The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Japan

April 10, 2018, 11:10 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ATC-DATA-6

According to the Institute of Inclusive Security, Japan launched their national action plan in 2015 (MB-Coder Comment).
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LRW-DATA-1, IIP-PRACTICE-2

"I grew up in a culture and society where women are exposed to sexism and harassment from a young age. When I was 10 years old, I was groped by a man at a Tokyo swimming complex. My friend’s mother said it was my fault for wearing a 'cute bikini.' Sexual molestation on public transport is a common problem that society trivializes. In high school, my friends and I faced this on a daily basis" (para 23).
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"In the past year in Japan, we’ve made some progress. In July, our lower house of parliament (where just 10.1 percent of seats are held by women) amended the law pertaining to sexual assault to increase minimum sentences from three to five years, recognize male victims and widen the definition of what constitutes rape. But we need to keep pushing for more change. The age of consent is still 13" (para 34).
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"In late May, at a press conference in the Tokyo District Court, I went public about being raped. In Japan, it's unthinkable for a woman to do this" (para 1-2). "As I went through the ensuing criminal case proceedings, I came to realize how Japan’s system works to undermine survivors of sexual assault. The investigation was scuttled throughout. This was, I and others suspect, partly due to political pressure, but also because of a medical, investigative, legal and, ultimately, social system that marginalizes and fails victims of sex crimes. I’ve had to fight every step of the way" (para 4-5). "From the medical professionals to the police, I encountered a ...more
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"In early June 2015, officers at Takanawa police station obtained a warrant for Mr. Yamaguchi’s arrest for incapacitated — or what is called 'quasi' — rape. Police planned to arrest him at Narita airport on June 8, but in a highly unusual move, the then chief of criminal investigation at the Tokyo Metropolitan Police canceled the arrest. My case was transferred to that department, where I was asked to settle out of court. Prosecutors filed papers against Mr. Yamaguchi, but in July 2016, they dropped all charges, citing insufficient evidence" (para 13-14). "My coming forward [about my rape] made national news and shocked the public. The backlash hit me hard. ...more
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"[In] our lower house of parliament...just 10.1 percent of seats are held by women" (para 34).
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"In late May, at a press conference in the Tokyo District Court, I went public about being raped. In Japan, it’s unthinkable for a woman to do this" (para 1-2). "It is taboo to even use the word 'rape,' which is often replaced by 'violated' or 'tricked' if the victim was underage. This contributes to public ignorance" (para 17). "There is a strong social stigma associated with speaking out against sexual assault" (para 24). "In mid-October, around the time the Harvey Weinstein story broke, my book 'Black Box' was published. Editor Izumi Ando had encouraged me to write about my experiences, saying that by going public, I’d cracked the door ...more
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Many of the women who have shared their stories with me were assaulted in their workplace by their bosses" (para 29).
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"In the past year in Japan, we’ve made some progress. In July, our lower house of parliament (where just 10.1 percent of seats are held by women) amended the law pertaining to sexual assault to increase minimum sentences from three to five years, recognize male victims and widen the definition of what constitutes rape" (para 34).
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"In the past year in Japan, we’ve made some progress. In July, our lower house of parliament (where just 10.1 percent of seats are held by women) amended the law pertaining to sexual assault to increase minimum sentences from three to five years, recognize male victims and widen the definition of what constitutes rape. But we need to keep pushing for more change...To establish a case, victims need to prove 'violence and intimidation,' something that is virtually impossible" (para 34).
Jan. 10, 2018, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"My coming forward [about my rape] made national news and shocked the public. The backlash hit me hard. I was vilified on social media and received hate messages and emails and calls from unknown numbers. I was called a 'slut' and 'prostitute' and told I should 'be dead.' There were arguments over my nationality, because a true Japanese woman wouldn’t speak about such 'shameful' things. Fake stories popped up online about my private life with photos of my family. I received messages from women criticizing me for failing to protect myself. The mainstream media discussed what I wore. On social media, people said leaving the top buttons of my shirt ...more
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:33 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-4

"Mizuho Fukushima, 60, a member of the upper house of Parliament from the Social Democratic Party who has repeatedly proposed a revision of the single-surname law, said she had remained in a common-law marriage for nearly four decades with Yuichi Kaido, a lawyer with whom she has a daughter" (para 31).
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:32 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"In the Tokyo District Court case, the three judges, all men, ruled that the teacher’s employer, a private school in Tokyo, could not be compelled to let her use her birth surname at work. Citing surveys that show about a quarter of women use their original surnames in the workplace, the court said doing so was 'not deeply rooted in society.' The plaintiff, who has remained anonymous in the publicly available court documents, declined an interview request through her lawyer. In court filings, the teacher, described as recently married, said students and colleagues knew her by her given surname. She asked to be allowed to continue to use it on ...more
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:32 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

In the Tokyo District Court case, the three judges, all men, ruled that the teacher’s employer, a private school in Tokyo, could not be compelled to let her use her birth surname at work. Citing surveys that show about a quarter of women use their original surnames in the workplace, the court said doing so was 'not deeply rooted in society.' The plaintiff, who has remained anonymous in the publicly available court documents, declined an interview request through her lawyer. In court filings, the teacher, described as recently married, said students and colleagues knew her by her given surname. She asked to be allowed to continue to use it on ...more
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Japan’s Constitution promises gender equality, and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he wants a society where all women can 'shine.' But many women say that is hard to do when they cannot even use their own surnames" (para 2). "Advocates for women, including lawmakers across the political spectrum, say they simply want women to make their own choices about their names. But recent court rulings indicate that the law is unlikely to be softened anytime soon, despite rising criticism" (para 4). "An increasing number of employers now permit women to use their birth surnames professionally. Yet the courts have undermined even that practice. This month, a Tokyo District Court declined ...more
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3, ERBG-DATA-2, LBHO-DATA-1, GP-DATA-1

"Despite recent high-profile examples, women hold very few powerful positions in politics or business" (para 10).
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Advocates for women, including lawmakers across the political spectrum, say they simply want women to make their own choices about their names. But recent court rulings indicate that the law is unlikely to be softened anytime soon, despite rising criticism" (para 4). "An increasing number of employers now permit women to use their birth surnames professionally. Yet the courts have undermined even that practice. This month, a Tokyo District Court declined to grant a high school teacher’s request to use her original name at work. That decision came after Japan’s Supreme Court ruled in December that the law did not violate the Constitution or place an undue burden on women. ...more
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"Japan’s Constitution promises gender equality, and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he wants a society where all women can 'shine'" (para 2).
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Among democratic countries in the developed world, Japan ranks low on gender equality in health, education, the economy and politics" (para 10).
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"An increasing number of employers now permit women to use their birth surnames professionally. Yet the courts have undermined even that practice. This month, a Tokyo District Court declined to grant a high school teacher’s request to use her original name at work" (para 8). " . . . many working mothers say that day care is inadequate" (para 10) (Coder comment: women are expected to assume care of children, so lack of adequate day care will inhibit many women from working full-time or at all -ARR). "'The desire of the plaintiff to use her commonly known name, which is different from her legal name, is not legally protected,' the ...more
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-4, MARR-LAW-4

"In the absence of legal reform, some couples choose not to legally register their marriages, even though women in such relationships have fewer legal protections" (para 30).
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"An increasing number of employers now permit women to use their birth surnames professionally. Yet the courts have undermined even that practice. This month, a Tokyo District Court declined to grant a high school teacher’s request to use her original name at work. That decision came after Japan’s Supreme Court ruled in December that the law did not violate the Constitution or place an undue burden on women. Critics were disappointed that the decision did not strike down the legal prohibition against separate surnames for married couples, leaving it to the Parliament instead" (para 8-9). "In the Tokyo District Court case, the three judges, all men, ruled that the teacher’s ...more
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Under a Japanese law that dates back to the Meiji era, more than a century ago, all married couples must use one surname. In theory, a couple may choose either the husband’s or the wife’s last name, but in practice, 96 percent of women assume their husband’s" (para 3). "Japan’s Supreme Court ruled in December that the law did not violate the Constitution or place an undue burden on women. Critics were disappointed that the decision did not strike down the legal prohibition against separate surnames for married couples, leaving it to the Parliament instead" (para 9).
Dec. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2

" The marital naming law, supported by many conservatives who believe that women belong predominantly in the home supporting their husbands and families, is seen by some as another vestige of discrimination against women in Japanese society" (para 11).
Nov. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1, BR-DATA-1

"Meanwhile, the combination of a dismal fertility rate (1.4 births per woman) and the world’s highest life expectancy, 83.7 years, means Japan is sitting on a demographic time bomb" (para 7).
Nov. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Only 38 percent of women remain in their jobs after having a baby, according to the OECD, due to heavy social expectations placed on mothers and a dearth of child-care centers. It’s a problem intertwined with a reluctance to let outsiders into the country. Labor costs are high in Japan, making child care and nannies far beyond the economic reach of many families" (para 8). "Abe’s “womenomics” campaign to increase female economic participation may be faltering, even relatively modest measures such as creating more nurseries have borne fruit: A program to add roughly 700,000 child-care facilities contributed to a 4 percent rise in female employment since late 2012, according to ...more
Nov. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-1

"Japan’s gender wage gap — about 27 percent at median earnings — discourages women from building careers after marriage" (para 5).
Nov. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"Japanese women hold 10 percent of seats in the nation’s parliament" (para 5).
Nov. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"It’s a problem intertwined with a reluctance to let outsiders into the country. Labor costs are high in Japan, making child care and nannies far beyond the economic reach of many families. Japan has only recently begun relaxing rules on allowing in domestic workers from countries like the Philippines, who could help provide lower-cost child care as they do in Singapore and Hong Kong" (para 8).
Nov. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: GP-DATA-2

"Her triumph caps a remarkable two months in which Japan has seen the election of Tokyo’s first female governor and the appointment of a female defense minister, only the second woman to hold that position" (para 2).