The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Mali

Feb. 8, 2019, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"The case against a soldier who allegedly raped a 13-year-old girl in August 2014 remained open. The military released the suspect in September 2014, and at year’s end had not responded to requests by the civilian prosecutor to produce the suspect for trial. Despite the military’s lack of cooperation, the prosecutor continued to pursue the case" (page 4).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: IRP-LAW-5

"The law prohibits the sexual exploitation of children, including prostitution. . . . The country has a statutory rape law that defines 18 as the minimum age for consensual sex. The law, which was inconsistent with the legal minimum marriage age of 15 for girls, was not enforced" (page 23-24).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: MMR-PRACTICE-1

"Major factors contributing to maternal mortality included lack of access to skilled medical practitioners, lack of family support for pregnant women seeking to visit health centers, and unsafe abortions. Many women and girls gave birth at home with only family members present. The 2013 DHS indicated skilled health personnel attended 55 percent of births" (page 21).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"The constitution provides for tuition-free universal education, and the law provides for compulsory schooling from ages seven to 16" (page 22).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The constitution and law prohibit discrimination based on race, sex, religion, political opinion, social origin, language, or color. Citizens were generally reluctant to file complaints or press charges of discrimination due to cultural factors. Absent complaints or lawsuits, the government did not aggressively pursue violations of these laws" (page 20).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, LO-LAW-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1

"While the law provides for equal property rights, traditional practices and ignorance of the law prevented women from taking full advantage of their rights" (page 22).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3, AFE-DATA-1

"Girls’ enrollment was lower than that of boys at all levels due to poverty, cultural preference to educate boys, early marriage of girls, and sexual harassment of girls" (page 22).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: CUST-LAW-1

"Women are legally obligated to obey their husbands and are particularly vulnerable in cases of divorce, child custody, and inheritance. Women had very limited access to legal services due to their lack of education and information as well as the prohibitive cost" (page 21).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: INFIB-DATA-2

"FGM/C is legal in the country and, except in certain northern areas, all religious and ethnic groups practiced it widely, particularly in rural areas. Parents generally performed FGM/C on girls between the ages of six months and nine years. The most recent comprehensive FGM/C survey, conducted by UNICEF in 2010, indicated 89 percent of girls and women ages 15 to 49 were excised, and 74 percent of girls and women in the same age group had at least one daughter who was excised. Government information campaigns regarding the dangers of FGM/C reached citizens throughout the country, and human rights organizations reported decreased incidence of FGM/C among children of educated parents"...more
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"As of August 20, the Bamako Central Prison held 1,903 prisoners in a facility designed to hold 400. Detention conditions were better in women’s prisons than in those for men. Authorities held pretrial detainees with convicted prisoners. Authorities detained the 58 persons arrested on charges related to terrorism in the high-security division of Bamako Central Prison. Authorities may hold arrested individuals for up to 72 hours in police stations, where there were no separate holding areas for men, women, or children" (page 4).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: ISSA-DATA-1

"Authorities prosecuted at least two infanticide cases during the year" (page 24).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: GP-DATA-3

"The Ministry for the Promotion of Women, the Family, and Children is responsible for ensuring the legal rights of women" (page 22).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: ISTD-PRACTICE-1

"Societal discrimination against persons with HIV/AIDS occurred. The government did not implement campaigns to increase awareness of the condition or reduce discrimination against persons with HIV/AIDS" (page 26).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"Other human rights problems included . . . rape of and domestic violence against women and girls; female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); human trafficking; societal discrimination against black Tuaregs, who were subjected to slavery-related practices; discrimination based on sexual orientation; and discrimination against persons with HIV/AIDS and albinism. Authorities often disregarded workers’ rights, and exploitative labor, including child labor, was common" (page 1). "Primarily before the peace accord went into effect on June 20, elements within the Platform--including the Imghad Tuareg and Allies Self Defense Group (GATIA)-- and separatist armed groups--including the National Movement for the Liberation of the Azawad (MNLA), the High Council for the Unity of Azawad (HCUA), and...more
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: BR-PRACTICE-1, BR-PRACTICE-2

"Women’s ability to make decisions regarding reproduction was limited, and many lacked information on sexual and reproductive health. Women faced pressure to defer to their husbands and family on reproductive matters, including the number, spacing, and timing of pregnancies" (page 21).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1

"Other human rights problems included . . . rape of and domestic violence against women and girls; female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); human trafficking; societal discrimination against black Tuaregs, who were subjected to slavery-related practices; discrimination based on sexual orientation; and discrimination against persons with HIV/AIDS and albinism. Authorities often disregarded workers’ rights, and exploitative labor, including child labor, was common" (page 1). "FGM/C is legal in the country and, except in certain northern areas, all religious and ethnic groups practiced it widely, particularly in rural areas. Although FGM/C is legal, authorities prohibited the practice in government-funded health centers. Parents generally performed FGM/C on girls between the ages of six months...more
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: IIP-LAW-2

"The law does not prohibit sexual harassment, which routinely occurred, including in schools, without any governmental efforts to prevent it" (page 21).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"In October 2014 authorities closed more than 100 brothels that conducted illegal practices such as holding underage girls" (page 24).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"The law criminalizes rape and provides a penalty of five to 20 years’ imprisonment for offenders, but the government did not enforce the law effectively. . . . No law specifically prohibits spousal rape, but law enforcement officials stated criminal laws against rape apply to spousal rape" (page 20). "The country has a statutory rape law that defines 18 as the minimum age for consensual sex. The law, which was inconsistent with the legal minimum marriage age of 15 for girls, was not enforced" (page 23-24).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"Many NGOs operating shelters for abused female domestic laborers faced difficulties due to the absence of support from their usual foreign partners" (page 20). "NGOs implemented awareness campaigns aimed at abating child marriage" (page 23).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Domestic violence against women, including spousal abuse, was prevalent. Most cases went unreported. Spousal abuse is a crime, but the law does not specifically prohibit domestic violence. Assault is punishable by prison terms of one to five years and fines of up to 500,000 CFA francs ($866) or, if premeditated, up to 10 years’ imprisonment. Police were reluctant to intervene in cases of domestic violence" (page 20). "Police and the social services department in the Ministry of Solidarity, Humanitarian Action, and the Reconstruction of the North investigated and intervened in some reported cases of child abuse or neglect, but the government provided few services for such children" (page 23).more
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"Women’s ability to make decisions regarding reproduction was limited, and many lacked information on sexual and reproductive health. Women faced pressure to defer to their husbands and family on reproductive matters, including the number, spacing, and timing of pregnancies. Women often did not have access to contraception and skilled attendance during childbirth, including essential obstetric and postpartum care. . . . Major factors contributing to maternal mortality included lack of access to skilled medical practitioners, lack of family support for pregnant women seeking to visit health centers, and unsafe abortions" (page 21).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"Other human rights problems included . . . rape of and domestic violence against women and girls; female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); human trafficking; societal discrimination against black Tuaregs, who were subjected to slavery-related practices; discrimination based on sexual orientation; and discrimination against persons with HIV/AIDS and albinism. Authorities often disregarded workers’ rights, and exploitative labor, including child labor, was common" (page 1). "Primarily before the peace accord went into effect on June 20, elements within the Platform--including the Imghad Tuareg and Allies Self Defense Group (GATIA)-- and separatist armed groups--including the National Movement for the Liberation of the Azawad (MNLA), the High Council for the Unity of Azawad (HCUA), and...more
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: INFIB-LAW-1

"FGM/C is legal in the country and, except in certain northern areas, all religious and ethnic groups practiced it widely, particularly in rural areas. Although FGM/C is legal, authorities prohibited the practice in government-funded health centers . . . Government information campaigns regarding the dangers of FGM/C reached citizens throughout the country, and human rights organizations reported decreased incidence of FGM/C among children of educated parents" (page 20-21).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: ERBG-DATA-1

"The government was the major formal-sector employer and ostensibly paid women the same as men for similar work, but differences in job descriptions permitted pay inequality" (page 30).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: PRN-LAW-1

"Penalties for indecent assault, including child pornography, range from five to 20 years in prison" (page 23).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: GEW-LAW-1

"MINUSMA’s mandate also included providing specific protection for women and children affected by armed conflict and addressing the needs of victims of sexual and gender-based violence in armed conflict" (page 6).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-1

"In 2013 the government and the United Nations signed a protocol agreement to protect children associated with armed conflict. The protocol established a procedure to transfer such children to an interim care center operated by the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) . . . With the support of MINUSMA, in 2013 MAA and MNLA leaders signed an agreement prohibiting the recruitment of children and allowing MINUSMA to screen their troops in September 2014" (page 12). "The law prohibits the sexual exploitation of children, including prostitution. Penalties for the sexual exploitation of both adults and children are six months to three years in prison and a fine of between 20,000 and one...more
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: IAW-LAW-1

"The law does not provide the same legal status and rights for women as for men, particularly concerning divorce and inheritance. Women are legally obligated to obey their husbands and are particularly vulnerable in cases of divorce, child custody, and inheritance. Women had very limited access to legal services due to their lack of education and information as well as the prohibitive cost . . . While the law provides for equal property rights, traditional practices and ignorance of the law prevented women from taking full advantage of their rights. The marriage contract must specify a community-property marriage" (page 21-22).
Feb. 8, 2019, 4:42 p.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"ape was a widespread problem. Authorities prosecuted only a small percentage of rape cases since victims seldom reported rapes due to societal pressure, particularly because attackers were frequently close relatives. . . . Information on convictions was not available" (page 20).