The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Mexico

April 21, 2021, 10:35 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: IIP-LAW-2

"Federal law prohibits sexual harassment and provides for fines from 250 to 5,000 times the minimum daily wage, but the law was not effectively enforced. Of the 32 states, 16 criminalize sexual harassment, and all states have provisions for punishment when the perpetrator is in a position of power" (Page 6).
April 19, 2021, 4:21 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Palestine, Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-2

3.0
April 19, 2021, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burma/Myanmar, Haiti, Iran, Mexico, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Philippines, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Sudan, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: AOM-SCALE-3

4.0
April 19, 2021, 3:54 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burma/Myanmar, Haiti, Iran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mexico, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, United States, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: AOM-SCALE-2

2.0
April 7, 2021, 10:31 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"In 2020, 96% of births in Mexico were attended by skilled health personnele" (p 45).
April 7, 2021, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DACH-DATA-1

"In 2016, the life expectancy at birth in Mexico was 74.0 years for males and 79.2 years for females" (p 44).
April 2, 2021, 9:47 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: IM-DATA-1

"In 2018, the under-five mortality rate in Mexico was 13 per 1000 live births" (p 45).
March 31, 2021, 3:37 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MMR-SCALE-1

"In 2017, the maternal mortality ratio for women in Mexico was 33 per 100,000 live births" (p 45).
March 31, 2021, 3:22 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MMR-DATA-1

"In 2017, the maternal mortality ratio for women in Mexico was 33 per 100,000 live births" (p 45).
March 30, 2021, 7:36 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"From 2010-2017 in Mexico the proportion of ever-partnered women and girls aged 15-49 years subjected to physical and/or sexual violence by a current or former intimate partner in the previous 12 months was 10%" (p 70).
March 30, 2021, 7:31 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DACH-DATA-3

"From 2010-2019 the proportion of women in Mexico of reproductive age who have their need for family planning satified with modern methods is 79.8%" (p 52).
March 19, 2021, 3:56 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"The adolescent birth rate from 2010-2018 in Mexico is 70.5 per 1000 women aged 15-19 years" (p 52).
March 8, 2021, 9:44 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
Feb. 13, 2021, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

“While rates of violent crime increased globally from 6 to 8.8 incidents per 100,000 persons between 1990 and 2000, much of this increase has been in cities. Sixty per cent of urban residents in low- and middle-income countries have been victims of crime over a five-year period; the rates are as high as 70 per cent in parts of Latin America and the Caribbean and Africa. In Latin America, more than half of the total homicides occur in cities such as Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Mexico City, Lima and Caracas” (pp. 25). “Another important case of urban-based employment among women linked with widespread gender-based violence relates to the femicides...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-DATA-1

“While rates of violent crime increased globally from 6 to 8.8 incidents per 100,000 persons between 1990 and 2000, much of this increase has been in cities. Sixty per cent of urban residents in low- and middle-income countries have been victims of crime over a five-year period; the rates are as high as 70 per cent in parts of Latin America and the Caribbean and Africa (UN Habitat, 2007).In Latin America, more than half of the total homicides occur in cities such as Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Mexico City, Lima and Caracas” (pp. 25). “Another important case of urban-based employment among women linked with widespread gender-based violence relates to...more
Feb. 13, 2021, 12:40 p.m.
Countries: Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Uganda, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

Table 1: Sex ratio and share of female population in urban and rural areas, selected countries in Africa, Latin America and Asia, latest available year (1999–2008) shows sex ratios between urban and rural areas in different countries.
Feb. 10, 2021, 12:36 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Others, like Mauro Vargas's Mexico City-based initiative Gendes, have completely pivoted their services. The initiative became well-known for offering anti-'machismo' therapy for men. Since they have had to shut down in-person therapy sessions, Vargas launched a new hotline three weeks ago to talk down men at risk of becoming violent. The goal, he said, was to complement work by other organisations scrambling to take on the aftermath of the violence.'It's constant. Every single day someone calls and tells us 'I'm calling because I don't want to hit her,' Vargas said. 'At first, it was two calls like this, and they were more like prevention ... Now, at least six or...more
Feb. 10, 2021, 12:36 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"In Mexico, Unda's organisation - Brujas del Mar - has pulled upon its countrywide social media network to bolster existing digital aid for victims and develop new ones. For working women in sectors that are still operating during the lockdown, the group offers digital accompaniment and tracking services for women who have to walk alone in empty streets" (para 22).
Feb. 10, 2021, 12:36 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: SAB-PRACTICE-1

"Unda, a leader of the feminist organisation Brujas del Mar, was one of the organisers of the country's National Women's Strike on March 9, when 6.6 million women did not leave the house to show the Latin American country what society would look like without women" (para 2).
Feb. 10, 2021, 12:36 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"'We're scared because we don't know how long this is going to last,' she said. 'It's bad everywhere, but Mexico is at the top of the list, and it's because we live in a country where we have 98 percent impunity ... we have killers and rapists walking all around us'" (para 6).
Feb. 10, 2021, 12:36 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"In Mexico, Unda's organisation - Brujas del Mar - has pulled upon its countrywide social media network to bolster existing digital aid for victims and develop new ones. For working women in sectors that are still operating during the lockdown, the group offers digital accompaniment and tracking services for women who have to walk alone in empty streets" (22). "Others, like Mauro Vargas's Mexico City-based initiative Gendes, have completely pivoted their services. The initiative became well-known for offering anti-"machismo" therapy for men. Since they have had to shut down in-person therapy sessions, Vargas launched a new hotline three weeks ago to talk down men at risk of becoming violent" (para...more
Jan. 29, 2021, 5:45 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Despite relatively high levels of reporting of family violence to police, women have come to expect little to no response from authorities. 'When a woman is experiencing such violence, she has very little recourse,' Negrete said. 'If she calls the police, they might not come, and even if they do, they have no training in how to respond to family violence. To pursue charges and protection from the violence they must go to the prosecutor’s office, who typically fail to do anything about the complaint'" (para 13).
Jan. 29, 2021, 5:45 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"In early May, the president said he did not believe there had been an increase in domestic violence under the stay-at-home measures. In response, a group of feminists shared an open letter on social media that noted the high number of family violence-related calls to 911 per hour during that period—a figure that comes from his own government’s data, which shows calls to report abuse or violence in the home increased overall by 22.7 percent between February and March. Then, the president claimed 90 percent of these calls were false reports" (para 8).
Jan. 29, 2021, 5:45 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"The Brujas del Mar (Sea Witches), a collective that played a key role in calling for the strike, has swung into action to mitigate the increased risks to women that come with a country facing a period of lockdown. The group has established a hotline for women to access psychological help if they are experiencing domestic violence" (para 6). "The Organized Women of the Department of Political and Social Sciences collective then published a communique accusing department administration of punishing women professors for supporting students who speak out against gender violence, and they disabled the intranet’s functions so that grades could not be assigned and classes could not be scheduled"...more
Jan. 29, 2021, 5:45 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LRW-DATA-1, LRCM-DATA-1

"The last major survey on family violence in Mexico, conducted in 2016, found that for approximately every 100 women aged 15 years and over who have had a partner or husband, 42 of the married women and 59 of the separated, divorced, or widowed women have experienced situations of emotional or economic abuse, or physical or sexual violence during their current or last relationship—a clear indication of women’s overall vulnerability to security risks of all kinds" (para 2).
Jan. 29, 2021, 5:45 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"In 2019, on average, 10 women were killed per day in Mexico, and the figure remained unchanged going into 2020. Moreover, Mexico’s near-total impunity for crime (hovering around a 90 percent rate of impunity) is even worse when it comes to femicides—more like 99 percent, according to the National Citizen’s Observatory on Femicide" (para 2). "Despite relatively high levels of reporting of family violence to police, women have come to expect little to no response from authorities. 'When a woman is experiencing such violence, she has very little recourse,' Negrete said. 'If she calls the police, they might not come, and even if they do, they have no training in...more
Jan. 29, 2021, 5:45 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"The mass demonstrations of early March were largely initiated through online media, and campaigning for gender justice in Mexico continues via those networks while the country remains in lockdown" (para 16). "Other examples of online campaigning include a virtual vigil for Ana Paola, a 13-year-old victim of femicide in her home after stay-at-home measures began, and a virtual protest, coordinated with other countries in Latin America, held on May 9, the day before Mother’s Day, with the purpose of posting material en masse to social media networks, depicting the dangers being faced by women in the home under coronavirus measures" (para 17).
Jan. 29, 2021, 5:45 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LRW-LAW-1, MURDER-LAW-1, UVAW-PRACTICE-1, LO-LAW-1

“Mexico does have a powerful law in place, the General Law on Women’s Access to a Life Free of Violence, which was passed in 2007. The law provided sweeping measures to 'prevent, treat, punish, and eradicate violence against women,' defined as including psychological, physical, economic, patrimonial (involving violation of women’s property rights), and sexual violence; it also defined femicide as a hate crime targeting women. But as too many cases have demonstrated, the mandate is not enough” (para 12).
Jan. 29, 2021, 5:45 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-3

"There’s little doubt that structural sexism and impunity are the greatest barriers to justice for victims of femicide, and to bringing the numbers down. Additionally, indigenous women, transgender women, and women with disabilities face compounded discrimination and risk. Women who work in Mexico’s large informal economy are particularly vulnerable to poverty and violence" (para 10).
Jan. 29, 2021, 5:45 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"On March 8, International Women’s Day, an estimated 100,000 women of all walks of life poured into Mexico City’s center. With a small group of male allies taking up the rear, they marched the mile and a half from the Monument to the Mexican Revolution to the Zócalo, Mexico City’s central plaza. The march coincided with other large demonstrations in cities across the country, from Tapachula to Tijuana. The outsized rallies were just the beginning of a landmark 48-hour effort by Mexican women to demonstrate the urgency of the national emergency of femicide and other violence against women in the country" (para 1). "Following large demonstrations in August and November...more