The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Bosnia-Herzegovina

Feb. 14, 2019, 7:38 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: MURDER-DATA-4

According to calculations based off of data collected from the WHO mortality database, the femicie rate for 15-44 year olds in 2010 was 0.00 per 100,000 female (15-44 age) population. There were 0 incidents of femicide (15-44 year old victims) and female (15-44 aged) population was reported as 795,820 in that year.
Feb. 8, 2019, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"Bosnia and Herzegovina eliminated several restrictions on women’s employment, including in jobs deemed arduous, jobs deemed hazardous and underwater work. It also eliminated the possibility for men and women to retire early and receive partial pension benefits, which was previously unequal" (p. 36). "Bosnia and Herzegovina adopted the Law on Free Legal Aid in 2016 to provide legal assistance in civil procedures" (p. 36).
Feb. 8, 2019, 2:04 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"Bosnia and Herzegovina eliminated several restrictions on women’s employment, including in jobs deemed arduous, jobs deemed hazardous and underwater work. It also eliminated the possibility for men and women to retire early and receive partial pension benefits, which was previously unequal" (p. 36).
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:41 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"21.4% of seats in the lower/single house of Bosnia-Herzegovina (9 out of 42 total seats) are held by women. 13.3% of seats in the upper house/Senate of Bosnia-Herzegovina (2 out of 15 total seats) are held by women"
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"22.2% of ministerial positions in Bosnia-Herzegovina (2 out of 9 total positions) are held by women"
Jan. 31, 2019, 8:14 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Guyana, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Mauritius, Moldova, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan
Variables: SUICIDE-SCALE-2

2.0
Jan. 31, 2019, 6:56 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cyprus, Ecuador, Fiji, Greece, Israel, Italy, Kuwait, Macedonia, Mexico, Panama, Philippines, Romania, Slovakia, Thailand, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela
Variables: SUICIDE-SCALE-2

1.0
Jan. 31, 2019, 3:46 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: SUICIDE-DATA-2

According to the World Health Organization, the total number of suicides for women ages 15-54 in 1991 was 47. Based on population numbers for this age group in this year from the US Census Bureau's International Database, this translates to a suicide rate of 3.76 per 100,000 for women ages 15-54 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belgium, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brunei, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Libya, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malawi, Malta, Mauritius, Montenegro, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palestine, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vietnam
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-4

0.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belgium, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brunei, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Libya, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Mauritius, Montenegro, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Vietnam
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-2

0.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: MURDER-DATA-4

According to calculations based on the WHO Homicide Estimates for 2015, the homicide rate for females aged 15-44 is 0.82 per 100,000 female population ages 15-44.
Jan. 21, 2019, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: SUICIDE-DATA-2

According to the World Health Organization, the suicide rate in 2014 for women ages 15-54 in Bosnia-Herzegovina was 2.90 per 100,000. This rate was calculated by adding the total number of suicides for women ages 15-54 and dividing by the total female population for that age group (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 16, 2019, 8:21 a.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: SUICIDE-DATA-1

According to Countryeconomy.com, the total suicide rate for women in Bosnia-Herzegovina in 2015 was 2.9 per 100,000 total female population (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Despite government efforts, women did not fully use available legal remedies because they either lacked knowledge of the laws or were concerned about the possible consequences of revealing such violence. In addition, although police received specialized training in handling cases of domestic violence, NGOs reported widespread reluctance among police officers in both entities to break up families by arresting offenders"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Despite government efforts, women did not fully use available legal remedies because they either lacked knowledge of the laws or were concerned about the possible consequences of revealing such violence. In addition, although police received specialized training in handling cases of domestic violence, NGOs reported widespread reluctance among police officers in both entities to break up families by arresting offenders"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Violence against women, including sexual assault and domestic violence, remained widespread and underreported. While laws in both entities empower authorities to remove the perpetrator from the home, officials rarely, if ever, made use of these provisions. Law enforcement officials were frequently under the mistaken impression that they needed to concern themselves with where the perpetrator would live. As a result, women in danger were compelled to go to safe houses. NGOs reported that authorities, especially in the RS, where domestic violence is a misdemeanor, often returned offenders to their family homes less than 24 hours after a violent event. In the Federation, authorities had discretion to prosecute domestic violence as...more
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:51 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"A high-level international Conference on 'Monitoring the implementation of the Istanbul Convention' took place in Sarajevo. Methodology was adopted for monitoring of the implementation of the Convention, including the methodology for data-collection. Gender Equality Agency of BiH signed with the „Safe Network BiH“, a coalition of civil society organizations, including all nine safe houses in BiH – a Memorandum of Understanding for the addressing in partnership gender-based violence in BiH. In the Federation of BiH a web-based domestic violence database has been put into operation. In order to draw the public attention to the problem of femicide, the First Regional Conference on Femicide was held in Banja Luka. Ministry for...more
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"There is reportedly a general lack of information regarding how courts decide on domestic violence cases, and how aggravating or mitigating circumstances are used in their sentencing decisions. Through interviews with the Ministries of Justice in both entities, it became clear that there is no monitoring taking place and only the High Judicial and Prosecutorial Council (HJPC) has unrestricted access to all domestic violence cases, whether pending or completed. Unfortunately the assessments, statistics and evaluations of the HJPC are not easily or publicly available, nor disclosed in annual reports. While it is important to uphold the independence of the judiciary and the separation of powers, it is also important for...more
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Interviewed activists claimed that these decisions often stem from patriarchal views among many judges. They feel that they need to be sensitive with men when deciding on a domestic violence case, because no one will provide for the family if the man is in jail. However, activists claim these concerns regarding the family budget are not considered at all in cases involving other crimes committed by men"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"During 2011, suspended sentences were handed down in most cases (75 per cent) in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, followed by prison sentences (16 per cent) and fines (6 per cent). In the case of the Republika Srpska, information available from 2010 indicates that verdicts on domestic violence included 15 prison sentences, 14 fines, 58 suspended sentences, one judicial caution and seven protective measures"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Another recurrent practice is the suspension of sentences, or courts allowing fines for offences that would normally require imprisonment, with little follow-up as regards the compliance by offenders with any conditions associated with these suspensions. This results in no real sanctions being imposed on perpetrators"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"There are reportedly also high levels of confusion among the judiciary about the nature and purpose of 'protection measures', with authorities using these in lieu of sanctions against perpetrators. Therefore, mandatory psychotherapy or substance abuse treatment will be often issued both as a 'protection measure' and as a form of punishment. Furthermore, the Special Rapporteur received numerous reports of perpetrators not complying with such mandatory treatment and facing no consequences for violating these orders"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:46 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Another common complaint made by activists was that prosecutors rely heavily on testimonies by victims, perpetrators and witnesses, rather than collecting the necessary evidence during the investigatory phase. This has a particular effect on women victims, who often undergo these criminal proceedings without adequate social, psychological and legal assistance.31 In the specific case of the Republika Srpska, even though current legislation envisages specific measures to support victims during criminal proceedings and provide free legal aid, these provisions are reportedly rarely applied"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:46 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"As regards prosecution, lesser charges are commonly brought for domestic violence even when the acts involved could qualify as aggravated forms of violence due to the use of weapons, the abuse of children, or for causing grievous bodily harm.29 Prosecutors fail to include these more serious charges, thereby impacting on the sentences imposed, which are consistently at or below the minimum levels prescribed by the law. It is reported that only in cases resulting in serious bodily injury or death of the victim are sentences in the upper range of possible penalties"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:46 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"In the Republika Srpska, for example, while domestic violence can be deemed a criminal offence, it is often tried as a misdemeanour and treated in the same way as other minor offences, without due consideration of the particular elements of gender inequality and discrimination rooted in domestic violence. There is no specialization among the courts vis-à-vis the treatment of domestic violence cases, which are often not decided with the best interest of women in mind. It is reported that only the most serious cases are identified as criminal offences by virtue of the argument that “easier” cases will be processed more quickly. Activists claim that protection measures still take up...more
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:45 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"The challenges faced by women victims are also reflected in the inadequate responses by the country’s criminal justice system. Interviewees explained that when cases of domestic violence actually reach the courts, there is often a lack of clarity on the legal reasoning behind the way these cases are ultimately decided"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:45 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Interviewees in Banja Luka claimed that protective measures are rarely issued and that no monitoring of their application is actually undertaken when they are. Furthermore, CSWs and other authorities are often reluctant to inform women of the possibility of requesting protection measures"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:44 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Even when legislation provides for protection measures such as the removal of perpetrators from the family home, this is rarely implemented. Victims are sometimes given a short period of time, ranging from 4 to 10 days, during which perpetrators are excluded from the family home and women are allowed time to collect their personal belongings and to leave the home"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:44 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"It was made clear that if a perpetrator is violent towards a woman, but not towards her children, he may still be deemed capable of caring for them and CSWs will actually promote and facilitate continued contact. While most CSWs argued that children are interviewed and that risk assessments are undertaken, this practice still has devastating consequences. It devalues the suffering of the battered victim, as well as the negative consequences that witnessing domestic violence might have had on the children. It was unclear whether CSWs have the skills to conduct effective risk assessment when they have an overwhelming focus on family unification"
Jan. 14, 2019, 2:44 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Several NGO activists argued that CSWs (Centres for Social Welfare) often fail to recognize cases of domestic violence when there is no physical violence involved. Centres will not take action when first reports of non-physical violence are received, and only react after victims return, with injuries. Another important omission in these institutions is that they do not assist women victims of past sexual violence, as the focus is solely on current family violence"