The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for India

Nov. 10, 2017, 11:12 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"The campaign [which raised awareness and provided training] was greeted with skepticism by many women. It also initially raised some hostility from men, as it was seen as intruding on 'male territory.' Meetings and the work of the women technicians improving water supply, however, gradually led women to gain confidence and men to accept the role of women in water maintenance, and to encourage them to participate in the program.Ten years after the launch of the campaign, it involved 30,000 women across 500 villages in Gujarat. Time previously dedicated to fetching water is now devoted to mostly productive activities, leading to increased incomes. In addition, women have demonstrated their ability ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 11:09 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-2

"The Self Employed Women’s Association (SEWA) launched its Women, Work and Water Campaign in Gujarat in western India in 1995. The campaign aimed at improving access to water primarily for domestic use and to some extent for agricultural irrigation, in order to relieve women from the time-consuming chore of fetching water"(7)
Nov. 10, 2017, 11:05 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"The Self Employed Women’s Association (SEWA) launched its Women, Work and Water Campaign in Gujarat in western India in 1995. The campaign aimed at improving access to water primarily for domestic use and to some extent for agricultural irrigation, in order to relieve women from the time-consuming chore of fetching water. The campaign included: awareness-raising and training; establishment of local water users’ groups (pani samitis), composed of a majority of women, for the management of community water sources; capacity building for women, including for the maintenance and repair of water pumps; and the improvement of water supply systems with small infrastructure works such as roof rainwater harvesting systems, rural piped ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:57 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"A study on the Indian state of Gujarat estimated that reducing to 1 hour a day the time spent fetching water by women would allow the women to increase their incomes by $100 yearly using the time saved (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP] 2006)"(3)."It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:52 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"A study on the Indian state of Gujarat estimated that reducing to 1 hour a day the time spent fetching water by women would allow the women to increase their incomes by $100 yearly using the time saved (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP] 2006)"(3)."It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:49 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"A study on the Indian state of Gujarat estimated that reducing to 1 hour a day the time spent fetching water by women would allow the women to increase their incomes by $100 yearly using the time saved (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP] 2006)"(3)."It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"A study on the Indian state of Gujarat estimated that reducing to 1 hour a day the time spent fetching water by women would allow the women to increase their incomes by $100 yearly using the time saved (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP] 2006)"(3)."It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-2, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"But Nidhi Gupta from the Takshashila Institute, a thinktank, said the law was a step in the right direction despite its limitations.She said: 'Women bring as much skill and talent to the table as men do. We go to the best schools, best colleges, as we are as talented and skilled as men are. So why should we be excluded'"(para 20-21)
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"According to women’s groups, the new rules – which raise maternity leave from 12 to 26 weeks, putting India ahead of France and the US – will apply only to a small fraction of the female workforce.'It’s as if, for the government, 95% of India’s women don’t even exist,' said Juin Dutta, from Paatshala, a group helping impoverished female handicraft workers. She pointed out that the extension will only apply to women in the formal sector, which amounts to just 5% of India’s working women"(para 2-3)."Pratibha R, of the Garment and Textile Workers Union in Bangalore, said the [maternity leave] bill did little to resolve the problems of working mothers. ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"'In the informal sector, you never have to sign a formal employment contract and your relationship with the employer is unclear. For example if women work as maids – and up to 10 million Indian women work as domestic cleaners or cooks – they will not have signed a contract. They have a verbal agreement, so in reality they are not really covered by formal rules and are not recognised by law'"(para 8)."She [Naiyya Saggi, founder of BabyChakra, India’s largest online community of mothers] said women still feel taking any time off would have a negative impact on their careers. 'Six months is a long time in today’s world, with ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2, ERBG-DATA-2

"Internationally, the bill [raising maternity leave from 12 to 26 weeks for women in the formal sector] has been touted as a success for India, which has one of the world’s lowest female employment rates – 25% – and where mothers often feel under pressure to leave their jobs after having children"(para 6)
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"A survey by the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry suggests that a quarter of women in India don’t return to work after having their babies"(para 12)
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Campaigners brand maternity bill elitist over failure to include women working in India’s informal sector, who represent 95% of female workforce"(para 1)."According to women’s groups, the new rules – which raise maternity leave from 12 to 26 weeks, putting India ahead of France and the US – will apply only to a small fraction of the female workforce.'It’s as if, for the government, 95% of India’s women don’t even exist,' said Juin Dutta, from Paatshala, a group helping impoverished female handicraft workers. She pointed out that the extension will only apply to women in the formal sector, which amounts to just 5% of India’s working women.India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: GIC-LAW-1

"According to women’s groups, the new rules – which raise maternity leave from 12 to 26 weeks, putting India ahead of France and the US – will apply only to a small fraction of the female workforce.'It’s as if, for the government, 95% of India’s women don’t even exist,' said Juin Dutta, from Paatshala, a group helping impoverished female handicraft workers. She pointed out that the extension will only apply to women in the formal sector, which amounts to just 5% of India’s working women"(para 2-3)."But most Indian women will never reap the benefits [of the maternity leave bill], according to the International Labour Organisation. 'India’s informal economy is huge, ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3

"Pratibha R, of the Garment and Textile Workers Union in Bangalore, said the [maternity leave] bill did little to resolve the problems of working mothers. 'Our members are entitled to the 26 weeks, but what happens after? According to the new law, workplaces are supposed to provide creches on site, and women are supposed to be able to go see their babies four times a day, but in practice that doesn’t happen.The facilities provided are unclean and low quality, women don’t feel comfortable leaving their babies there. Women are very afraid to leave small babies there, and so they just leave after pregnancy.' A survey by the Associated Chambers of ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"'The basic aim [of the new maternity bill which increases maternity leave from 12 to 26 weeks for women working in the formal sector] is to ensure proper care of the newborn, the future citizen of India, from the time of birth,' he [Prime Minister Narendra Modi] said. 'The newborn should get the complete love and attention of the mother. That is how these children will become true assets of the country when they grow up. Mothers too will remain healthy'"(para 5)."But most Indian women will never reap the benefits [of the maternity leave bill], according to the International Labour Organisation. 'India’s informal economy is huge, it employs over 435 ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3

"But increasing female participation in India is complex, said economist Rupa Subramanya. Maternity benefits may make women more willing to work, but they also make employers less willing to hire them"(para 14)."LocalCircles, a citizen engagement organisation that surveyed more than 4,000 small businesses about the new maternity rules, found that 26% of firms said they would favour men over women because of the new rules.Yatish Rajawat, chief strategy officer for LocalCircles, said: 'There is a lot of political correctness on hiring for diversity. Many people say something and do the opposite. The fact is that business dynamics will take over politically ‘right’ things. Now businesses are looking at women and ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ERBG-DATA-5

"Campaigners brand maternity bill elitist over failure to include women working in India’s informal sector, who represent 95% of female workforce"(para 1)."According to women’s groups, the new rules – which raise maternity leave from 12 to 26 weeks, putting India ahead of France and the US – will apply only to a small fraction of the female workforce.'It’s as if, for the government, 95% of India’s women don’t even exist,' said Juin Dutta, from Paatshala, a group helping impoverished female handicraft workers. She pointed out that the extension will only apply to women in the formal sector, which amounts to just 5% of India’s working women"(para 2-3)."'In the informal sector, ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"The Indian government’s new maternity bill, which comes into force this week, has been branded an elitist policy that will do little or nothing to help the vast majority of the country’s mothers.According to women’s groups, the new rules – which raise maternity leave from 12 to 26 weeks, putting India ahead of France and the US – will apply only to a small fraction of the female workforce.'It’s as if, for the government, 95% of India’s women don’t even exist,' said Juin Dutta, from Paatshala, a group helping impoverished female handicraft workers. She pointed out that the extension will only apply to women in the formal sector, which amounts ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 4:36 p.m.
Countries: India, Nepal, Pakistan
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-2

"Motives cited for acid attacks often include rejection of sexual advances or marriage proposals. These reasons appear to be common particularly in Bangladesh, Colombia, India, Nepal and Pakistan" (para 9).
Oct. 19, 2017, 12:09 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"India's 2011 census showed more than 5 million girls were married before the legal age of 18" (para 3). "More than a quarter of Indian women between 20 and 24 said they were married before 18, and a fifth of men between 25 and 29 said they married below the legal age, the National Commission for the Protection of Child Rights and the charity Young Lives said in a recent report analysing the census data" (para 13). "The study, the first to break down India's census data on child marriage, found that nearly one in four girls in rural areas and one in five in urban areas married before 18" ...more
Oct. 19, 2017, 12:09 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"Marital rape is not a crime in India and the government has said its criminalisation could destabalise marriages and make men vulnerable to harassment by their wives" (para 4).
Oct. 19, 2017, 12:09 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-LAW-1

"Marriages in India are considered to involve a child if the woman is below 18 or the man younger than 21. Men both above and below the legal age may marry child brides" (para 12).
Oct. 19, 2017, 12:09 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"India's top court has ruled that men who have sex with their child brides can be prosecuted for rape" (para 1).
Oct. 19, 2017, 12:09 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Though illegal, child marriage is deeply rooted in India. Factors such as poverty, weak law enforcement, patriarchal social norms and concerns about family honour are often blamed" (para 11). "More than a quarter of Indian women between 20 and 24 said they were married before 18, and a fifth of men between 25 and 29 said they married below the legal age, the National Commission for the Protection of Child Rights and the charity Young Lives said in a recent report analysing the census data. The number of underage brides has declined 0.3 percent in rural areas since 2001, but in urban areas it increased 0.7 percent, the report said. ...more
Oct. 19, 2017, 12:09 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"India's top court has ruled that men who have sex with their child brides can be prosecuted for rape. Though the legal age of consent is 18 in India, an exception had previously been made for sex between a man and his wife when the woman was between 15 and 17" (para 1-2). "The Supreme Court ruled the age of consent was 18 for 'all purposes' after hearing a petition by Independent Thought, a non-profit group that sought to criminalise sex with underaged wives. 'Sexual intercourse by a married man with their minor wife below 18 years is rape,' the court said in its judgment" (para 5-6).
Oct. 17, 2017, 7:03 a.m.
Countries: Ghana, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa
Variables: SMES-DATA-1

"Earnings [among street vendors] also vary according to marital status: widows have the lowest median monthly earnings (68 USD) and those who never married have the highest (101 USD)" (12). This data is based on a survey of street venders that was conducted in Accra Ghana, Ahmedabad, India, Durban, South Africa, Lima, Peru and Nakuru, Kenya (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Oct. 17, 2017, 7 a.m.
Countries: Ghana, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Among street vendors in the five cities, men have significantly higher levels of education than women. While nearly one quarter of all women in the sample have no schooling at all, less than 1 per cent of men have no school at all; and more than half (56 per cent) of women have primary education or less, while one quarter of men have primary or less. Education levels are especially low in Ahmedabad, where 60 per cent of the all-female sample has never been to school" (11). This data is based on a survey of street venders that was conducted in Accra Ghana, Ahmedabad, India, Durban, South Africa, Lima, Peru ...more
Oct. 17, 2017, 6:57 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ERBG-DATA-5

"Among street vendors in the five cities, men have significantly higher levels of education than women. While nearly one quarter of all women in the sample have no schooling at all, less than 1 per cent of men have no school at all; and more than half (56 per cent) of women have primary education or less, while one quarter of men have primary or less. Education levels are especially low in Ahmedabad, where 60 per cent of the all-female sample has never been to school" (11). The survey was conducted in Accra Ghana, Ahmedabad, India, Durban, South Africa, Lima, Peru and Nakuru, Kenya (TPJ - CODER COMMENT). "Overall, women ...more
Oct. 5, 2017, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: WAM-DATA-2

"We learnt film making…shooting…editing. How does climate change impact our farming. We knew about it, but we did not have tools to express it. The government in Delhi how would they know about farming and other issues? Instead of documents, we felt through films we could convey our thoughts more effectively" (1). This is a quote from a female farmer at 8:20 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).