embassies are no longer paying much attention.'The main problem is the growing insecurity we have; secondly, violence against women, which is growing. Women are not feeling safe to train,' she said. 'Now we see the youth are just running away from the country, which has changed the mentality of the embassies,' she continued. 'They feel they can’t give a girl ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Tuba Sangar is the current head of women’s cricket [which is possibly not currently functioning] — the person Mr. Anderson described as 'a girl in an office with a business card.' When contacted, she said she was not allowed to comment"(para 21)
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-3, ATDW-DATA-1

"Mr. Seddiqi was recently dismissed from his post as both coach and head of the federation by the president of the Afghanistan National Olympic Committee, Mohammad Zaher Aghbar, who cited something besides corruption. He claimed that Mr. Seddiqi had successively married and divorced three of the young women on his team. 'He has married three of them — three times — and the girls were all complaining about him,' Mr. Aghbar said.In an interview, Mr. Seddiqi denied the corruption charges, claimed Ms. Galpin’s organization was still financing the cycling federation and called the accusations against him 'a lot of made-up crap.' Mr. Seddiqi, 62, acknowledged that he had three prior ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2, MABFC-DATA-1

"The team captain, Forozan Tajali, 22, took over the training session. She said security concerns, family pressure and public harassment were not the only difficulties the soccer players faced. The national team has lost more members to marriage than anything else, she said, because Afghan women are considered too old to wed after their early 20s, and their husbands typically refuse to allow them to play"(para 29)
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"While all women’s sports here are suffering, none have failed quite as spectacularly as the women’s national cycling team. Celebrated in documentaries, and the subject of a 2014 book and a blizzard of news articles, the team was recently nominated for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize — thanks to the tireless promotion of its benefactor, Shannon Galpin, who financed the team through her Colorado-based charity, Mountain to Mountain.However, Ms. Galpin announced on her web page last month that she would no longer support the Afghan Cycling Federation because of what she described as 'out of control' corruption by the team’s longtime coach and the head of the federation, Haji Abdul ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Robina Jalali was on the first women’s team to compete in 2004 in the Olympics for Afghanistan after the Taliban were toppled. A runner, she was one of two at the 2004 Games. Now the head of women’s sports at the National Olympic Committee, she says that even the foreign embassies are no longer paying much attention.'The main problem is the growing insecurity we have; secondly, violence against women, which is growing. Women are not feeling safe to train,' she said. 'Now we see the youth are just running away from the country, which has changed the mentality of the embassies,' she continued. 'They feel they can’t give a girl ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"While all women’s sports here are suffering, none have failed quite as spectacularly as the women’s national cycling team. Celebrated in documentaries, and the subject of a 2014 book and a blizzard of news articles, the team was recently nominated for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize — thanks to the tireless promotion of its benefactor, Shannon Galpin, who financed the team through her Colorado-based charity, Mountain to Mountain. However, Ms. Galpin announced on her web page last month that she would no longer support the Afghan Cycling Federation because of what she described as 'out of control' corruption by the team’s longtime coach and the head of the federation, Haji ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-2

"One of the main supporters of women’s sports in Afghanistan is the American government, which spends $1.5 million a year on coeducational sports programs — not counting a $450,000 cricket grant that officials took back when they realized no women’s cricket was being played. American officials, however, declined to discuss women’s sports on the record"(para 5)."Shamila Kohestani is a women’s soccer success story, going from captain of the women’s team in 2007 to a scholarship at Drew University in New Jersey. Her dream had been to return here as a coach, but after a recent visit to Kabul she decided not to"(para 25)
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"Robina Jalali was on the first women’s team to compete in 2004 in the Olympics for Afghanistan after the Taliban were toppled. A runner, she was one of two at the 2004 Games. Now the head of women’s sports at the National Olympic Committee, she says that even the foreign embassies are no longer paying much attention.'The main problem is the growing insecurity we have; secondly, violence against women, which is growing. Women are not feeling safe to train,' she said"(para 22-23)."Despite that incentive [pay], only 10 national team members out of 22 (the women play 11-a-side soccer) came out for a recent two-hour practice; their coach, a man, did ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1

"Members of the adult and under 17 women’s soccer teams training in Kabul on March 13. The women’s soccer team, often held up as as an example of success, has not played internationally since 2014"(para 21). One of the players is wearing a hijab, one is wearing a baseball cap which covers her hair, and two are wearing scarves that cover part of their hair (ENB-Coder Comment)."Ms. Kohestani thinks that Afghan officials never really supported the idea of women in sports, saying they only feigned interest because women’s sports were such grant magnets. 'They would say, "I would never let my daughter do that,"' she said. 'They treated us like ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Robina Jalali was on the first women’s team to compete in 2004 in the Olympics for Afghanistan after the Taliban were toppled. A runner, she was one of two at the 2004 Games. Now the head of women’s sports at the National Olympic Committee, she says that even the foreign embassies are no longer paying much attention.'The main problem is the growing insecurity we have; secondly, violence against women, which is growing. Women are not feeling safe to train,' she said. 'Now we see the youth are just running away from the country, which has changed the mentality of the embassies,' she continued. 'They feel they can’t give a girl ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

"KABUL, Afghanistan — Women’s sports programs in Afghanistan, long a favorite of Western donors, have all but collapsed. Some consist of little more than a young woman with a business card and a desk, as one insider described the women’s version of cricket, Afghanistan’s most popular game. Others, like women’s soccer, have managed to field a few teams for practices and training sessions but have not played an international match in years.Even the relatively few encouraging stories, like women’s taekwondo, one of the sports that may see an Afghan woman sent to the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, are at best qualified successes. Afghanistan’s strongest hope for a female ...more
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

"Robina Jalali was on the first women’s team to compete in 2004 in the Olympics for Afghanistan after the Taliban were toppled. A runner, she was one of two at the 2004 Games. Now the head of women’s sports at the National Olympic Committee, she says that even the foreign embassies are no longer paying much attention.'The main problem is the growing insecurity we have; secondly, violence against women, which is growing. Women are not feeling safe to train,' she said"(para 22-23)
Sept. 11, 2017, 6:36 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: MAAO-PRACTICE-1

"Among Afghan families, menstruation is a shameful secret. It is almost never discussed, even between mother and daughter, and girls often start their menses without understanding what is happening to them. Masculinity, on the other hand, is celebrated — male circumcision is a time for family parties" (para 2). "Fatima was 12 when her period started. The fear, shame and guilt are still raw and she struggles to describe her experiences. The older women in Fatima’s family warned her to never discuss the issue. All she needed to know was that her period was unclean, while anything related to her vagina was taboo" (para 3). "Afghan women’s entrance into adulthood ...more
Sept. 11, 2017, 6:36 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"According to a joint study between the Ministry of Education and UNICEF conducted in Kabul and nearby Parwan Province, 29 percent of girls miss school due to menstruation" (para 6).
Sept. 11, 2017, 6:36 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"Most girls don’t have the money or support from their mothers to buy appropriate hygiene products. Sanitary pads can sometimes be found in supermarkets in major Afghan cities, but are hidden away in a section that not many can see" (para 5). "Ministry of Education and UNICEF conducted in Kabul and nearby Parwan Province, 29 percent of girls miss school due to menstruation, over 70 percent do not shower during their period and half were unaware of what it was before it started. Ignorance has led girls and women to use dirty rags that can lead to infection, and many are too ashamed to ask for medication during painful cramps. ...more
Sept. 11, 2017, 6:36 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Afghan women’s entrance into adulthood is not acknowledged, in part because female sexuality remains off-limits. Girls and teens are scared as changes occur in their bodies. They are ignorant and confused about how to cope. Unspoken expectations also haunt them. They must stop being children, and begin behaving like adults. For females, this means being submissive and acting with humility, especially towards men" (para 4).
Sept. 1, 2017, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LO-SCALE-3

3.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 8:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LO-SCALE-2

1.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LO-SCALE-1

2.0
Aug. 31, 2017, 8:16 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRCM-LAW-1

"Women are regularly imprisoned for refusing to marry, for running away from their husbands, and for 'adultery' when they are raped" (p 4)
Aug. 31, 2017, 8:15 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: LRCM-LAW-1, LRCM-LAW-2

"The issue of marital rape is never considered or reported, since women have no choice in terms of consenting to sexual intercourse with their spouse" (21)
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-SCALE-1

4.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DACH-SCALE-1

4.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DACH-SCALE-2

2.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DACH-SCALE-1

3.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: BR-SCALE-1

3.0