The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Cameroon

Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Guyana, Iceland, Iraq, Italy, Kazakhstan, Laos, Latvia, Macedonia, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, South Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tanzania, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

1.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Angola, Bahamas, Benin, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Congo, D R Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea-Bissau, Iceland, Laos, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, North Korea, Peru, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

0.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The 2011 anti-trafficking law criminalized some forms of sex trafficking and all forms of labor trafficking. Inconsistent with international law, Cameroon’s law required a demonstration of force, fraud, or coercion to constitute a child sex trafficking offense, and therefore did not criminalize all forms of child sex trafficking. The law prescribed penalties of 10 to 20 years’ imprisonment and a fine of 50,000 to 1 million Central African francs (CFA) ($83- $1,660), which were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with penalties prescribed for other serious crimes, such as rape. If the trafficking offense involved a victim who was 15 years old or younger, the penalties increased...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"NGOs reported thousands of Cameroonian workers remained in Middle Eastern countries, and many of these workers were at risk of traffickers subjecting them to domestic servitude or sex trafficking. During the reporting period, the government repatriated at least 14 trafficking victims from Kuwait and issued them special travel documents (laisser passer) after traffickers seized their passports. The government repatriated three trafficking victims during the previous reporting period (...) The government could grant temporary residency status to foreign victims who, if deported, may face hardship or retribution; however, it did not report providing this accommodation during the reporting period" (139).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Cameroon, and traffickers exploit victims from Cameroon abroad. Child traffickers often use the promise of education or a better life in urban areas to convince rural parents to give their children over to an intermediary, who then exploits the children in sex trafficking or forced labor. Criminals subject homeless children and orphans to sex trafficking and forced labor in urban areas. Some labor recruiters lure teenagers and adolescents from economically disadvantaged families to cities with the prospect of employment and then subject victims to labor or sex trafficking. Traffickers exploit Cameroonian children in domestic service,...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of the Republic of Cameroon does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Cameroon remained on Tier 2. These efforts included convicting more traffickers, identifying and referring trafficking victims to services, and providing repatriation assistance for more foreign trafficking victims. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government did not fully disseminate its standard operating procedures on victim identification and referral to law enforcement or first responders and did not pass draft anti-trafficking legislation from 2012...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"The government reported identifying and referring 62 victims to government services during the reporting period, compared with identifying 136 potential victims during the previous reporting period when data may have included victims of trafficking-related crimes. In 2018, the Ministry of Social Affairs (MINAS) reported identifying 877 street children vulnerable to trafficking, and referred 307 of those children either to government-run shelters or reunited them with their families" (139).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
Aug. 8, 2019, 9:35 a.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: CWC-DATA-3, CWC-DATA-4

"An international organization reported in December 2018 Cameroon accommodated over 437,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) resulting from the Anglophone crisis. In addition to the IDPs, Cameroon has more than 1.1 million individuals of concern—including refugees from the Central African Republic (CAR) and Nigeria—as of December 2018. Both the IDPs and the individuals of concern are vulnerable to trafficking due to their economic instability and lack of access to formal justice" (140).
July 24, 2019, 6:31 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon, Central African Rep, Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"Chadian children were also found in forced cattle herding in Cameroon, the CAR, and Nigeria" (page 22).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, CONST-LAW-1

"The constitution provides for the same legal status and rights for women and men; however, in law women did not enjoy the same rights and privileges as men. Although local government officials including mayors claimed women had access to land in their constituencies, the overall sociocultural practice of denying women the right to own land, especially through inheritance, was prevalent in most regions" (Pg 27).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"The law provides for tuition-free compulsory primary education but does not set an age limit. Children were generally expected to complete primary education at age 12. Secondary school students had to pay tuition and other fees in addition to buying uniforms and books. This rendered education unaffordable for many children" (Pg 27).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Discrimination in employment and occupation allegedly occurred with respect to ethnicity, HIV status, disability, gender, and sexual orientation, especially in the private sector" (Pg 38).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, LRW-PRACTICE-2, LRW-LAW-1, LRW-LAW-2, LRCM-LAW-1

"The law criminalizes rape of men and women and provides penalties of between five and 10 years’ imprisonment for convicted rapists. Police and courts, however, rarely investigated or prosecuted rape cases, especially since victims often did not report them. The law does not address spousal rape" (Pg 26).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-1, AOM-LAW-1

"The minimum legal age for marriage is 18. The law punishes anyone who compels another to marry with imprisonment for five to 10 years, and with fines of 25,000 CFA francs ($47) to 1,000,000 CFA francs ($1,865). When victims are minors, punishment may not be less than a two-year prison sentence, regardless of mitigating circumstances. The court may also take away custody from parents who give away their underage children in marriage. Despite these legal provisions, some families reportedly tried to marry their girls before age 18. (For data, see the UNICEF website.)" (Pg 28).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1, INFIB-LAW-1

"The law protects the physical and bodily integrity of persons, and the 2016 penal code prohibits genital mutilation of all persons. Whoever mutilates the genitals of a person is subject to imprisonment from 10 to 20 years, and imprisonment for life if the offender habitually carries out this practice, does so for commercial purposes, or if the practice causes death. FMG/C remained a problem, but its prevalence remained low. As in the previous year, children were reportedly subjected to FGM/C in isolated areas of the Far North, East, and Southwest regions and in the Choa and Ejagham tribes, although the practice continued to decrease. For more information, see data.unicef.org/resources/female-genital-mutilation-cutting-country-profiles/" (Pg...more
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: LBHO-LAW-1, VOTE-LAW-1

"There are no laws preventing women or members of minority groups from voting, running for office, and serving as electoral monitors, or otherwise participating in political life" (Pg 22).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-2, LBHO-PRACTICE-3, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Cultural and traditional factors, however, reduced women’s political participation compared to that of men. Women remained underrepresented at all levels of government, but their political participation continued to improve" (Pg 23).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: GP-DATA-3, GP-DATA-5

"The DGSN, in partnership with UN Women, also carried out activities to combat rape and other forms of gender-based violence (GBV). From January 30 to March 31, the two organizations trained 250 police officers in the Far North region on the protection of rights of women and children vis-a-vis national and international legal frameworks. Following the training, four special units referred to as “gender desks” were established in four divisions where Boko Haram was active: Diamare, Mayo-Tsanaga, Mayo-Sava, and Logone and Chari. The units were intended to serve as counseling centers for victims of GBV" (Pg 26).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: CWC-DATA-3

"Press reporting from November 2016 indicated police and gendarmes in Buea, Southwest region, removed students, some of whom had recently been involved in protests at the local university, from their hostels, forced them to roll over in mud, and beat them with batons. According to reports, students were crammed onto military trucks and taken to undisclosed locations, where some were held for months. Some female students were allegedly raped. Rape and sexual abuse were reported in several instances. The International Crisis Group reported that security forces were responsible for sexual abuse during their response to unrest in the Anglophone regions in September and October. International humanitarian organizations reported that members...more
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2, IIP-LAW-2

"The law prohibits sexual harassment. The penal code provides for imprisonment from six months to one year and fines from 100,000 to one million CFA francs ($187-$1,865) for whoever takes advantage of the authority conferred on them by their position to harass another using orders, threats, constraints, or pressure to obtain sexual favors. The penalty is imprisonment for one to three years if the victim is a minor and from three to five years if the offender is in charge of the education of the victim. Despite these legal provisions, sexual harassment was widespread" (Pg 26-27).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"The law does not specifically prohibit domestic violence, although assault is prohibited and punishable by imprisonment and fines" (Pg 26).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1, GP-DATA-1

"For the 2013-18 electoral period, women occupied 26 of 374 council mayor positions, in comparison with 23 in 2007-13 and 10 in 2002-07. Women occupied 10 of 62 cabinet positions, 76 of 280 parliamentary seats, and senior government offices, including territorial command and security/defense positions" (Pg 23).
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Press reporting from November 2016 indicated police and gendarmes in Buea, Southwest region, removed students, some of whom had recently been involved in protests at the local university, from their hostels, forced them to roll over in mud, and beat them with batons. According to reports, students were crammed onto military trucks and taken to undisclosed locations, where some were held for months. Some female students were allegedly raped. Rape and sexual abuse were reported in several instances. The International Crisis Group reported that security forces were responsible for sexual abuse during their response to unrest in the Anglophone regions in September and October. International humanitarian organizations reported that members...more
July 17, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-1, IW-PRACTICE-1

"Widows were sometimes forcibly married to one of the deceased husband’s relatives to secure continued use of property left by the husband, including the marital home. To protect women, including widows, better, the government included provisions in the 2016 penal code addressing the eviction of one spouse from the marital home by any person other than the other spouse" (Pg 26).
May 15, 2019, 6:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cameroon, Chad, Congo, East Timor, Egypt, Eritrea, Fiji, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Israel, Jordan, Kosovo, Laos, Lesotho, Macedonia, Maldives, Mali, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Serbia, Singapore, Slovenia, Somalia, South Korea, South Sudan, Taiwan, Ukraine
Variables: GP-SCALE-1

2.0
May 1, 2019, 7:50 p.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Botswana, Brazil, Cameroon, Chad, China, D R Congo, Egypt, Ireland, Jordan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Mali, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Palestine, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Uganda, Ukraine
Variables: SUICIDE-SCALE-1

1.0
April 4, 2019, 7:27 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Colombia, Cote D'Ivoire, Cuba, D R Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Suriname, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Uganda, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-3

4.0
March 21, 2019, 1:45 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahamas, Barbados, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cameroon, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Greece, Guyana, Haiti, Iraq, Israel, Jamaica, Kosovo, Latvia, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Romania, Slovakia, Sudan, Taiwan, Togo
Variables: GP-SCALE-1

2.0
March 15, 2019, 4:43 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: GIC-LAW-3

There is paid maternity leave available to women in Cameroon of at least 14 weeks. Women receive at least 2/3 of their wages for the duration of their maternity leave. The government pays for 100% of maternity leave benefits. There is no paid parental leave. Mothers are guaranteed an equivalent position after returning to work from maternity leave. The government does support or provide childcare services. Childcare payments are not tax deductible (79). Parents in Cameroon are not able to work flexibly (79). Working flexibly, such as working from home or taking partial days off to care for children, could be considered a childcare benefit (SLE-CODER COMMENT).