The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for China

June 26, 2018, 7:54 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

In 2011, 64% of 40,069 GMAT examinees were female (2).
May 2, 2018, 9:29 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"Since 2013 two women have occupied seats in the 25-member Politburo, the first time since the early 1970s" (para 10).
May 2, 2018, 9:29 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"21 per cent of the Chinese Communist Party and 23 per cent of national civil service jobs. About 1 per cent of village committee chairs, which most directly relate to people’s everyday lives, are women. A woman has never been selected for the Standing Committee of the Politburo, the top governing body" (para 10).
May 2, 2018, 9:29 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: ATDW-LAW-1

"In 2011, China’s Supreme People’s Court interpreted the revolutionary 1950 Marriage Law and its amendments, which granted numerous freedoms and rights including common marital property, in favour of men. Now, marital property essentially belongs to the person whose name is on the property deed" (para 11).
May 2, 2018, 9:29 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

"As Leta Hong Fincher reports, in the top real estate markets of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, ‘only 30 per cent of marital home deeds include the woman’s name, even though over 70 per cent of women contribute to the marital home purchase’. Given that real estate is a major source of new wealth for Chinese, women are in a losing game" (para 12).
April 17, 2018, 8:23 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

The mandatory retirement age for women in blue-collar jobs is 50. This article indicates that this regulation allows greater labor force participation by younger women, i.e., the daughters or daughters-in-law of these women who are retiring, because the retiring woman can take care of her grandchildren.
March 7, 2018, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"The government bans gender discrimination but does not define what it is. Those who complain risk getting punished. As a result, women who have been sexually harassed rarely file police reports" (para 7).
March 7, 2018, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"In a bid to raise awareness of the problem of sexual harassment on public transportation, a group of young feminists in Guangzhou raised more than $6,000 last year from the public for an advertising campaign" (para 14).
March 7, 2018, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"In a bid to raise awareness of the problem of sexual harassment on public transportation, a group of young feminists in Guangzhou raised more than $6,000 last year from the public for an advertising campaign. But the authorities blocked it, saying it would cause 'panic to the public,' according to Xiao Meili, one of the founders of the collective. The authorities later told them that only government organizations were allowed to sponsor public-interest ads, Ms. Xiao said" (para 14-15).
March 7, 2018, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"The government bans gender discrimination but does not define what it is. Those who complain risk getting punished. As a result, women who have been sexually harassed rarely file police reports. Offenders are almost never brought to justice" (para 7).
March 7, 2018, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"In one of China’s biggest cities, the women-only subway cars are full of men" (para 1). "when the Guangzhou government began reserving cars for female passengers worried about being groped and harassed, they filled up — but not with the intended passengers" (para 3). "Based on a proposal from a member of a key political advisory body to the ruling Communist Party, the effort was launched to push the concept of 'caring for women and respecting women.' Ye Zichuan, the head of Guangzhou Metro’s publicity department, stressed that the cars were labeled for women but not 'only for women.' He said that there was no legal basis to segregate passengers...more
Jan. 19, 2018, 9:39 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"As a result, she suspects authorities have ordered China’s intensely controlled media to avoid aggressive, in-depth coverage. 'There is a history of the Chinese government being really worried about political upheaval outside its borders affecting its own population and there is no question whatsoever that the #MeToo movement is seen by the authorities as potentially posing a threat,' she says" (para 7). "On 1 January Luo published an eloquent online denunciation of her alleged experience. '[There’s] no longer any need to be afraid … we need to stand up bravely and say ‘No!’,' she wrote, urging others to speak out using the hashtag #我也是 (#WoYeShi or #MeToo)" (para 9). "Zheng...more
Jan. 19, 2018, 9:39 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-3

"In 2015 five leading feminists were detained after plotting to distribute stickers about sexual harassment on public transport" (para 16).
Jan. 19, 2018, 9:39 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Despite their nervousness, Hong Fincher wagers authorities will not completely snuff out the debate, so long as it remains 'manageable troublemaking'. 'It’s OK for an individual woman here and there to come out and talk about her experience … but if any of these women made it a really big deal or started to get a lot of sustained attention on social media I have no doubt that the police or somebody would come and visit her'" (para 14-15).
Jan. 19, 2018, 9:39 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"It has been 12 years since Luo Qianqian says she was pounced upon by her PhD supervisor while she was studying in Beijing. 'Please don’t do that,' she remembers protesting. 'I’m still a virgin.' Luo, now in her mid-30s, recalls bursting into tears at the unwanted advance" (para 1-2). "Slowly, however, women are breaking the silence in a country where one study suggested 80% of women had experienced sexual harassment" (para 8).
Jan. 19, 2018, 9:39 a.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"Luo, now in her mid-30s, recalls bursting into tears at the unwanted advance; her teacher, who denies the claims, withdrew but later touched her hand as he implored her to keep quiet. 'I was too terrified to speak,' she remembers" (para 2). "But while the Weinstein effect has swept across the Americas, Europe and other parts of Asia, there has been near silence in China’s authoritarian mainland [about sexual harassment and assault]. 'Some women have come out … [but] what’s really striking is how few,' says Leta Hong Fincher, an expert in China’s feminist movement, who argues Communist party censorship is the culprit" (para 4-5). "Huang Xueqin, a Guangzhou-based journalist...more
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:43 p.m.
Countries: China, Vietnam
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"A young woman, left, visits her mother in Northern Vietnam. She was tricked by traffickers into crossing the border to China, but managed to escape before they could force her into a marriage" (para 14). "Nguyen was just 16 when a friend's boyfriend drugged her and smuggled her into China. She tried to resist a forced marriage. For three months, she refused, even though her traffickers beat her, withheld food and threatened to kill her , she says. Finally, she relented. She says her husband was kind to her, but she never stopped missing her family in Vietnam. 'My desire to go home was indescribable,' Nguyen said. 'I agreed to...more
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:42 p.m.
Countries: China, Vietnam
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Nguyen was just 16 when a friend's boyfriend drugged her and smuggled her into China. She tried to resist a forced marriage" (para 18). "During CNN's trip to the border, the government called and told us the police had just rescued five girls as they were about to cross the border with a trafficker. We met the girls, who are just 14 years old. They said they were promised $600 to go to work in China by a neighbor from the same village" (para 26).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: China, Vietnam
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"'When I woke up I didn't know that I was in China.' Lan remembers the night that changed her whole life. While preparing for university along the border in northern Vietnam, a friend she met online asked her to a group dinner. When she was tired and wanted to go home, the people asked her to stay and talk and have a drink. Next thing she knew, she had been smuggled across the border to China. 'At that time, I wanted to leave,' says Lan. 'There were other girls there in the car but there was people to guard us.'" (para 1-5). "A young woman, left, visits her mother in...more
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:40 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Lan and Nguyen ended up in the same town in China. After two years, together they managed to slip out of their homes and take a taxi to a local police station. The whole time they were afraid their husbands' families would find them. The Chinese police investigated and eventually returned them to Vietnam" (para 31).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:37 p.m.
Countries: China, Vietnam
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1, IRP-DATA-1

"During CNN's trip to the border, the government called and told us the police had just rescued five girls as they were about to cross the border with a trafficker. We met the girls, who are just 14 years old. They said they were promised $600 to go to work in China by a neighbor from the same village" (para 26).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

The villages along the Vietnamese-Chinese border are a hunting ground for human traffickers. Girls as young as 13 say they are tricked or drugged, then spirited across the porous border by boat, motorbike or car (para 6). "Vietnamese girls as young as 13 are taken to China by human traffickers, to be sold as brides" (para 8).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-2

"To put it simply, Chinese men are hungry for brides" (para 7). "'It costs a very huge amount of money for normal Chinese man to get married to a Chinese woman,' explained Ha Thi Van Khanh, national project coordinator for the U.N.'s anti-trafficking organization in Vietnam. Traditionally, Chinese men wishing to marry local women are expected to pay for an elaborate banquet and to have purchased a new home to live in after the wedding. 'This is why they try to import women from neighboring countries, including Vietnam'" (para 16).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

The villages along the Vietnamese-Chinese border are a hunting ground for human traffickers. Girls as young as 13 say they are tricked or drugged, then spirited across the porous border by boat, motorbike or car. Young Vietnamese women are valuable commodities in China, where the one-child policy and long-standing preference for sons has heavily skewed the gender ratio. To put it simply, Chinese men are hungry for brides (para 6-7). "Vietnamese girls as young as 13 are taken to China by human traffickers, to be sold as brides" (para 8). "Villages around the border are hunting grounds for human traffickers looking for young Vietnamese women, who are approached online or...more
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-2

Nguyen was just 16 when a friend's boyfriend drugged her and smuggled her into China. She tried to resist a forced marriage. For three months, she refused, even though her traffickers beat her, withheld food and threatened to kill her (para 10).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Reducing poverty will help stop women going to China seeking work, another common way traffickers lure victims" (para 25).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-5, MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-PRACTICE-9

"'It costs a very huge amount of money for normal Chinese man to get married to a Chinese woman,' explained Ha Thi Van Khanh, national project coordinator for the U.N.'s anti-trafficking organization in Vietnam. Traditionally, Chinese men wishing to marry local women are expected to pay for an elaborate banquet and to have purchased a new home to live in after the wedding. 'This is why they try to import women from neighboring countries, including Vietnam'" (para 16).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-1

"Some escape to back to Vietnam with help from the authorities. But cracking down on trafficking is no easy matter, as the mountainous terrain of Northern Vietnam makes it difficult to monitor the border" (para 12).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: ISSA-PRACTICE-1, ISSA-DATA-2, GIC-LAW-1

"Young Vietnamese women are valuable commodities in China, where the one-child policy and long-standing preference for sons has heavily skewed the gender ratio" (para 6).
Dec. 21, 2017, 2:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Vietnamese girls as young as 13 are taken to China by human traffickers, to be sold as brides" (para 8). "Girls trafficked from Vietnam can be sold as brides for $3,000 or more to the end buyer" (para 10). "Trafficked girls not forced into marriage typically end up as sex workers" (para 12). "She says that Vietnamese brides can sell for upwards of $3,000 to the end buyer and that they are often considered desirable because of cultural similarities to the Chinese" (para 17).