The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Iran

Feb. 6, 2019, 7:03 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: GP-DATA-2

There is a "Islamic Republic's Cultural and Social Council for Women" (para. 6).
Feb. 6, 2019, 7:03 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Rouhafza, who is in charge of planning and policy for the council, declined to provide evidence of her claims about Iran’s young women, saying the statistics are available, but it would be irresponsible to make them public" (para. 8).
Feb. 6, 2019, 7:03 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, AOM-DATA-2

"Ms. Seyavoshi announced that more than 300 girls under nine, and between 30,000 to 40,000 girls under 13-14 years old marry in Iran" (para. 5). "According to Iran’s Association of Children’s Rights, the number of girls married in Iran under the age of 15 climbed from 33,383 in 2006 to 43,459 in 2009, a 30 percent increase in three years. Experts say the increase is due to deepening poverty and parents’ desire to control their daughter’s sexuality" (para. 11).
Feb. 6, 2019, 7:03 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: MARR-LAW-1

"A parliamentary motion banning child marriage in Iran has been rejected by Majles (parliament)" (para. 1). "The Islamic Republic’s civil code stipulates that the legal age of marriage in Iran is thirteen for girls and fifteen for boys. However, the civil code allows girls as young as nine to marry with the consent of their father or the permission of a judge" (para. 12).
Feb. 6, 2019, 7:03 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"The Islamic Republic’s civil code stipulates that the legal age of marriage in Iran is thirteen for girls and fifteen for boys. However, the civil code allows girls as young as nine to marry with the consent of their father or the permission of a judge" (para. 12).
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:41 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"5.9% of seats in the lower/single house of Iran (17 out of 289 total seats) are held by women"
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"9.7% of ministerial positions in Iran (3 out of 31 total positions) are held by women"
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Bangladesh, Benin, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cape Verde, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Moldova, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nepal, North Korea, Oman, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Korea, South Sudan, Sudan, Thailand, Ukraine, United States, Yemen
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-4

1.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Bangladesh, Burma/Myanmar, Chile, Costa Rica, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, North Korea, Oman, Paraguay, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, South Sudan, Sudan, Thailand, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-2

1.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Fiji, Iran
Variables: MURDER-DATA-4

According to calculations based on the WHO Homicide Estimates for 2015, the homicide rate for females aged 15-44 is 1.55 per 100,000 female population ages 15-44.
Jan. 16, 2019, 8:21 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: SUICIDE-DATA-1

According to Countryeconomy.com, the total suicide rate for women in Iran in 2015 was 2.83 per 100,000 total female population (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:53 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"According to one survey that was conducted back in the 1980s, 66% of Iranian women have been, at least once, subjected to domestic violence. This is while there are no [current] laws that protect women against such incidents" (Para 18).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:53 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Vice President for Women’s and Family Affairs Masoumeh Ebtekar spoke with the Etemad daily July 7 regarding the possibility that the bill will not advance due to opposition from Islamic jurists. 'One of the issues that we talked about during the session we had with the supreme leader was the issue of domestic violence, the importance of paying attention to it, and the importance of drafting law that would prevent domestic violence from taking place,' she said. 'The supreme leader also emphasized the importance of this issue'" (Para 14). "Last year, on Nov. 25, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, a group of activists in Iran...more
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:53 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: GP-DATA-3

"'Ever since we started our term, we have been waiting for this bill,' said Iranian parliamentarian Tayyebeh Siavoshi of the Provision of Security for Women Bill, which expands the legal definition of violence against women. 'Both we and the Vice Presidency for Women and Family Affairs have repeatedly asked the judiciary to send this bill to the parliament. It has been almost three years and we have yet to receive this bill'" (Para 1).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:53 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"Iranian parliamentarians originally discussed the importance of drafting this bill back in December 2012, during President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s last year in office. After President Hassan Rouhani took office in August 2013, following up on this bill became a priority of the Vice Presidency for Women and Family Affairs. The Rouhani administration eventually approved the bill in May 2017. Then, due to its judicial nature, the bill was sent to the judiciary for approval. Since then, the bill has been awaiting the signature of judiciary head Sadeq Amoli Larijani. Now, Siavoshi says the judiciary has omitted 41 of the 92 articles of the bill. According to her, the judiciary finished reviewing...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"As the protests in Iran dominated international news in early January, an editor of Grazia asked Farian Sabahi, a historian who specializes in Iran and the Middle East, to comment on the protests ravaging her country. Sabahi penned a piece that focused on the role of women in the demonstrations, underlining that they wanted the same thing as male demonstrators — more jobs and more political rights. She said that even though the women’s question remains an important one in Iran, the uprising was not directly triggered by the compulsory veil, or hijab. She also referred to the 'white veil' photo in the media that showed an unnamed woman stood...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"As the protests in Iran dominated international news in early January, an editor of Grazia asked Farian Sabahi, a historian who specializes in Iran and the Middle East, to comment on the protests ravaging her country. Sabahi penned a piece that focused on the role of women in the demonstrations, underlining that they wanted the same thing as male demonstrators — more jobs and more political rights. She said that even though the women’s question remains an important one in Iran, the uprising was not directly triggered by the compulsory veil, or hijab. She also referred to the 'white veil' photo in the media that showed an unnamed woman stood...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"As local and politically outspoken women are a Western media clickbait favorite, women’s images and statements are frequently used in the stories about protests even if few women are present. The veil, even when it is a minor player, seems to have become a reductive symbol of women's participation in wider movements. According to Mahnaz Shirali, a researcher at Sciences Po Paris and author of 'The Mystery of Contemporary Iran,' the coverage of the Iranian protests in European and American media has indeed often been 'partial and sometimes superficial.' 'It’s true that the question of the veil is important and a symbol of the regime's repression, but Iranian society's —...more
Jan. 7, 2019, 9:37 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"A Facebook page called 'My Stealthy Freedom,' started in 2014 by New York-based Iranian activist Masih Alinejad, features photos and videos of women defying Iran's headscarf law. Facebook and Twitter are banned in the Islamic Republic, but many Iranians access the social media sites through private online networks that mask users' locations, ducking the censors. Other popular platforms like Instagram have also been blocked temporarily from time to time — 'to keep the peace,' according to authorities" (para 13-14).
Jan. 7, 2019, 9:37 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"In late 2017, police said they would stop arresting people for dress code violations. But harassment of women by the 'morality police' continued" (para 23).
Jan. 7, 2019, 9:37 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"Ordinary Iranians are mounting protests that refuse to go away, despite a sharp response from the authorities. The demonstrations began to make news late last year, focusing largely on economic hardship. As those protests continued in cities around the country, another movement re-emerged: young women standing up against the enforcement of conservative Muslim strictures on their dress and behavior. Similar protests have gone on for years, sometimes unnoticed outside Iran" (para 2-4). "Atefeh Ahmadi, a 29-year-old freelance translator from Tehran, says she was intrigued when she started seeing the resurgence of images and videos of women standing on electrical boxes in public squares and removing their headscarves. 'I saw the...more
Jan. 7, 2019, 9:37 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1

"Under Iran's strict interpretation of Islam that's melded with government since 1979, women and girls over the age of 9 are required to cover their heads and everything but the face and hands. Offenders face fines or jail time" (para 19). "In late 2017, police said they would stop arresting people for dress code violations. But harassment of women by the 'morality police' continued" (para 23).
Jan. 7, 2019, 9:37 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-3

"Atefeh Ahmadi, a 29-year-old freelance translator from Tehran, says she was intrigued when she started seeing the resurgence of images and videos of women standing on electrical boxes in public squares and removing their headscarves. 'I saw the videos and I thought to myself, this could do some good if it's an ongoing thing,' she tells NPR. So one day, she tried it herself, and the video and photographs of her went viral on social media. Then on March 8 — International Women's Day — she tried a new kind of protest. 'Me and two of my friends went to the subway,' she says. 'We sat in the women-only car...more
Dec. 20, 2018, 6:16 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: MURDER-DATA-4

According to the WHO violence and homocide statistics, the total femicide rate as of 2015 was 1.4 per 100,000 female population. For ages 15-44, the rate was calculated to be 0.85 per 100,000 female population.
Dec. 11, 2018, 4:32 p.m.
Countries: Iran, Israel
Variables: MURDER-DATA-3

According to the data chart, the female homicide rate in 2014 was 0.58 per 100,000 population.
Dec. 1, 2018, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: IIP-LAW-1, RISW-PRACTICE-2

"Iran's prosecutor general said today that women would not be allowed to watch live football matches inside stadiums again, because seeing the players will 'lead to sin'" (para 1).
Dec. 1, 2018, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Women have been barred from attending men's football matches since the 1979 Islamic revolution, with religious leaders claiming that women need to be protected from the masculine atmosphere and the sight of semi-clad men. They have also worried about bodily contact between the genders in crowds as people leave sporting arenas" (6, 7).
Dec. 1, 2018, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"'I object to the presence of women in Azadi Stadium yesterday. We are a Muslim state, we are Muslims,' Montazeri said, according to the conservative Mehr news agency. 'We will deal with any official who wants to allow women inside stadiums under any pretext,' he added. 'When a woman goes to a stadium and is faced with half-naked men in sports clothes and sees them it will lead to sin'" (para 3, 4, 5). "Women have been barred from attending men's football matches since the 1979 Islamic revolution, with religious leaders claiming that women need to be protected from the masculine atmosphere and the sight of semi-clad men. They have...more
Nov. 13, 2018, 1:46 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Argentina, Bangladesh, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Colombia, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lesotho, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela
Variables: BR-SCALE-1

1.0
Oct. 31, 2018, 2:32 p.m.
Countries: Iran, Tunisia
Variables: BR-DATA-1

According to 2018 data from the U.S. Census Bureau International base, the birth rate is 17.4 per 1000 population.