The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Algeria

Dec. 22, 2017, 7:04 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: EWCMS-PRACTICE-4

"Algerian women’s struggles go back to the revolutionary war of 1954-1962. In 1956, Algerian women participated in a series of terror bomb attacks launched by a nationalist guerrilla network" (para 5).
Dec. 22, 2017, 7:04 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: EWCMS-PRACTICE-1

"Algerian women’s struggles go back to the revolutionary war of 1954-1962. In 1956, Algerian women participated in a series of terror bomb attacks launched by a nationalist guerrilla network" (para 5).
Dec. 22, 2017, 7:04 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-3

"Algerian women’s struggles go back to the revolutionary war of 1954-1962. In 1956, Algerian women participated in a series of terror bomb attacks launched by a nationalist guerrilla network" (para 5) (Coder comment: women were used because they would draw less suspicion from the colonialists, despite the fact that they were untrained in combat and not necessarily part of the rebel army). "French colonialist propaganda, which claimed to want to 'emancipate' Muslim women, but which was also intended to counter Algeria’s nationalist struggle during 1957-1959. Indeed, the colonial authorities’ campaign of unveiling Muslim women led to the showcasing of 'emancipated women' to promote French ideals" (para 9-10).
Dec. 22, 2017, 7:03 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Still, progressive statements promoting gender equality in a free Algeria faced conservatism from nationalists little accustomed to female activism" (para 16). "But the USTA’s efforts to advance women’s rights were not enough. Unionist Fatma Mezrag said in 1959 in Lille, a working class town in the north of France, that fighting colonialism would not be enough to liberate Algerian women. She said men had to address their selfishness, lust and oppression" (para 23). "And despite the progressive views of some male leaders within the country, Algerian women couldn’t directly challenge religious oppression, economic exploitation, or nationalist patriarchy in a newly independent Algeria" (para 26).
Dec. 22, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Protests were held across the country – in Constantine, Oran, Algiers and Béjaïa – to pay tribute to female victims of violence" (para 2). "Female activists have long challenged their marginalisation in male-dominated environments" (para 5). "In 1958, during a nationalist meeting at the Casablanca Labour Exchange, a group of Algerian women spoke before hundreds of men, saying: You make a revolution, you fight colonialist oppression but you maintain the oppression of women; beware, another revolution will certainly occur after Algeria’s independence: a women’s revolution! The women had to speak up because the nation’s anti-colonial revolution was so strongly dominated by men. But their words could also be seen as ...more
Dec. 22, 2017, 7:01 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Unionist Fatma Mezrag said in 1959 . . . men had to address their selfishness, lust and oppression" (para 23).
Dec. 22, 2017, 7:01 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2

"Across Algeria, women are protesting against unemployment and campaigning for their rights" (para 30).
Dec. 22, 2017, 7 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"The French-based Algerian Workers’ Trade Union (USTA) passed a motion during its first convention in 1957 on 'Algerian woman’s liberation' and appointed Kheira Moujahadi to represent a delegation of working women on its executive committee. The union was close to the Algerian National Movement (MNA), and chaired by veteran nationalist leader Messali Hadj. The USTA’s newspaper, La Voix du travailleur algérien, published in 1958 an article by a woman known as Yamina B. which argued for emancipation by giving a voice to Algerian working women. Young female unionists such as Baya Maanane and activist Fatma Mezrag also promoted women rights to male audiences during May 1 Labour Day meetings that ...more
Dec. 22, 2017, 7 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"Algerian women’s struggles go back to the revolutionary war of 1954-1962. In 1956, Algerian women participated in a series of terror bomb attacks launched by a nationalist guerrilla network" (para 5). "The Algerian revolution that followed, and the violence against women it entailed (arrest, torture, rape and murder) undoubtedly contributed to wider recognition of women’s involvement in the anti-colonial struggle. It demonstrated that a woman such as Nassiba Kebal, a young activist who was arrested and mistreated by colonial authorities, could suffer as much as any other activist" (para 15) (Coder comment: mistreatment of women in reaction to their participation in protests against the French colonial authorities).
Dec. 22, 2017, 6:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1

"In Béjaïa, Merabet’s photo was placed among that of women assassinated by Islamists during the 1990s. They included 17-year-old Katia Bengana, who was killed for refusing to wear the hijab" (para 3).
Dec. 22, 2017, 6:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1

"In Béjaïa, Merabet’s photo was placed among that of women assassinated by Islamists during the 1990s. They included 17-year-old Katia Bengana, who was killed for refusing to wear the hijab" (para 3). "Indeed, the colonial authorities’ campaign of unveiling Muslim women led to the showcasing of 'emancipated women' to promote French ideals" (para 10). "Some, like A. Hedjila, criticised the French authorities’ unveiling 'masquerade' and stressed that women’s emancipation belonged to unionists. For Messalists, the evolution of women’s status was not 'an issue of veil or short skirt'" (para 21-22).
Dec. 22, 2017, 6:58 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"Amira Merabet, a 34-year-old woman, was burned alive in the Eastern Algerian town of El Khroub in August. Her crime: refusing a man’s advances" (para 1).
Dec. 22, 2017, 6:57 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"The Algerian revolution that followed, and the violence against women it entailed (arrest, torture, rape and murder) undoubtedly contributed to wider recognition of women’s involvement in the anti-colonial struggle" (para 15). "Unionist Fatma Mezrag said in 1959 in Lille, a working class town in the north of France, that fighting colonialism would not be enough to liberate Algerian women. She said men had to address their selfishness, lust and oppression" (para 23).
Dec. 22, 2017, 6:57 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1

"Amira Merabet, a 34-year-old woman, was burned alive in the Eastern Algerian town of El Khroub in August. Her crime: refusing a man’s advances. The murder shocked Algeria, and protests were held across the country – in Constantine, Oran, Algiers and Béjaïa – to pay tribute to female victims of violence. This was not a crime without precedent. In Béjaïa, Merabet’s photo was placed among that of women assassinated by Islamists during the 1990s. They included 17-year-old Katia Bengana, who was killed for refusing to wear the hijab. The linking of these two murders shows that memories of the civil war that raged from 1992 to 2002 remain vivid in ...more
Dec. 22, 2017, 6:56 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1, GEW-PRACTICE-1, GEW-DATA-1

"The Algerian revolution that followed, and the violence against women it entailed (arrest, torture, rape and murder) undoubtedly contributed to wider recognition of women’s involvement in the anti-colonial struggle. It demonstrated that a woman such as Nassiba Kebal, a young activist who was arrested and mistreated by colonial authorities, could suffer as much as any other activist" (para 15).
Nov. 30, 2017, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Botswana, Brunei, Cameroon, Canada, Cuba, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Mauritania, Moldova, Mongolia, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Russia, Senegal, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

According to AgeOfConsent's data, the legal age of consent is 16 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Angola, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, United Arab Emirates
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor. NGO reports indicated the laborers were managed by the government as a matter of state policy and were under constant and close surveillance by DPRK security agents. Laborers worked between 12 and 16 hours ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:12 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Angola, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, United Arab Emirates
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor"(17).This data does not specifically mention women but if trafficking is occuring, women may be especially vulnerable (ENB-Coder Comment)more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:09 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor. NGO reports indicated the laborers were managed by the government as a matter of state policy and were under constant and close surveillance by DPRK security agents. Laborers worked between 12 and 16 hours ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:52 a.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"In the Middle East and North Africa, seven countries or autonomous regions have legislation or regulations on domestic violence: Algeria, Bahrain, Iraqi Kurdistan, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia"(4)
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:51 a.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"In the Middle East and North Africa, seven countries or autonomous regions have legislation or regulations on domestic violence: Algeria, Bahrain, Iraqi Kurdistan, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia"(4)
Sept. 25, 2017, 8:22 a.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-6

12.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: LO-SCALE-3

2.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 8:51 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: LO-SCALE-2

1.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: LO-SCALE-1

1.0
Aug. 31, 2017, 8:31 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: LRCM-LAW-1

"Although women can invoke articles on assault and battery in the penal code in order to initiate legal action against abusive husbands, the grounds for divorce under the family code do not include marital violence" (1)
Aug. 31, 2017, 8:30 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: LRCM-LAW-1

"A woman, unless her husband agrees, can obtain a divorce only by petitioning a court on the basis of certain types of harm or prejudice specified in the law. In the process she is likely to face a series of legal and procedural obstacles" (p 29)
Aug. 31, 2017, 8:29 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"The law does not specifically criminalize domestic violence and marital rape" (2). If marital rape is not specifically criminalized, it feels safe to assume that it cannot be used as grounds for divorce (RNP-CODER COMMENT)
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: AFE-SCALE-1

0.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: DACH-SCALE-1

1.0