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Latest items for Mexico

Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-DATA-1

"The National Citizens Femicide Observatory, a coalition of human rights and women’s groups in Mexico that studies violence against women, reported that annual female homicide numbers more than doubled between 2007 and 2015, from 1,086 to 2,555" (para 29).
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The effort got a boost on International Women’s Day last month, when President Enrique Peña Nieto called on Mexico 'to launch a frontal assault against all expressions of machismo.' He urged the eradication of 'a deeply rooted machista culture,' one that 'ultimately and truly generates violence against women'" (para 4). "Last year, Mexicans in dozens of cities took to the streets in the first nationally coordinated demonstration against machismo and violence against women. Major Mexican companies are weighing in as well. Tecate, a popular beer brand, started a television advertising campaign last summer featuring a woman covered in bruises. 'A man is defined by how he treats a woman,' the ...more
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Machismo has long been widespread in Mexican society. Male entitlement — reflected in telenovelas, movies, work settings, families and romantic relationships — has been tolerated, even celebrated" (para 1). "Gendes, a research and advocacy group in Mexico City that seeks to improve male behavior through counseling, education and public awareness campaigns, is trying to [confront the entrenched ideas fueling machismo]" (para 6). "The free therapy, given three times a week, seeks to question and address the cultural beliefs that lie at the heart of machismo, said Antonio Vargas, director and founder of Gendes, which is privately funded" (para 12). "In an interview later, Jorge said he had been working hard ...more
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: TRAFF-SCALE-1

"[A] decade ago, the Mexican Congress passed a law that outlined a legal framework for all levels of government to prevent, address and punish gender-based violence" (para 25).
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"Machismo has long been widespread in Mexican society. Male entitlement — reflected in telenovelas, movies, work settings, families and romantic relationships — has been tolerated, even celebrated" (para 1). "Major Mexican companies are weighing in as well. Tecate, a popular beer brand, started a television advertising campaign last summer featuring a woman covered in bruises. 'A man is defined by how he treats a woman,' the voice-over said. 'If you don’t respect women, Tecate is not for you. We don’t want you to buy beer from us'" (para 31).
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"His relationship with his wife had suffered after a violent episode. One night, his wife arrived 30 minutes late to meet him for a movie, and he felt she did not seem sufficiently remorseful. Their argument migrated from the sidewalk to their apartment, where, in a rage, Jorge threw her to the ground and punched her in the face, bloodying her nose" (para 8). "A man named Alejandro said his girlfriend had discovered that he had sent sexually charged WhatsApp messages to a neighbor. The counselors pushed him to examine his behavior. 'I tried to control her by flirting with our neighbor behind her back,' he confessed. 'It is emotional ...more
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LBHO-LAW-2

"Most recently, a 2014 law requires that half of all the candidates fielded by a political party in federal or state legislative elections be women" (para 24).
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-1

"Women have made significant gains in elected office in Mexico, in part because of a series of measures ensuring their greater participation in politics. Most recently, a 2014 law requires that half of all the candidates fielded by a political party in federal or state legislative elections be women" (para 24).
Oct. 11, 2017, 11:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"While one in four girls in Mexico will enter into a union before the age of 18, the rate is more than 30% in some states, including Chiapas and Guerrero. The rate was also much higher in rural areas" (19).
Oct. 11, 2017, 11:09 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ISTD-PRACTICE-1

"Married girls and those living with an older man are more likely than their single peers to suffer violence, sexually transmitted infections and other health complications" (18).
Oct. 11, 2017, 11:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Heather Hamilton, deputy executive director for the charity Girls Not Brides, said: 'You have a situation where a girl is perhaps choosing to be in a union, but only because she lacks other options. Perhaps there is a desire to escape poverty or a violent home environment. But we don’t want a world in which girls are forced to make the least bad choice.'" (13-14).
Oct. 11, 2017, 11:03 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Across Mexico, 81% of marriages among girls aged 12- to 17-years-old are not recognised legally, according to the report by Investigación en Salud y Demografía" (11).
Oct. 11, 2017, 11 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"A law introduced in Mexico in 2014 set the minimum legal age for marriage at 18 for both men and women, but many states do not comply, or make exceptions. In some areas, civil guidance states the minimum age is 14 for girls and 16 for boys" (9).
Oct. 11, 2017, 10:55 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"In Mexico, more than 10% of girls are married under the age of 15. Worldwide, the country has the eighth highest number of child marriages" (7).
Oct. 11, 2017, 10:36 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Researchers found that 83% of married girls had left school, with the number rising to 92% among those living informally with a man. In contrast, just 15% of Mexican girls not in such relationships dropped out of school" (4).
Oct. 11, 2017, 10:35 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MARR-DATA-2

"Of the 320,000-plus Mexican girls between the ages of 12 and 17 who are cohabiting, nearly 70% are with a partner who is at least 11 years their senior, according to a report commissioned by the Ford Foundation" (2).
Sept. 25, 2017, 8:22 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-6

6.0
Sept. 20, 2017, 10:50 a.m.
Countries: China, Mexico, Nepal
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"Since 2012, Jungle Mamas has been collaborating with One Heart World-Wide, a world-renouned organization that has worked to reduce maternal and neonatal health in Nepal, Tibet, and Mexico.Through this collaboration, Jungle Mamas has worked to successfully implement One Heart’s Network of Safety; a proven effective, sustainable, and replicable model that works with all stakeholders—families, communities, local and national governments—in the active engagement of reducing maternal and newborn death. The Network of Safety 'raises awareness, teaches good practices, and distributes essential supplies to ensure that mothers and infants survive delivery and the first months of life'"(para 8-9)
Sept. 20, 2017, 10:49 a.m.
Countries: China, Mexico, Nepal
Variables: MMR-DATA-1

"Since 2012, Jungle Mamas has been collaborating with One Heart World-Wide, a world-renouned organization that has worked to reduce maternal and neonatal health in Nepal, Tibet, and Mexico.Through this collaboration, Jungle Mamas has worked to successfully implement One Heart’s Network of Safety; a proven effective, sustainable, and replicable model that works with all stakeholders—families, communities, local and national governments—in the active engagement of reducing maternal and newborn death. The Network of Safety 'raises awareness, teaches good practices, and distributes essential supplies to ensure that mothers and infants survive delivery and the first months of life'"(para 8-9)
Sept. 20, 2017, 10:48 a.m.
Countries: China, Mexico, Nepal
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"Since 2012, Jungle Mamas has been collaborating with One Heart World-Wide, a world-renouned organization that has worked to reduce maternal and neonatal health in Nepal, Tibet, and Mexico.Through this collaboration, Jungle Mamas has worked to successfully implement One Heart’s Network of Safety; a proven effective, sustainable, and replicable model that works with all stakeholders—families, communities, local and national governments—in the active engagement of reducing maternal and newborn death. The Network of Safety 'raises awareness, teaches good practices, and distributes essential supplies to ensure that mothers and infants survive delivery and the first months of life'"(para 8-9)
Sept. 20, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: China, Mexico, Nepal
Variables: IM-DATA-1

"Since 2012, Jungle Mamas has been collaborating with One Heart World-Wide, a world-renouned organization that has worked to reduce maternal and neonatal health in Nepal, Tibet, and Mexico.Through this collaboration, Jungle Mamas has worked to successfully implement One Heart’s Network of Safety; a proven effective, sustainable, and replicable model that works with all stakeholders—families, communities, local and national governments—in the active engagement of reducing maternal and newborn death. The Network of Safety 'raises awareness, teaches good practices, and distributes essential supplies to ensure that mothers and infants survive delivery and the first months of life'"(para 8-9)
Sept. 20, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: China, Mexico, Nepal
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"Since 2012, Jungle Mamas has been collaborating with One Heart World-Wide, a world-renouned organization that has worked to reduce maternal and neonatal health in Nepal, Tibet, and Mexico.Through this collaboration, Jungle Mamas has worked to successfully implement One Heart’s Network of Safety; a proven effective, sustainable, and replicable model that works with all stakeholders—families, communities, local and national governments—in the active engagement of reducing maternal and newborn death. The Network of Safety 'raises awareness, teaches good practices, and distributes essential supplies to ensure that mothers and infants survive delivery and the first months of life'"(para 8-9)
Sept. 1, 2017, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LO-SCALE-3

3.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 8:51 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LO-SCALE-2

1.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LO-SCALE-1

2.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

“Under a 2014 law, the minimum age for marriage in Mexico is 18 but girls can marry at age 14 and boys at age 16 with parental consent” (para 11).
Aug. 23, 2017, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

“Girls being trafficked for sex in northern Mexico often have been forced into exploitation as under-age child brides by their husbands, a study showed on Thursday. Three out of four girls trafficked in the region were married at a young age, mostly before age 16, according to Mexican and U.S. researchers in a yet-unpublished study” (para 1-2). “The researchers interviewed 603 women working in the sex industry in the Mexican cities of Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, both along the border with the United States. Most said they had been trafficked as under-age brides, often by their husbands, said Jay Silverman, the study's lead author and a professor of medicine at ...more
Aug. 23, 2017, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

“Under a 2012 anti-trafficking law, those convicted of the crime can spend up to 30 years in prison” (para 4). “Under a 2014 law, the minimum age for marriage in Mexico is 18 but girls can marry at age 14 and boys at age 16 with parental consent” (para 11).
Aug. 23, 2017, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

“Human trafficking is believed to be the fastest-growing criminal industry in Mexico, and three-quarters of its victims are sexually exploited women and girls, according to Women United Against Trafficking, an activist group” (para 3). “Nearly 380,000 people are believed to be enslaved in Mexico, according to the 2016 Global Slavery Index published by rights group Walk Free Foundation” (para 5).
Aug. 23, 2017, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-1

“Under a 2012 anti-trafficking law, those convicted of the crime can spend up to 30 years in prison” (para 4).