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Latest items for Liberia

Feb. 8, 2019, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"Liberia increased the length of paid maternity leave from 90 to 98 days. Further, the new labor code mandates equal remuneration for work of equal value, as well as prohibits discrimination based on gender in various aspects of employment, including hiring, promotions and dismissal. Liberia’s new labor code also guarantees employees returning from maternity leave an equivalent position" (p. 39).
Feb. 8, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: GIC-LAW-3

"Liberia increased the length of paid maternity leave from 90 to 98 days" (39).
Feb. 8, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: GIC-LAW-1

"Liberia increased the length of paid maternity leave from 90 to 98 days" (39).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"The 2011 National Children’s Act sets the marriage age for all persons at 18 years, while the Domestic Relations Act sets the minimum marriage age at 21 for men and 18 for women. The Equal Rights of the Traditional Marriage Act of 1998 permits a girl to marry at age 16" (Pg 18-19).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1, GP-DATA-1, GP-DATA-6

"In addition to a woman president, there were three women in the 20-member national cabinet. There were three women in the 30-seat Senate and eight in the 73-seat House of Representatives. Two female associate justices sat on the five-member Supreme Court. Women constituted 33 percent of local government officials and 13 percent of senior and deputy ministers" (Pg 12).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: DTCP-LAW-1

"The social stigma of rape, especially in rural areas, contributed to the pervasiveness of out-of-court settlements and discouraged formal prosecution of cases. An overtaxed justice system also prevented timely prosecution, although local NGOs pushed for judicial action and sometimes provided lawyers to indigent victims. The government raised awareness of rape through billboards, radio broadcasts, and other outreach campaigns" (Pg 15).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-2, DV-LAW-1, DV-LAW-2

"Although outlawed, domestic violence remained a widespread problem. The maximum penalty for domestic violence is six months’ imprisonment, but the government did not enforce the law effectively and generally treated cases, if reported, as either simple or aggravated assault. During the year the Ministry of Gender, Children, and Social Protection (MOGCSP) organized workshops and seminars to combat domestic violence. Media made some efforts to publicize the problem, and several NGOs continued programs to treat abused women and girls and to increase public awareness of their rights. LNP officers received training on sexual offenses as part of their initial training" (Pg 15-16).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Women and men enjoy the same legal status. By law women can inherit land and property, are entitled to receive equal pay for equal work, have the right of equal access to education, and can own and manage businesses. Women experienced discrimination, however, in such areas as employment (see section 7.d.), credit, pay, education, and housing. In rural areas traditional practice or traditional leaders often did not recognize a woman’s right to inherit land. Programs to educate traditional leaders about women’s rights made some progress, but authorities often did not enforce those rights" (Pg 17). "Discrimination in employment and occupation occurred with respect to gender, disability, and HIV-positive status (see...more
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

"The law does not specifically prohibit sexual harassment, which remained a major problem, including in schools and places of work. Government billboards and notices in government offices warned against harassment in the workplace" (Pg 16).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"No laws restrict couples and individuals from deciding the number, spacing, and timing of their children or managing their reproductive health, and individuals have the right to seek and acquire information on reproductive health. Information and assistance on family planning was difficult to obtain, however, particularly in rural areas, where there were few health clinics. The government included family planning counseling and services as key components of its new 10-year national health and social welfare plan. A 2013 demographic and health report indicated modern contraceptive use stood at 20 percent nationwide, although some rural counties had rates closer to 10 percent. A 2011 government-led survey found that approximately two-thirds of...more
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: GP-DATA-3

"No specific office exists to enforce the legal rights of women, but the MOGCSP and the Women, Peace, and Security Secretariat (established within the MOGCSP to implement UN Security Council Resolution 1325) generally are responsible for promoting women’s rights" (Pg 17).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2, NGOFW-DATA-1

"The Sexual and Gender-based Crimes Unit continued to coordinate with Court E and to collaborate with NGOs and international donors to increase public awareness of sexual and gender-based violence issues; these efforts, according to the government and NGOs, led to increased reporting of rape. Despite increased reporting, however, human rights groups claimed the true prevalence of rape was still higher than reported, since many cases go unreported. The government runs a shelter for sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) victims and victims of trafficking in persons, and established two hotlines for citizens to report SGBV-related crimes. The Sexual Pathways Referral program, a combined initiative of the government and NGOs, improved access...more
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1, AOM-DATA-2

"In partnership with international donors, the government operated a free alternative basic education program which, for those unable to access formal education, taught life skills such as health, hygiene, birth control, and the merits of delayed marriage. During the year, the government distributed to those enrolled in formal education a parentteacher association manual promoting delayed marriage. Mass media campaigns were conducted in target communities, especially in rural areas, to educate citizens about the negative consequences of child marriage. Nevertheless, underage marriage remained a problem, especially in rural areas. According to a 2015 UNICEF report, 11 percent of women ages 20 to 24 were married by age 15 and 38 percent...more
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1, INFIB-LAW-1, INFIB-DATA-2, SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The law does not specifically prohibit FGM/C, although the government maintained that a 2011 law protecting children against all forms of violence also proscribes FGM/C. FGM/C is often performed during initiation into women’s secret Sande societies. Given the sensitivity of the topic, FGM/C surveys typically eliminate direct reference to FGM/C and instead ask respondents about initiation into a women’s secret society, making it difficult to ascertain actual prevalence rates. According to a 2013 demographic health survey, 49.8 percent of girls and women ages 15-49 had undergone the procedure. FGM/C was common and traditionally performed on young girls of northern, western, and central ethnic groups, particularly in rural areas and in...more
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"Families living in the interior sometimes sent young women and children to stay with relatives in Monrovia or other cities with the promise that the relatives would assist the women and children to pursue educational or other opportunities. In some instances these women and children were forced to work as street vendors, domestic servants, or beggars. Young women and children also were subject to forced labor on rubber plantations and in gold mines, rock-crushing quarries, and alluvial diamond mines. Forced labor continued despite efforts by NGOs and other organizations to eliminate the practice" (Pg 24).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, LO-LAW-1, CONST-LAW-1

"Women and men enjoy the same legal status. By law women can inherit land and property, are entitled to receive equal pay for equal work, have the right of equal access to education, and can own and manage businesses. Women experienced discrimination, however, in such areas as employment (see section 7.d.), credit, pay, education, and housing. In rural areas traditional practice or traditional leaders often did not recognize a woman’s right to inherit land. Programs to educate traditional leaders about women’s rights made some progress, but authorities often did not enforce those rights" (Pg 17).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

" Rape is illegal, but the government did not enforce the law effectively, and rape remained a serious and pervasive problem" (Pg 14).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1, MMR-PRACTICE-1, MMR-DATA-1

"According to the UN Population Fund’s 2015 Trends in Maternal Mortality Report, the country had a maternal mortality rate estimated at 725 per 100,000 live births, and a woman’s lifetime risk of maternal death was one in 28. Reducing maternal mortality remained a priority of the government, and activities in past years included additional training of midwives and providing incentives to pregnant women to seek prenatal care and childbirth at a hospital or clinic. Most women delivered outside of health facilities" (Pg 17).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

"The social stigma of rape, especially in rural areas, contributed to the pervasiveness of out-of-court settlements and discouraged formal prosecution of cases. An overtaxed justice system also prevented timely prosecution, although local NGOs pushed for judicial action and sometimes provided lawyers to indigent victims. The government raised awareness of rape through billboards, radio broadcasts, and other outreach campaigns" (Pg 15). "Women and men enjoy the same legal status. By law women can inherit land and property, are entitled to receive equal pay for equal work, have the right of equal access to education, and can own and manage businesses. Women experienced discrimination, however, in such areas as employment (see section...more
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"Women and men enjoy the same legal status. By law women can inherit land and property, are entitled to receive equal pay for equal work, have the right of equal access to education, and can own and manage businesses. Women experienced discrimination, however, in such areas as employment (see section 7.d.), credit, pay, education, and housing. In rural areas traditional practice or traditional leaders often did not recognize a woman’s right to inherit land. Programs to educate traditional leaders about women’s rights made some progress, but authorities often did not enforce those rights. The law does not prohibit discrimination in hiring based on gender, and women experienced economic discrimination based...more
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-2, PW-LAW-1

"While the law prohibits polygamy, traditional and religious customs permit men to have more than one wife" (Pg 17).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"The law’s definition of rape does not specifically criminalize spousal rape. First-degree rape--defined as rape involving a minor, rape that results in serious injury or disability, or rape committed with the use of a deadly weapon--is punishable by up to life imprisonment. Second-degree rape, defined as rape committed without the aggravating circumstances enumerated above, is punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Defendants accused of first-degree rape may be denied bail if evidence presented at arraignment meets certain evidentiary standards" (Pg 14).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"According to the latest World Health Organization figures, 77 percent of women and girls stated they had been victims of sexual violence" (Pg 14).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

" Rape is illegal, but the government did not enforce the law effectively, and rape remained a serious and pervasive problem...The law’s definition of rape does not specifically criminalize spousal rape. First-degree rape--defined as rape involving a minor, rape that results in serious injury or disability, or rape committed with the use of a deadly weapon--is punishable by up to life imprisonment. Second-degree rape, defined as rape committed without the aggravating circumstances enumerated above, is punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Defendants accused of first-degree rape may be denied bail if evidence presented at arraignment meets certain evidentiary standards" (Pg 14).
Feb. 6, 2019, 2:48 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Conditions for women prisoners were somewhat better than those for men, and women inmates were less likely to suffer from overcrowding. Women also had more freedom to move within the women’s section of facilities" (Pg 3).
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:41 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"12.3% of seats in the lower/single house of Liberia (9 out of 73 total seats) are held by women. 10.0% of seats in the upper house/Senate of Liberia (3 out of 30 total seats) are held by women"
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"15.8% of ministerial positions in Liberai (3 out of 19 total positions) are held by women"
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Angola, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Suriname, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Uganda, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-4

2.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, D R Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mongolia, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Suriname, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Uganda, Ukraine, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-2

2.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: MURDER-DATA-4

According to calculations based on the WHO Homicide Estimates for 2015, the homicide rate for females aged 15-44 is 6.83 per 100,000 female population ages 15-44.