The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Mauritania

April 4, 2019, 7:27 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Colombia, Cote D'Ivoire, Cuba, D R Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Suriname, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Uganda, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-3

4.0
March 21, 2019, 1:45 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, El Salvador, Estonia, France, Guinea, Honduras, Indonesia, Ireland, Kenya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mauritania, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Namibia, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Slovenia, South Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Switzerland, Tanzania, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: GP-SCALE-1

1.0
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"Data on the number of victims removed from forced labor was not available" (page 26).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"In accordance with agreements with the Economic Community of West African States on freedom of movement, the government allows West Africans to remain in the country for up to three months, after which they must apply for residency or work permits. Migrants determined to be illegally seeking to reach Spain’s nearby Canary Islands were deported. According to the Ministry of Interior and Decentralization, immigration officials returned 4,600 migrants to their countries of origin between January 1 and September 4" (page 13).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, PHBP-PRACTICE-1

"Traditional forms of mistreatment of women continued to decline. One of these is the forced feeding of adolescent girls prior to marriage, practiced by some Beydane families. Increased government, media, and civil society attention to the problem, including the health risks associated with excessive body weight, continued to lessen traditional encouragement of female obesity" (page 18).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Male guards sometimes patrolled women’s prisons, and authorities incarcerated children with adult prisoners" (page 1). "Male guards frequently monitored female inmates in the women’s prison of Nouakchott, a practice criticized by the National Commission on Human Rights (CNDH). Conditions of detention for women were generally better than those for men. According to prison officials, the women’s prison in Nouakchott was less crowded . . . The Ministry of Justice sometimes gave temporary custody of the children of prisoners to another family member to remove them from confinement" (page 3-4). "The law provides for due process, and defendants enjoy a presumption of innocence. While authorities informed defendants of the charges/accusations against...more
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: INFIB-DATA-2

"FGM/C was practiced by all ethnic groups to varying degrees and performed on young girls, often on the seventh day after birth and almost always before the age of six months. Excision was the most severe form of FGM/C practiced. The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF’s) 2013 report estimated the prevalence among women at 69.4 percent, its prevalence among girls ages five to 18 at 54.8 percent, and its prevalence among girls under five at 46.6 percent" (page 17).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: DV-LAW-1, DV-LAW-2

"Spousal abuse and domestic violence are illegal, but there are no specific penalties for domestic violence" (page 17).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: DTCP-LAW-1

"Sharia is, in part, the basis for law and court procedures. Courts did not treat women equally with men in all cases" (page 8). "Human rights activists and lawyers reported that rape victims were stigmatized, persecuted, and even imprisoned. Since rape is often associated with the concept of adultery, judges could, in theory, accuse the victim of fornication under sharia, hold the victim responsible for the rape, and imprison her. There were no reports that this provision or interpretation of the law was enforced" (page 16-17). "Traditional sharia judges handled many domestic violence cases" (page 17). "The law considers women to be minors, and women faced other legal discrimination. According...more
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"Rape, including spousal rape, is illegal" (page 16).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"Contraception was available at private health centers for those who could afford it" (page 18). "The AFCF stressed that . . . poor women or to those from traditionally lower castes, such as slaves and former slaves, . . . often lacked access to contraception, obstetric and postpartum care, and treatment for sexually transmitted infections. The Mauritanian Association for the Health of Mothers and Children, which operated a center in Nouakchott for rape victims, provided emergency contraception to victims" (page 18-19).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: LRCM-PRACTICE-1

"The government regularly enforced the law, convicting 22 and sentencing two perpetrators to death. Nevertheless, as in years past, wealthy rape suspects reportedly avoided prosecution or, if prosecuted, avoided prison. Families of the victim commonly reached an agreement with the perpetrator for monetary compensation" (page 16).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-3, DSFMF-PRACTICE-2

"Human rights activists and lawyers reported that rape victims were stigmatized, persecuted, and even imprisoned. Since rape is often associated with the concept of adultery, judges could, in theory, accuse the victim of fornication under sharia, hold the victim responsible for the rape, and imprison her. There were no reports that this provision or interpretation of the law was enforced" (page 16-17).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Many children, particularly girls, did not attend school for six years. Children of slave-caste Haratine families often did not receive any education" (page 20).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"Rapists who are single men face penalties of forced labor and whipping, and married rapists are subject to the death penalty" (page 16). "The law prohibits sexual relations with a child under 18 years of age, with penalties of six months to two years in prison and a 120,000 to 180,000 ouguiyas ($363 to $545) fine . . . NGOs asserted the laws were not properly enforced" (page 21).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: AOM-DATA-2

"According to UNICEF in 2011 (the most recent data available), the percentage of children who were married before age 15 dropped from 19 to 15 percent, while the percentage of those married before age 18 fell from 43 to 35 percent" (page 20).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"The government did not enforce the law effectively, and convictions were rare. Most cases went unreported. No reliable government statistics on prosecutions, convictions, and sentences for domestic violence were available . . . Police and the judiciary occasionally intervened in domestic abuse cases, but women rarely sought legal redress, relying instead on family, NGOs, and community leaders to resolve domestic disputes. Traditional sharia judges handled many domestic violence cases. NGOs reported that, in certain cases, they asked police for help to protect victims of domestic violence, but police declined to investigate. The AFCF and other women’s NGOs provided psychologists and shelter to some victims" (page 17).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: INFIB-LAW-1

"The law states that any act or attempt to damage a girl’s sexual organs is punishable by imprisonment and a fine of 120,000 to 300,000 ouguiyas ($363 to $910). Nevertheless, authorities seldom applied the law, since the accompanying implementing law remained provisional . . . During the year the government entered the third phase of a five-year FGM/C action plan, which aims to reinforce FGM/C policy and law, offer education and community support, encourage public declarations of FGM/C abandonment, and establish partnerships and public outreach campaigns. The government’s program, which extends to 2017, focused on communities in the regions of Gorgol, Guidimaka, Hodh El Gharbi, Hodh El Chargui, Assaba, and...more
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Commercial sexual exploitation of children is illegal, and conviction carries penalties of two to five years in prison and a fine of 200,000 to two million ouguiyas ($606 to $6,060). NGOs asserted the laws were not properly enforced" (page 21). "The law prohibits all forms of forced or compulsory labor, including by children. It also criminalizes the practice of slavery and imposes penalties both on government officials who do not take action on reported cases and on those who benefit from contracting forced labor. Although the government made advances toward ending slavery, such as the adoption of the Roadmap for the Eradication of the Vestiges of Slavery, its efforts to...more
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: PW-DATA-1

"Polygyny continued to be relatively unusual among Moors, although its popularity has grown. The practice was more common among sub-Saharan ethnic groups" (page 19).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"Forced labor also occurred in urban centers where young children--often girls--were retained as unpaid household servants" (page 27).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"Following the 2013 legislative elections, 31 women held seats in the 147-member National Assembly" (page 14).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The constitution and law provide for equality for all citizens regardless of race, national origin, sex, or social status, but the government often favored individuals based on racial and tribal affiliation and social status" (page 16). "The law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, disability, religion, political opinion, national origin, citizenship, social origin, sexual orientation and/or gender identity, age, or language, but the government often did not enforce the law" (page 30).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1

"Discrimination against women, female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); early and forced marriage; political marginalization of southern-based (non-Arab) ethnic groups and of the Haratine caste of slave descendants; racial and ethnic discrimination; discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) persons and persons with HIV/AIDS; child labor; and inadequate enforcement of labor laws also occurred" (page 1). "The law states that any act or attempt to damage a girl’s sexual organs is punishable by imprisonment and a fine of 120,000 to 300,000 ouguiyas ($363 to $910). Nevertheless, authorities seldom applied the law, since the accompanying implementing law remained provisional. FGM/C was practiced by all ethnic groups to varying degrees and performed...more
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"The law provides for due process, and defendants enjoy a presumption of innocence. While authorities informed defendants of the charges/accusations against them and provided them with free interpretation services as required, the quality of these services was generally poor, and defendants did not learn of the charges until the investigation was complete. Defendants have the right to a public trial, although juries are not used. They also have the right to be present during trial. All defendants, including the indigent, have the right to legal counsel, but authorities rarely respected this entitlement. Likewise, defendants may confront or question witnesses and present witnesses and evidence in both civil and criminal cases....more
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1, MMR-PRACTICE-1

"The World Health Organization estimated the maternal mortality rate to be 602 per 100,000 live births. This high rate was due to lack of medical equipment, low participation by mothers in programs promoting prenatal care, births without the assistance of health professionals, poor sanitary conditions during birth, and maternal malnutrition. According to UNICEF, skilled health personnel attended approximately 64.5 percent of births. The AFCF stressed that these deficiencies applied in particular to poor women or to those from traditionally lower castes, such as slaves and former slaves, who often lacked access to contraception, obstetric and postpartum care, and treatment for sexually transmitted infections. The Mauritanian Association for the Health of...more
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"The legal marriage age is 18, but authorities rarely enforced the law, and child marriage was widespread. Since consensual sex outside of marriage is illegal, a legal guardian can ask local authorities to permit a girl younger than 18 to marry. Local authorities frequently granted permission. Nevertheless, the government continued to work with UNICEF to implement a program to combat child marriage through judicial and political reforms. It also cooperated with civil society to disseminate the personal status code, which sets the minimum age for marrying at 18 and requires a woman’s consent to seal a union. These efforts appeared to show encouraging results" (page 20).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

"There are no laws against sexual harassment. Women’s NGOs reported that it was a common problem in the workplace" (page 18). "The law provides that men and women should receive equal pay for equal work. The two largest employers, the civil service and the state mining company, observed this law, although most employers in the private sector did not. In the modern wage sector, women also received family benefits, including three months of paid maternity leave" (page 30).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Discrimination against women, female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); early and forced marriage; political marginalization of southern-based (non-Arab) ethnic groups and of the Haratine caste of slave descendants; racial and ethnic discrimination; discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) persons and persons with HIV/AIDS; child labor; and inadequate enforcement of labor laws also occurred" (page 1). "Arranged marriages were increasingly rare, particularly among the Moor population" (page 19).
March 7, 2019, 11:23 a.m.
Countries: Mauritania
Variables: PRN-LAW-1

"The possession of child pornography is illegal, with penalties of two months to one year in prison and a 160,000 to 300,000 ouguiyas ($485 to $910) fine . . . NGOs asserted the laws were not properly enforced" (page 21).