The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Iraq

Nov. 3, 2017, 10:52 a.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"In the Middle East and North Africa, seven countries or autonomous regions have legislation or regulations on domestic violence: Algeria, Bahrain, Iraqi Kurdistan, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia"(4)
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:51 a.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"In the Middle East and North Africa, seven countries or autonomous regions have legislation or regulations on domestic violence: Algeria, Bahrain, Iraqi Kurdistan, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia"(4)
Oct. 24, 2017, 11:33 a.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-1

"She added that the number of abducted women exceeded 4,000" (para 4).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"Nongovernmental organizations were providing some psychosocial services and employed psychologists at some displaced people’s camps" (para 42). The people targeted in this campaign were Yazidi women who had been kidnapped, raped and enslaved by the Islamic State (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: ABO-DATA-1

"Women and girls who have become pregnant as a result of rape during captivity have not been able to access safe and legal abortions" (para 47).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: ABO-LAW-1

"safe and legal abortion services are not available" (para 15). "The Iraqi government should amend the penal code, at least to allow safe and legal abortions for women and girls who have experienced sexual violence and who wish to terminate their pregnancies" (para 47).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"Eleven of those interviewed reported restricted access to health care or education because of discriminatory ISIS policies, including rules limiting male doctors from touching, seeing, or being alone with female patients" (para 6). "Women and girls faced further barriers because of restrictions imposed by ISIS. Fearful of punishment, the women said, most male doctors would not examine female patients. One woman from the village of Kubaiba said a doctor would not examine her daughter, who she feared had typhoid, leaving it to the girl to describe her symptoms. Another said her doctor asked her to open her mouth and then peered at her sore throat from across the room. In ...more
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1

"The women said they feared being beaten if they did not comply. More frequently, male relatives were punished for infringements of the dress code with 30 lashes or fines of 50,000-100,000 Iraqi dinars (US$45 to $90), or both" (para 49). This is a description of ISIS held territory in Iraq (TPJ - CODER COMMENT). "'My neighbors had to pay money just because they cleaned right outside their house without full niqab,' said a 44-year-old woman from the town of Riyadh. In some areas, including Hawija, foreign female ISIS fighters participating in a hisbah ('accountability') – which acts as a morality police force – policed women’s dress armed with metal prongs, ...more
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Eleven of those interviewed reported restricted access to health care or education because of discriminatory ISIS policies, including rules limiting male doctors from touching, seeing, or being alone with female patients. In more rural areas, ISIS has banned girls from attending school" (para 6). "ISIS gender-based restrictions have imposed particular barriers for girls. In the villages of Kubaiba, Madhuriyya, and Hababza, ISIS forced girls out of school, while allowing boys to attend, family members said. In Atshana, ISIS allowed girls to attend, but those over 12 were required to wear the niqab. In Mahhuriya, boys – but not girls – were allowed to travel out of the village to secondary ...more
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: SAB-PRACTICE-1

"Several women said that female hisbah [ISIS] officers monitored women’s clothing and behavior in clinics and hospitals. 'They hit my relative for breast-feeding in Hawija hospital,' a 50-year-old woman from Shirqat said" (para 58).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1

"They said they were only allowed to leave their houses dressed in full face veil (niqab) and accompanied by a close male relative" (para 4). "All 21 of the Sunni Arab women and girls Human Rights Watch interviewed reported being forced to wear the niqab, which covers body, face, and head, with veils over their eyes, gloves, and socks whenever they left their houses. All clothing had to be black and without decoration. Many said that with their eyes veiled, they could not see where they were going and sometimes stumbled and fell. Before ISIS took over their areas, they said, they wore headscarves with their faces showing, and colored ...more
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"They said they were only allowed to leave their houses dressed in full face veil (niqab) and accompanied by a close male relative" (para 4). "These restrictions have sharply reduced women’s ability to participate in their community. Many said that before ISIS took control, they had left their houses every day, to visit family or shop, but after ISIS arrived they only left once a month, or in some cases even less frequently" (para 52).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-2

"They said they were only allowed to leave their houses dressed in full face veil (niqab) and accompanied by a close male relative" (para 4). "All 21 of the Sunni Arab women and girls Human Rights Watch interviewed reported being forced to wear the niqab, which covers body, face, and head, with veils over their eyes, gloves, and socks whenever they left their houses. All clothing had to be black and without decoration. Many said that with their eyes veiled, they could not see where they were going and sometimes stumbled and fell. Before ISIS took over their areas, they said, they wore headscarves with their faces showing, and colored ...more
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"Two women said that when they or female relatives became pregnant, they went to local midwives rather than doctors because of the restrictions. One of the women said she suffered complications as a result of poor postpartum care" (para 57). ISIS has banned male doctors from examining female patients (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: SUICIDE-PRACTICE-1

"The government and aid agencies have begun establishing referral systems to ensure that women and girls in crisis in the camps can access care in emergencies. This facilitated, for example, the referral of about 20 women in the Kapartu camps to Azadi General Hospital between June and August, after they threatened or attempted suicide" (para 42). These Yazidi women were survivors of kidnapping, rape, and enslavement at the hands of ISIS (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"ISIS fighters and female ISIS 'morality police' hit, bit, or poked women with metal prongs to keep them in line, making them afraid to try to get services they needed" (para 6).
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-1

"Several of the Yezidis, abducted by ISIS in mid-2014, had spent more than a year in captivity. They described being forcibly converted to Islam, kept in sexual slavery, bought and sold in slave markets, and passed among as many as four ISIS members. Human Rights Watch first documented systematic rape of Yezidi women and girls in early 2015" (para 2). "KRG officials say that ISIS fighters in Iraq and Syria continue to hold about 1,800 abducted Yezidi women and girls" (para 9). "The abuses against Yezidi women and girls documented by Human Rights Watch, including the practice of abducting women and girls and forcibly converting them to Islam and/or forcibly ...more
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"Several of the Yezidis, abducted by ISIS in mid-2014, had spent more than a year in captivity. They described being forcibly converted to Islam, kept in sexual slavery, bought and sold in slave markets, and passed among as many as four ISIS members. Human Rights Watch first documented systematic rape of Yezidi women and girls in early 2015" (para 2). "The women and girls said ISIS bought and sold them repeatedly, often raped them, sometimes confined them in rooms for days, humiliated them, and beat their children or took away their children" (para 14). "A 30-year-old woman who escaped with three of her children in January 2016 said ISIS members ...more
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: MISA-PRACTICE-1

"Eleven staff of governmental and nongovernmental providers of mental health care and psychosocial support emphasized to Human Rights Watch that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health conditions are widespread among Yezidi women escapees and that there is a significant need for comprehensive, long-term medical care and psychosocial support for abduction and rape survivors. Dr. Nezar Ismet Taib, director general for health in Dohuk, and Dr. Adnan Assad Taha, head of the psychiatry department of Azadi General Hospital, said that the need for psychological support in Dohuk is likely to increase as the immediate needs for food and shelter for women and girls who have escaped ISIS are met" ...more
Oct. 3, 2017, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"Women and providers also identified a lack of outreach by providers; stigma surrounding mental health problems and rape; and a lack of knowledge about and understanding of services as barriers to care" (para 44).
Sept. 28, 2017, 8:56 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain, Iraq
Variables: LRW-LAW-4

"A survey of laws in 73 countries found rapists could avoid punishment if they married their victim in at least nine jurisdictions, including Bahrain, Iraq, Philippines, Tajikistan and Tunisia" (para 2). "Kirkland said Lebanon, Bahrain, Jordan and Iraq were discussing revising laws allowing rapists to escape justice" (para 18).
Sept. 25, 2017, 8:22 a.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-6

15.0
Sept. 9, 2017, 12:37 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Miad Jubouri, an Iraqi mother of five who joined the ranks of the Iraqi forces battling the Islamic State (IS), has been participating in the battle as part of the Lions of the Tigris faction for the past two years. In a patriotic and conservative Iraqi society, Jubouri’s fight alongside the male-dominated Iraqi security forces has caught the attention of both the community and the media" (para 1).
Sept. 9, 2017, 12:37 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-1

"Women in northern areas occupied by IS were captured by this extremist group and transported to Raqqa, which IS considers as the capital of its caliphate, where Yazidi women were sexually exploited in the most heinous of ways" (para 7). "'The UN stands in solidarity with women who have fallen victim to IS’ crimes, and we insist on holding the group accountable for the horrible crimes it has committed'" (para 8).
Sept. 9, 2017, 12:37 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: EWCMS-PRACTICE-1

"While Jubouri's participation on the battlefield is striking due to the conservative nature of Iraqi society, this phenomenon is on the rise. The number of women who have joined the Popular Mobilization Units (PMU) have increased, totaling roughly 3,000 women. In this context, Fatima Sultani, a PMU trainee, told Al-Monitor that women in the PMU provide 'service, media and medical assistance,' in reference to women’s roles in the security forces being mostly limited to logistical support. A report issued on June 28, 2014, on Kurdish female peshmerga fighters who battled IS in Taza Khormato town and Bashir village, near the northern city of Kirkuk, highlights the participation of Kurdish and ...more
Sept. 9, 2017, 12:37 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: EWCMS-LAW-1

"Miad Jubouri, an Iraqi mother of five who joined the ranks of the Iraqi forces battling the Islamic State (IS), has been participating in the battle as part of the Lions of the Tigris faction for the past two years. In a patriotic and conservative Iraqi society, Jubouri’s fight alongside the male-dominated Iraqi security forces has caught the attention of both the community and the media" (para 1). "Generally speaking, Iraqi women are fighting in the ranks of official organizations, under military command, which makes their mission noble. They are fighting to defend their country, not for personal revenge or terrorist motives, as is the case of women recruited by ...more
Sept. 9, 2017, 12:37 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: EWCMS-DATA-1

"The number of women who have joined the Popular Mobilization Units (PMU) have increased, totaling roughly 3,000 women" (para 2).
Sept. 9, 2017, 12:37 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-3

"Such concerns also reveal the motives behind making some 500 Kurdish women undergo intensive training in the northern city of Sulaimaniyah in August 2014, in preparation for any future battles. In addition, women’s participation in the fight against IS is a response to the group’s ability to recruit women and use them in its fights, media events and for logistical support, even though IS’ extremist ideologies state that women should be housewives and mothers. In addition, IS considers 9-year-old girls to be of 'legal age' to marry IS fighters. IS uses women in 'sexual jihad' as a means to attract new members, given how this is legitimate from a religious ...more
Sept. 1, 2017, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: LO-SCALE-3

3.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 8:51 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: LO-SCALE-2

1.0