The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Cambodia

March 29, 2018, 10:36 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: PW-DATA-1

According to a 2014 DHS survey of Cambodia, the percentage of women who were married or in a union and whose husband had no additional wives was 94.3%. The percentage of women who were married or in a union and whose husband had one additional wife was 2.3%. The percentage of women who were married or in a union and whose husband had two or more additional wives was 0.5%. According to a 2010 DHS survey of Cambodia, the percentage of women who were married or in a union and whose husband had no additional wives was 92.8%. The percentage of women who were married or in a union and...more
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:29 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: ACR-LAW-1

"Cambodia has become the latest South East Asian nation to ban commercial surrogacy, with the country’s government issuing a proclamation late last month outlawing the practice" (para 1). "Surrogacy, one of a set of services to have a baby by assisted reproductive technology, is completely banned," the letter said. The ministry said commercial sperm donation is also banned and clinics and specialist doctors providing in-vitro fertilisation services will require ministry permission to operate" (para 3-4). "Sam Everingham, global director of the consultancy Families Through Surrogacy, slammed the "abrupt" ban and said it would likely trigger panic among expectant parents and surrogates now facing an uncertain future. "This sudden change does...more
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:29 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: ACR-PRACTICE-1

"The Cambodian ban will likely increase surrogacy costs globally, driving foreigners to countries like Ukraine, Georgia, Greece, Canada and the US which have protective laws in place. However surrogacy costs in the US can be as high as $200,000 while agencies charge far less in developing countries like Cambodia" (para 7).
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:29 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Sam Everingham, global director of the consultancy Families Through Surrogacy, slammed the "abrupt" ban and said it would likely trigger panic among expectant parents and surrogates now facing an uncertain future. "This sudden change does no favours to surrogates or children given the lack of information and lack of clarity," he told AFP" (para 6).
Dec. 5, 2017, 10:17 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"An oft-cited example is the work by the international NGO Helen Keller International, launched initially in Bangladesh in the 1980s, and expanded later to Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines (Ianotti, Cunningham, and Ruel 2009; Meinzen-Dick et al. 2011b). Working together with local partners, Helen Keller International supports women’s production of nutritious food on family plots, with significant reductions in micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, iron, and zinc) in the households concerned. In addition to increasing dietary diversity, such strategies may allow women to build economic assets (with the raising of poultry, for example), and improve their role in decision making within the family while fulfilling their domestic and child-care responsibilities. Women’s...more
Dec. 5, 2017, 10:09 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia, Nepal, Philippines
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"An oft-cited example is the work by the international NGO Helen Keller International, launched initially in Bangladesh in the 1980s, and expanded later to Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines (Ianotti, Cunningham, and Ruel 2009; Meinzen-Dick et al. 2011b). Working together with local partners, Helen Keller International supports women’s production of nutritious food on family plots, with significant reductions in micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, iron, and zinc) in the households concerned. In addition to increasing dietary diversity, such strategies may allow women to build economic assets (with the raising of poultry, for example), and improve their role in decision making within the family while fulfilling their domestic and child-care responsibilities"(71-72)more
Dec. 5, 2017, 9:47 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia, Nepal, Philippines
Variables: LO-DATA-1

"An oft-cited example is the work by the international NGO Helen Keller International, launched initially in Bangladesh in the 1980s, and expanded later to Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines (Ianotti, Cunningham, and Ruel 2009; Meinzen-Dick et al. 2011b). Working together with local partners, Helen Keller International supports women’s production of nutritious food on family plots, with significant reductions in micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, iron, and zinc) in the households concerned. In addition to increasing dietary diversity, such strategies may allow women to build economic assets (with the raising of poultry, for example), and improve their role in decision making within the family while fulfilling their domestic and child-care responsibilities. Women’s...more
Nov. 30, 2017, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Greece, Guinea, Honduras, Iceland, Laos, North Korea, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, Uruguay
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

According to AgeOfConsent's data, the legal age of consent is 15 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"In Cambodia, since October 2008, ADB [Asian Development Bank] has supported the Emergency Food Assistance Program. It relies principally on cash-for-work and food-for-work components to improve incomes and support access to food for women from poor rural households, and to construct infrastructure that can benefit them (Box 7)"(56)."The food-for-work and cash-for-work programs, for example, were designed to benefit women and to support the creation of infrastructure that would allow small-scale farmers— among which are many women—to increase their productivity and incomes"(56)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"In its initial phase, the program [The Cambodia Emergency Food Assistance Program] aimed to benefit a total of 500,000 people (89,000 households). Strong emphasis was placed on supporting women’s access to productive resources and on the education of girls...According to a recent assessment of the program, 22,756 female headed households benefited from free rice distribution (around 12,000 tons of rice was distributed during the food lean period of late Oct/early Nov 2008); 31,555 girls benefited from a school feeding program; 5,510 girls were awarded scholarships; 6,453 female-headed households had access to a food-for-work program; 127 female volunteer teachers for the early childhood learning centers had access to a monthly rice...more
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-2

"In Cambodia, since October 2008, ADB [Asian Development Bank] has supported the Emergency Food Assistance Program. It relies principally on cash-for-work and food-for-work components to improve incomes and support access to food for women from poor rural households, and to construct infrastructure that can benefit them (Box 7)"(56)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, LO-DATA-3

"Further, a total of 13,841 female headed households benefited from the distribution of quality seeds and subsidized sale of fertilizers"(56)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"In Cambodia, since October 2008, ADB [Asian Development Bank] has supported the Emergency Food Assistance Program. It relies principally on cash-for-work and food-for-work components to improve incomes and support access to food for women from poor rural households, and to construct infrastructure that can benefit them (Box 7)"(56)."In its initial phase, the program [The Cambodia Emergency Food Assistance Program] aimed to benefit a total of 500,000 people (89,000 households). Strong emphasis was placed on supporting women’s access to productive resources and on the education of girls"(56)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999)"(22)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"According to a recent assessment of the program [Cambodia Emergency Food Assistance Program], 22,756 female headed households benefited from free rice distribution (around 12,000 tons of rice was distributed during the food lean period of late Oct/early Nov 2008); 31,555 girls benefited from a school feeding program; 5,510 girls were awarded scholarships; 6,453 female-headed households had access to a food-for-work program; 127 female volunteer teachers for the early childhood learning centers had access to a monthly rice grant"(56)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1

"In Cambodia, since October 2008, ADB [Asian Development Bank] has supported the Emergency Food Assistance Program. It relies principally on cash-for-work and food-for-work components to improve incomes and support access to food for women from poor rural households, and to construct infrastructure that can benefit them (Box 7)"(56). "According to a recent assessment of the program, 22,756 female headed households benefited from free rice distribution (around 12,000 tons of rice was distributed during the food lean period of late Oct/early Nov 2008); 31,555 girls benefited from a school feeding program; 5,510 girls were awarded scholarships; 6,453 female-headed households had access to a food-for-work program; 127 female volunteer teachers for the...more
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

"In Cambodia, since October 2008, ADB [Asian Development Bank] has supported the Emergency Food Assistance Program. It relies principally on cash-for-work and food-for-work components to improve incomes and support access to food for women from poor rural households, and to construct infrastructure that can benefit them (Box 7)"(56). "The food-for-work and cash-for-work programs, for example, were designed to benefit women and to support the creation of infrastructure that would allow small-scale farmers— among which are many women—to increase their productivity and incomes. Infrastructure includes small irrigation canals, covering over 7,750 hectares, and over 540 kilometers of village roads"(56)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1, SMES-DATA-1, SMES-DATA-2, CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"According to a recent assessment of the program, 22,756 female headed households benefited from free rice distribution (around 12,000 tons of rice was distributed during the food lean period of late Oct/early Nov 2008); 31,555 girls benefited from a school feeding program; 5,510 girls were awarded scholarships; 6,453 female-headed households had access to a food-for-work program; 127 female volunteer teachers for the early childhood learning centers had access to a monthly rice grant; and 47,150 women (including 8,937 female-headed households) earned an income through a cash-for-work program. Further, a total of 13,841 female headed households benefited from the distribution of quality seeds and subsidized sale of fertilizers"(56)more
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"In spite of these measures [emergency food assistance], cross-border migration had increased"(56)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2, ERBG-DATA-2, ERBG-DATA-5

"In Cambodia, since October 2008, ADB [Asian Development Bank] has supported the Emergency Food Assistance Program. It relies principally on cash-for-work and food-for-work components to improve incomes and support access to food for women from poor rural households, and to construct infrastructure that can benefit them (Box 7)"(56)."The food-for-work and cash-for-work programs, for example, were designed to benefit women and to support the creation of infrastructure that would allow small-scale farmers— among which are many women—to increase their productivity and incomes. Infrastructure includes small irrigation canals, covering over 7,750 hectares, and over 540 kilometers of village roads"(56)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-3

"In Cambodia, since October 2008, ADB [Asian Development Bank] has supported the Emergency Food Assistance Program. It relies principally on cash-for-work and food-for-work components to improve incomes and support access to food for women from poor rural households, and to construct infrastructure that can benefit them (Box 7)"(56)."In its initial phase, the program [The Cambodia Emergency Food Assistance Program] aimed to benefit a total of 500,000 people (89,000 households). Strong emphasis was placed on supporting women’s access to productive resources and on the education of girls"(56)."According to a recent assessment of the program, 22,756 female headed households benefited from free rice distribution (around 12,000 tons of rice was distributed during...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:29 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia, China
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999)"(22)
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:19 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: LO-DATA-3

"An oft-cited example is the work by the international NGO Helen Keller International, launched initially in Bangladesh in the 1980s, and expanded later to Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines (Ianotti, Cunningham, and Ruel 2009; Meinzen-Dick et al. 2011b). Working together with local partners, Helen Keller International supports women’s production of nutritious food on family plots, with significant reductions in micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, iron, and zinc) in the households concerned. In addition to increasing dietary diversity, such strategies may allow women to build economic assets (with the raising of poultry, for example), and improve their role in decision making within the family while fulfilling their domestic and child-care responsibilities. Women’s...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:12 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

"An oft-cited example is the work by the international NGO Helen Keller International, launched initially in Bangladesh in the 1980s, and expanded later to Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines (Ianotti, Cunningham, and Ruel 2009; Meinzen-Dick et al. 2011b). Working together with local partners, Helen Keller International supports women’s production of nutritious food on family plots, with significant reductions in micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, iron, and zinc) in the households concerned. In addition to increasing dietary diversity, such strategies may allow women to build economic assets (with the raising of poultry, for example), and improve their role in decision making within the family while fulfilling their domestic and child-care responsibilities. Women’s...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:01 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia, Nepal, Philippines
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"An oft-cited example is the work by the international NGO Helen Keller International, launched initially in Bangladesh in the 1980s, and expanded later to Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines (Ianotti, Cunningham, and Ruel 2009; Meinzen-Dick et al. 2011b). Working together with local partners, Helen Keller International supports women’s production of nutritious food on family plots, with significant reductions in micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, iron, and zinc) in the households concerned. In addition to increasing dietary diversity, such strategies may allow women to build economic assets (with the raising of poultry, for example), and improve their role in decision making within the family while fulfilling their domestic and child-care responsibilities"(71-72)more
Nov. 29, 2017, 3:41 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia, Nepal, Philippines
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"An oft-cited example is the work by the international NGO Helen Keller International, launched initially in Bangladesh in the 1980s, and expanded later to Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines (Ianotti, Cunningham, and Ruel 2009; Meinzen-Dick et al. 2011b). Working together with local partners, Helen Keller International supports women’s production of nutritious food on family plots, with significant reductions in micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, iron, and zinc) in the households concerned. In addition to increasing dietary diversity, such strategies may allow women to build economic assets (with the raising of poultry, for example), and improve their role in decision making within the family while fulfilling their domestic and child-care responsibilities. Women’s...more
Nov. 28, 2017, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Nepal, Philippines
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"An oft-cited example is the work by the international NGO Helen Keller International, launched initially in Bangladesh in the 1980s, and expanded later to Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines (Ianotti, Cunningham, and Ruel 2009; Meinzen-Dick et al. 2011b). Working together with local partners, Helen Keller International supports women’s production of nutritious food on family plots, with significant reductions in micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, iron, and zinc) in the households concerned...Although there is a risk that homestead food production may strengthen norms favoring women’s social seclusion, the opposite may be the case when a woman’s asset base develops enough to allow sales on the market and market access is not constrained"(71-72)more
Nov. 28, 2017, 9:32 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia, Nepal
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"An oft-cited example is the work by the international NGO Helen Keller International, launched initially in Bangladesh in the 1980s, and expanded later to Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines (Ianotti, Cunningham, and Ruel 2009; Meinzen-Dick et al. 2011b). Working together with local partners, Helen Keller International supports women’s production of nutritious food on family plots, with significant reductions in micronutrient deficiencies (vitamin A, iron, and zinc) in the households concerned. In addition to increasing dietary diversity, such strategies may allow women to build economic assets (with the raising of poultry, for example), and improve their role in decision making within the family while fulfilling their domestic and child-care responsibilities. Women’s...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Angola, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, United Arab Emirates
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor. NGO reports indicated the laborers were managed by the government as a matter of state policy and were under constant and close surveillance by DPRK security agents. Laborers worked between 12 and 16 hours...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:12 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Angola, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, United Arab Emirates
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor"(17).This data does not specifically mention women but if trafficking is occuring, women may be especially vulnerable (ENB-Coder Comment)more