The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Egypt

Sept. 1, 2017, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: LO-SCALE-3

3.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 8:51 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: LO-SCALE-2

1.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: LO-SCALE-1

2.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: IRP-DATA-2

"Hundreds of under-age Egyptian girls enter temporary marriages with rich tourists from the Persian Gulf during the summer in return for money for their families. These unions – dubbed summer marriages – are not legally binding and end when the foreigners return to their own countries" (para 1). "There are no official figures, but NGOs estimate that thousands of men continue to come to Egypt each year in the search for a summer bride" (para 11).
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"It was a summer′s day in 2008 when someone knocked at the door. Howeida was 15 years old at the time. A man stood in the doorway. He spoke briefly to her father and her step-mother. Then the matter was settled: Howeida would be married to a man from Saudi Arabia for a sum of around 1750 euros. The 'marriage' lasted a whole 20 days, during which Howeida was repeatedly raped. Then, the man simply departed. His summer vacation was over" (para 2).
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The same cannot be said for the intermediary. In 2012, Moselhy, the lawyer, took the matchmaker 'Ousha' and her accomplices to court – a total of eleven persons. They received prison sentences ranging from six months to 18 years. The charge was human trafficking" (para 11).
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: IRP-PRACTICE-1

"Hundreds of under-age Egyptian girls enter temporary marriages with rich tourists from the Persian Gulf during the summer in return for money for their families. These unions – dubbed summer marriages – are not legally binding and end when the foreigners return to their own countries" (para 1). "It was a summer′s day in 2008 when someone knocked at the door. Howeida was 15 years old at the time. A man stood in the doorway. He spoke briefly to her father and her step-mother. Then the matter was settled: Howeida would be married to a man from Saudi Arabia for a sum of around 1750 euros. The 'marriage' lasted a ...more
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-1

"Hundreds of under-age Egyptian girls enter temporary marriages with rich tourists from the Persian Gulf during the summer in return for money for their families. These unions – dubbed summer marriages – are not legally binding and end when the foreigners return to their own countries. It was a summer′s day in 2008 when someone knocked at the door. Howeida was 15 years old at the time. A man stood in the doorway. He spoke briefly to her father and her step-mother. Then the matter was settled: Howeida would be married to a man from Saudi Arabia for a sum of around 1750 euros. The 'marriage' lasted a whole 20 ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:52 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"Freedom House claims that there is no law in Egypt that prohibits marital rape" (p 7)
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:49 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"Spousal rape is not illegal, and the penal code allows for leniency in so-called honor killings" (p 33)
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

“Girls identified the ring road that splits the focus area, Ezbet Khirallah [in Cairo], into two areas as the highest risk for their safety. … The tunnels that run under the road that link girls to schools and other areas in the community are poorly lit, long, have sewage floods, and are poorly maintained, putting girls at risk of sexual harassment when having to use them” (20). “Adolescent girls in Cairo also considered the kinds of businesses in the area that they passed on the way to their schools, workplaces, or markets to be a source for their feelings of insecurity. They noted that there are clusters of workshops, including ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

“It is important to note that the language used by girls participating in the study was often euphemistic in nature. Words like ‘assault’ and ‘harassment’ were replaced in favour of terms such as ‘eve-teasing’ (in Delhi) and ‘inappropriate touches’ (in Cairo). This suggests that with these watered-down terms girls might be unwilling to make strong claims against the perpetrators of this harassment. This could be due to a fear of speaking out against them, or a fear of people blaming them for the harassment and saying that they brought it upon themselves, leading to their re-victimisation” (29).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

“In Cairo, this same sense of exclusion from their own families was similarly felt. Girls here sometimes reported their inability to confide in family members when facing problems, in particular sexual harassment. Their reasons were fear of people blaming them, fear of being prevented from leaving home, fear of fights, and fear of damaging their family’s reputation. Sometimes, though, they were often afraid not of their families, but for their families – they were afraid their fathers and brothers would try to fight the harasser and end up getting hurt” (28). “In all of the cities, girls said that they did not feel included in decision-making processes at home or ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-4

“Girls here [Cairo] sometimes reported their inability to confide in family members when facing problems, in particular sexual harassment. Their reasons were fear of people blaming them, fear of being prevented from leaving home, fear of fights, and fear of damaging their family’s reputation. Sometimes, though, they were often afraid not of their families, but for their families – they were afraid their fathers and brothers would try to fight the harasser and end up getting hurt” (28).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-3

“This issue of decision-making and inclusion were often highlighted by girls in all five cities. In Cairo for example, they were mentioned as frequently as safety issues and incidences of sexual harassment. Girls placed a great deal of emphasis on their ‘inclusion and decision-making’ … They often spoke of feeling under-appreciated and that their opinions were overlooked and disregarded. … Often because of no fault of their own, in each of the cities girls are relegated to passive observers or beneficiaries of the system rather than being consulted and valued as the agents of change” (27). “Adolescent girls in Cairo felt that they were never consulted in decisions that affect ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Their [adolescent girls’] worlds tended to revolve mainly around their families, especially their mothers and friends, and the places they go are usually limited to their homes, school or work, market places, and mosques” (20). “Girls identified the ring road that splits the focus area, Ezbet Khirallah, into two areas as the highest risk for their safety. The only link between Ezbet Khirallah and outer Cairo is the road itself and tunnels built under it, which pose high risks for community members. The road poses a constant risk of accidents for girls who have to use transportation for going to school or work. The tunnels that run under the road ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Girls [in Cairo] who go to school took longer paths that often went outside the community and have to use transportation daily. This makes their safety issues not limited to areas around their house, but spreading further and covering more ground. For example, harassment was found to be a more common problem outside participating girls’ schools than around their workplaces or homes" (33).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: ISSA-DATA-2

“Ezbet Khirallah … is one of the largest informal settlements in Cairo. There are 650,000 people residing there, of which 55% are women” (19).
Aug. 25, 2017, 1:11 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: CBMC-DATA-1

“Less than 1 percent of children are born out of wedlock in … Egypt” (para 12).
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: INFIB-SCALE-1

4
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: AFE-SCALE-1

0.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DACH-SCALE-1

1.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: BR-SCALE-1

1.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DACH-SCALE-2

1.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DACH-SCALE-1

1.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-4

8.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: INFIB-SCALE-1

4.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: MARR-SCALE-3

8.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: GP-SCALE-1

3.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: PW-SCALE-1

3.0