The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Japan

April 27, 2021, 11:10 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Marukawa...was among 50 upper and lower house members of the ruling Liberal Democratic party (LDP) who wrote to their colleagues on the Saitama prefectural assembly urging them to oppose the adoption of a written opinion favouring a policy change. Written opinions adopted at the local level are often seen as a way of promoting debate in parliament" (para 5-6). "The supreme court ruling in 2015 came four years after a group of women launched a legal challenge seeking damages for the emotional distress and inconvenience of having to take their husband’s name" (para 7). "Conservative politicians and commentators have argued that allowing couples to have different surnames would harm the...more
April 27, 2021, 11:10 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: GP-DATA-3

"Japan’s minister for women’s empowerment and gender equality, Tamayo Marukawa, is among a group of conservative MPs who have opposed a legal change that would allow women to keep their birth name after marriage...Marukawa...recently took on the women’s empowerment portfolio after her predecessor, Seiko Hashimoto, was appointed head of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics organising committee" (para 1, 4).
April 27, 2021, 11:10 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ADDL-DATA-2

"Japan is one of only a few industrialised countries where it is illegal for married couples to have different surnames. The country’s civil code, introduced in 1896, requires married couples to share a surname and while it does not stipulate which name they should adopt, in practice women take their husband’s name in 96% of cases...In 2015 women’s rights activists were dealt a blow when the supreme court ruled that the requirement to share surnames did not violate the constitution" (para 2-3).
April 19, 2021, 4:21 p.m.
Countries: Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Brazil, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, Germany, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Jamaica, Japan, Kosovo, Latvia, Lithuania, Maldives, Mauritius, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Suriname, Taiwan, Thailand, Tunisia, Ukraine, United States, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-2

2.0
April 19, 2021, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kosovo, Latvia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom
Variables: AOM-SCALE-3

0.0
April 19, 2021, 3:54 p.m.
Countries: Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, D R Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liberia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, North Korea, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Rwanda, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: AOM-SCALE-2

0.0more
April 16, 2021, 6:32 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CUST-LAW-4

Japan does not have restrictions on adoption of children of a certain sex based on the sex and marital status of the adoptive parent.
April 7, 2021, 10:31 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"In 2020, 100% of births in Japan were attended by skilled health personnele" (p 45).
April 7, 2021, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DACH-DATA-1

"In 2016, the life expectancy at birth in Japan was 81.1 years for males and 87.1 years for females" (p 44).
April 2, 2021, 9:47 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: IM-DATA-1

"In 2018, the under-five mortality rate in Japan was 2 per 1000 live births" (p 45).
March 31, 2021, 3:37 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MMR-SCALE-1

"In 2017, the maternal mortality ratio for women in Japan was 5 per 100,000 live births" (p 45).
March 31, 2021, 3:22 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MMR-DATA-1

"In 2017, the maternal mortality ratio for women in Japan was 5 per 100,000 live births" (p 45).
March 19, 2021, 3:56 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"The adolescent birth rate from 2010-2018 in Japan is 3.4 per 1000 women aged 15-19 years" (p 50).
March 8, 2021, 9:44 a.m.
Countries: Argentina, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Macedonia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Moldova, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, United Kingdom
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

2.0
Jan. 18, 2021, 3:46 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain, Barbados, Belize, Burundi, Croatia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Finland, Guyana, Iceland, India, Israel, Japan, Kosovo, Maldives, Montenegro, Nepal, Portugal, South Korea, Taiwan, Turkey, Zambia
Variables: ABO-SCALE-1

2.0
Jan. 15, 2021, 6:33 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

“The ascension ceremony in a state room at the imperial palace will make history in another way: For the first time in the modern era, a woman will be present. Satsuki Katayama, the sole woman in the cabinet of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, will be on hand to witness this first step in Naruhito’s enthronement” (Para. 3). “When Japan’s Parliament passed a one-time law in 2017 allowing Akihito to abdicate, it attached an addendum that encouraged the government to study possible reforms that would allow women in the royal family to remain within the imperial household after marrying and grant them the right to head legitimate lines of succession. Bowing...more
Jan. 15, 2021, 6:33 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-2

“Public opinion also strongly favors allowing women to rule. In a poll conducted by The Asahi Shimbun, Japan’s second largest daily newspaper, more than three-quarters of those surveyed said they would support a female emperor” (Para. 17).
Jan. 15, 2021, 6:33 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-3

“Women are not allowed to reign. In fact, women born into the royal family must officially leave it once they marry, and none of their children can be in line to the throne” (Para. 6). “‘If a female or the child of a female royal succeeds to the throne, it would be a major change,” said Hidetsugu Yagi, a professor of law and philosophy at Reitaku University in Kashiwa, Japan. “The imperial family would lose its legitimacy.’ But historians point out that imperial traditions have changed over time. ‘The idea that succession is limited to males is a modern invention,’ said Kathryn Tanaka, an associate professor of cultural and historical...more
Jan. 14, 2021, 7:14 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: EWCMS-DATA-4

In Japan in 2014, women comprised 7.7% of the police force.
Jan. 2, 2021, 12:16 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: EWCMS-LAW-2

Japan does not have conscription.
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"And Ms. Hojo, like many women in Japan, cannot accept a full-time job even after Mr. Abe pushed through a law intended to ease Japan’s brutal work culture. Because she shoulders the bulk of housework and child care, the hours at work would be too demanding. 'If there are talented, competent women who get married or have children, their career paths are derailed,' Ms. Hojo said" (para 4-5). "Ms. Hojo, the accountant, said she viewed her destiny as extending beyond motherhood. 'I still have ambition,' she said. When she returned to work after staying home with her newborn daughter for two years, she took a part-time job at the medical...more
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"Still, like so many other men in Japanese politics, Mr. Suga has made public comments that reflect traditional views about a woman’s role in society" (para 25). "Mr. Kishida was roundly attacked on Twitter recently after posting a picture of his wife serving him dinner while she stood in the doorway looking more like a waitress than a partner" (para 27).
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MULV-LAW-1

"Megumi Mikawa, 40, said she did not see how her life had improved under the Abe administration. In July, she quit her clerical job in Nishinomiya, a city in western Japan, because she was unable to perform her duties from home during the pandemic. Because she left the part-time job voluntarily, she was not eligible for unemployment benefits or government subsidies for parents who took time off to care for children while schools were closed because of the coronavirus" (para 28-29).
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"To many women, Mr. Abe showed his true colors on two cultural issues: his repeated demurral on a growing push to change a 19th-century law dictating that married couples use one surname, and his emphasis on the “importance of the male succession” as a majority of the Japanese public supports allowing a woman to become emperor" (para 14). "Yayoi Kimura, a Liberal Democratic member of the House of Representatives ...said that when she co-sponsored a bill to provide a tax break for unmarried parents, some of her male colleagues argued that most single mothers were either mistresses of rich men or hyperambitious career women who did not need government assistance"...more
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"Just three members of his [Shinzo's] cabinet of 20 are women" (para 18).
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"Women represent less than 15 percent of lawmakers in Japan’s Parliament. Of the 102 current parliamentary members who are women, fewer than half are in Mr. Abe’s conservative Liberal Democratic Party" (para 18).
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: SMES-DATA-1, RISW-PRACTICE-2

"Among single mothers, the poverty rate has worsened under Mr. Abe. More than half fell below the poverty line in 2019, up from nearly 45 percent when Mr. Abe became prime minister in 2012, according to the Japan Institute for Labor Policy and Training, a think tank" (para 13).
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"Mr. Abe did shift the tone from previous leaders who had declared that a woman’s rightful place was in the home" (para 11). "Still, like so many other men in Japanese politics, Mr. Suga has made public comments that reflect traditional views about a woman’s role in society. When a popular actor, Masaharu Fukuyama, married the actress Kazue Fukiishi in 2015, Mr. Suga predicted on television that their marriage would prompt 'Mama-sans' around the country to 'want to have babies alongside the new couple and contribute to the country' (para 25-26). "And when Mr. Suga and the other two men running for prime minister, Fumio Kishida and Shigeru Ishiba, were...more
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-2

"All three of the lawmakers vying to replace Mr. Abe as prime minister are men. Two women initially indicated they would be interested in running, but quickly dropped out after failing to gain support" (para 17).
Jan. 1, 2021, 3:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"And Ms. Hojo, like many women in Japan, cannot accept a full-time job even after Mr. Abe pushed through a law intended to ease Japan’s brutal work culture. Because she shoulders the bulk of housework and child care, the hours at work would be too demanding" (para 4). "But many women still struggle to find adequate child care, even after Mr. Abe promised to eliminate waiting lists for public day-care centers by 2020. As of earlier this year, there were still nearly 12,500 children on waiting lists, even as the number of babies born in Japan fell to the lowest level in close to a century and a half" (para...more