The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Ethiopia

Feb. 15, 2020, 6:34 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

The gender parity index for gross secondary school enrollment (i.e. the ratio of girls to boys enrolled at the secondary level) is 0.96171 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Feb. 7, 2020, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

"In the northern part of the country, sons and daughters had an equal right to inherit land since lineage could be traced through their father and mother to claim land, i.e. cognatic descent. In practice, however, given the prevalent patrilocal marriage system, women’s rights to land were often ignored or implicitly traded in exchange for family support" (para 15)
Feb. 7, 2020, 11:28 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IW-PRACTICE-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1

"Muslim married women have rights over one-eighth of livestock and their by-products. Upon the husband’s death, a widow may be required to marry one of the brothers-in-law in order to continue the family blood line" (para 14)
Feb. 7, 2020, 11:18 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"Customary inheritance laws follow a patrilineal inheritance system which privilege men. More specifically, the oldest or unmarried son is more likely to inherit land from his parents while daughters in the Oromiya region cannot inherit their parents’ property because it is believed that their wealth is at their husbands’ homes. In Gambella, women do not inherit property unless there are no sons, the daughters are too old to remarry or the women have sons who are minors. In Amhara, which is predominantly inhabited by Christians, women can inherit only if there are no brothers or parents" (para 13)
Feb. 7, 2020, 11:11 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

"Inheritance legal mechanisms - Civil Code, 1960: - Art. 842: states that the children of the deceased are the first to be called to succeed. Each descendant receives equal shares of the succession. - Art. 837: declares that 'sex, age and nationality of the heir shall not affect in any way the ascertainment of rights to succession.' Proclamation to amend the Proclamation No. 56/2002, 70/2003, 103/2005 of Oromia Rural Land Use and Administration Proclamation (No. 130 /2007) - Strengthens inheritance rights in the form of use rights of land within the family, giving equal rights to inheritance for sons and daughters" (para 37-41)
Feb. 7, 2020, 11:02 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IW-PRACTICE-1

"Further, there are reports that, in some instances, widows are obliged to marry a male relative of the deceased spouse" (2)
Feb. 7, 2020, 11 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAW-LAW-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1

"Although Article 35 of the Constitution grants women and men equal rights in matters of inheritance, traditional customs vary by region but usually pass land to sons, on the grounds that daughters eventually move to their husbands’ homes. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization, sons and daughters have equal rights to inheritance in the Northern part of the country, where lineage is traced through both the mother and the father. However, in practice, women’s land rights are often ignored" (1-2)
Feb. 7, 2020, 10:51 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

"In the Southern Region, and in particular among the Dorze ethnic group, a woman is not allowed to inherit anything. If her husband dies and she has children, she will be allowed to stay in the matrimonial home until her children are grown up. Should she want to remarry during this time, the new husband may not live with her, but must live in a separate house nearby" (54)
Feb. 7, 2020, 10:50 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"Although men provide cultivation or usufructuary rights to their wives, daughters and other female relatives during their lifetimes, at their death only sons and other male relatives assume control and ownership of housing and land. Wives and daughters almost never inherit land allocated to households" (53)
Feb. 7, 2020, 10:49 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"In matters of inheritance, she is not to be discriminated against. Both legitimate and illegitimate children are entitled to inherit. The Civil Code makes no other specific provision as regards inheritance" (52)
Feb. 7, 2020, 10:39 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-2, PW-LAW-1

"For example, although the Constitution prohibits bigamy, polygamous marriages are very common in the southern region" (para 19)
Feb. 7, 2020, 10:38 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: LO-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-2

"Laws related to marriage, ownership and inheritance rights remain ineffective because they often conflict with predominant social practices. For example, although the Constitution prohibits bigamy, polygamous marriages are very common in the southern region. Only the first wife is given the right to place her name beside her husband's on land registration and certification forms, while the right to land ownership for polygamous wives remains marginalized" (para 19)
Feb. 7, 2020, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

"Women's rights to land are sidelined despite the legal provisions that envisage joint ownership of husbands and wives. In practice, issues related to the rights of widows, divorced women and polygamous wives are ignored" (para 18)
Feb. 7, 2020, 10:30 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: POLY-LAW-2

“Polygamous marriages make the issue of land rights complex, especially in the division of use rights among several women. In practice, the oldest wife has access to land because only one wife is allowed to register. Such use rights are vulnerable and are subject to contestation upon dissolution of marriage. In the SNNPR and Oromiya regions, polygamous wives' resistance has resulted in a change in the registration and certification system so that the husband's name can be included on the certificate with his first wife and with his later wives" (para 10-11)
Feb. 7, 2020, 10:30 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: POLY-LAW-2

“Polygamous marriages make the issue of land rights complex, especially in the division of use rights among several women. In practice, the oldest wife has access to land because only one wife is allowed to register. Such use rights are vulnerable and are subject to contestation upon dissolution of marriage. In the SNNPR and Oromiya regions, polygamous wives' resistance has resulted in a change in the registration and certification system so that the husband's name can be included on the certificate with his first wife and with his later wives" (para 10-11)
Dec. 18, 2019, 5:05 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chad, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Macedonia, Madagascar, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Qatar, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Solomon Islands, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: TRAFF-SCALE-1

2.0
Dec. 7, 2019, 10:43 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"Proportions of women in parliament in East Africa … Ethiopia at 37.2 percent" (3).
Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Guyana, Iceland, Iraq, Italy, Kazakhstan, Laos, Latvia, Macedonia, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, South Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tanzania, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

1.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Angola, Bahamas, Benin, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Congo, D R Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea-Bissau, Iceland, Laos, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, North Korea, Peru, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

0.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The 2015 anti-trafficking proclamation, No.909/2015, criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking, and prescribed penalties of 15 to 25 years’ imprisonment and a fine of 150,000 to 300,000 Ethiopian birr ($5,350 to $10,700) for offenses involving an adult male victim, and 25 years to life imprisonment and a fine of 200,000 to 500,000 Ethiopian birr ($7,130 to $17,830) for those involving an adult female victim or a child victim. These penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with those prescribed for other serious crimes, such as rape" (200)
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"During the year, the government collaborated with an international organization to repatriate and provide assistance for more than 2,600 Ethiopians from Saudi Arabia, a small fraction of the overall returnees from this Gulf state. Since the government lacked funding to repatriate all of its nationals, it assisted with victim identification services in respective countries and sometimes negotiated discounted air fares for returnees. Some Ethiopian diplomatic missions in the Gulf states had shelters for victims on respective mission compounds where they could stay temporarily, and the missions engaged with host government authorities on behalf of victims" (200-201).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"In Ethiopia, traffickers often deceive parents of children living in rural areas into sending their children to major cities to work as domestic workers. The traffickers promise families that the children will go to school and receive wages for their work, thereby enabling them to send money home" (11-12). "As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Ethiopia, and traffickers exploit victims from Ethiopia abroad. Scarce economic opportunities and dire poverty coupled with familial encouragement compels thousands of Ethiopians, including a substantial percentage of individuals under age 30 and unmarried, to transit, primarily via Djibouti or Somalia, to Yemen and onward to Saudi...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Ethiopia does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Ethiopia remained on Tier 2. These efforts included assisting in the interception of more than 10,000 individuals vulnerable to trafficking and convicting an increased number of traffickers. The government also improved oversight of overseas recruitment agencies and amplified awareness across the country on trafficking and trafficking-related crimes through its community dialogue program. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government did not sufficiently address internal trafficking,...more
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Cuba, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Georgia, Ghana, Indonesia, Israel, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Libya, Lithuania, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Suriname, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

3.0
July 23, 2019, 2:22 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

"In Ethiopia, traffickers often deceive parents of children living in rural areas into sending their children to major cities to work as domestic workers. The traffickers promise families that the children will go to school and receive wages for their work, thereby enabling them to send money home" (11-12).
July 14, 2019, 11:37 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1

"The penal code criminalizes the practice of clitoridectomy and provides for three months or a fine of at least 500 birr ($22) for convicted perpetrators. Conviction of infibulation of the genitals (the most extreme and dangerous form of FGM/C) is punishable by five to 10 years’ imprisonment. According to government sources, there has never been a criminal charge regarding FGM/C, but media reported limited application of the law" (p. 28).
July 14, 2019, 11:37 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: DV-LAW-2

"Depending on the severity of injury inflicted, penalties for conviction range from small fines to 15 years’ imprisonment" (p. 28).
July 14, 2019, 11:37 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-1

"The law provides for one year in prison and a fine of 10,000 birr ($444) for conviction of trafficking in indecent material displaying sexual intercourse by minors" (p. 30).
July 14, 2019, 11:37 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"School enrollment rate was 90 percent of boys and 84 percent of girls" (p. 30). "According to the 2010 Population Council Young Adult Survey, 23 percent of girls with disabilities were in school, compared with 48 percent of girls and 55 percent of boys without disabilities" (p. 32).
July 14, 2019, 11:37 a.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Traffickers recruited girls as young as age 11 to work in brothels. Young girls were trafficked from rural to urban areas and exploited as prostitutes in hotels, bars, resort towns, and rural truck stops" (p. 30).