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Latest items for Mexico

Jan. 4, 2018, 12:33 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Multinational companies benefit from the use of cheap labour, usually employing women from small towns and rural areas, who are presumed to be more docile than men. The turnover is extremely high: women workers are squeezed to the last drop and then replaced by others. Their welfare is of little concern and their human rights are violated as a matter of course, (5)".
Jan. 4, 2018, 12:33 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-LAW-1

"The first data came from the most populated county, the state of Mexico, which surrounds Mexico City, where 840 women were killed between 2011 and 2013. It is unclear how these crimes are classified. and only 145 were investigated as feminicides, (6)". "Between 2011 and 2014, the rate of feminicides increased five times, and between 2013 and 2015 6488 women were killed. In 2016, 3,000 women were been killed between January and mid-October, of which 1,185 have been identified as feminicides. In Mexico, a country of 120 million inhabitants, 77% of feminicides are not prosecuted, with a large proportion of bodies never identified,(7)". "Community organisations and victim’s families have challenged ...more
Jan. 4, 2018, 12:33 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-DATA-1

"The first data came from the most populated county, the state of Mexico, which surrounds Mexico City, where 840 women were killed between 2011 and 2013. It is unclear how these crimes are classified. and only 145 were investigated as feminicides. Additionally, 1,500 women have disappeared between 2005 and 2013, mainly adolescents between 15 and 17 years old, (6)". "Between 2011 and 2014, the rate of feminicides increased five times, and between 2013 and 2015 6488 women were killed. In 2016, 3,000 women were been killed between January and mid-October, of which 1,185 have been identified as feminicides, (7)".
Dec. 17, 2017, 3:32 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ACR-LAW-1

"The Congress of the Mexican state of Tabasco quietly enacted a ban on surrogacy for foreigners on January 19, 2016" (para 1). This law can be seen as either a protection for women who may have been abused as surrogates for childless or same-sex couples. It could also be considered harmful to women who used surrogacy as a form of income. The article does not indicate if this law is considered popular or not by the general public (AA-CODER COMMENT).
Dec. 17, 2017, 3:32 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-1

"The Congress of the Mexican state of Tabasco quietly enacted a ban on surrogacy for foreigners on January 19, 2016" (para 1).
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:07 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-LAW-1

"Despite intense outrage and public protests within the country and throughout the international community, the Mexican federal government has taken little decisive action in investigating the murders and preventing future ones. The state government of Chihuahua, in which Ciudad Juárez is located, has reportedly bungled investigations, and has even been implicated in covering up and/or playing a role in the feminicides. Crime scenes and investigations are often manipulated. In many cases, surviving family members have discovered that Juárez police are equally as responsible for these murders. Approximately 80% of documented murder cases have been corrupted through poorly conducted police and forensic investigation, false and/or forced confessions and the impotence of ...more
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:07 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-2

"The ways in which they are tortured and murdered sets the female victims apart from the city’s male murder victims. Women’s bodies have been found riddled with stab wounds and bite marks, exhibiting signs of rape, mutilated breasts, chopped hair and facial disfiguration. Some women have been tied up with their own shoelaces and others have been stuffed into 55-gallon drums filled with acid" (para 4).
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:07 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1

"At the very core of these femicides lays a factor not only specific to culture in Ciudad Juárez, but in several parts of Latin America – misogyny and machismo mentality" (para 5). "While the situation in Ciudad Juárez can seem hopeless—with Mexican authorities seemingly prepared to do little to stop the violence or provide resources for the vulnerable—the town’s women have increasingly taken matters into their own hands. Their action in the form of protests, rallies and marches has brought the fact of these deaths into the light of day. Women have placed hundreds of small wooden crosses, each painted pink, in the hard ground—one for every murdered or missing ...more
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:07 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

" Many of the victims are factory workers and fit a particular profile: young (usually between 12 and 30 years old), from poor families or neighborhoods and abducted en route to and from public transportation buses known as la ruta. These systemic murders have been termed femicides, or a mass killing of women" (para 2). "Because of this displacement, hundreds of maquila workers are positioned in a place of increased vulnerability as many are forced to commute to and from work at some of the darkest hours of the day and night" (para 3).
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:07 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Domestic violence in households is alarmingly high. Esther Chávez Cano, founding director of the Casa Amiga crisis center in Juárez, stated in a interview with the Center for International Studies of Ohio University that married men often feel that they are entitled to physically abuse their spouses. “[Husbands] say, ‘I have the paper [marriage certificate], so I have more rights to hit,’” she said. And though Mexican machismo alone is not the sole contributing factor to the femicides, it’s through this perpetual violence that a system of abuse and murder becomes normalized and never-ceasing in a city like Juárez" (para 5).
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:07 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-DATA-1

"According to Amnesty International, since 1993 more than 800 women have been brutally mutilated, murdered and had their bodies dumped in the city’s nearby deserts. Though the city also has an unusually high male homicide rate, the methods of and motivations for killing these women are especially disturbing. Many of the victims are factory workers and fit a particular profile: young (usually between 12 and 30 years old), from poor families or neighborhoods and abducted en route to and from public transportation buses known as la ruta. These systemic murders have been termed femicides, or a mass killing of women" (para 2).
Dec. 6, 2017, 5 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ERBG-DATA-5

According to Figure 5, about 5% of economically active women are employed by the agriculture sector, about 18% by the industry sector, and about 77% by the services sector (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 4:59 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

According to Figure 5, about 5% of economically active women are employed by the agriculture sector, about 18% by the industry sector, and about 77% by the services sector (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 5, 2017, 10:23 a.m.
Countries: Brazil, Cameroon, Madagascar, Mexico, South Africa
Variables: ATC-DATA-5

"Since much waged employment is in the informal sector, national labor legislation is unable to ensure the right to a minimum wage or protect women from discrimination. In addition, labor legislation frequently treats the agriculture sector differently from other sectors with regard to issues such as working time, overtime pay, and leave time (ILO 2008, para. 295). The ILO [International Labour Organization] Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations has repeatedly denounced this (FAO, IFAD, and ILO 2010, p. 14). National labor inspectorates are often severely understaffed and lack the capacity to monitor the agriculture sector. This is due, in part, to the cost of dealing with ...more
Dec. 5, 2017, 9:57 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"From the gender perspective, the impacts of CCT [cash transfer] programs are ambiguous. The conditionalities may significantly improve the educational attainments of girls. Since the benefits are generally provided to women as care givers (following the examples of Mexico and Brazil), this strengthens their role within the family)"(53)
Dec. 5, 2017, 9:57 a.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2, AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-DATA-1, NGOFW-DATA-3

"From the gender perspective, the impacts of CCT [cash transfer] programs are ambiguous. The conditionalities may significantly improve the educational attainments of girls. Since the benefits are generally provided to women as care givers (following the examples of Mexico and Brazil), this strengthens their role within the family"(53)
Nov. 30, 2017, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Cyprus, Ireland, Mexico
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

According to AgeOfConsent's data, the legal age of consent is 17 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Nov. 29, 2017, 3:53 p.m.
Countries: Brazil, Cameroon, Madagascar, Mexico, South Africa
Variables: ERBG-DATA-5

"Since much waged employment is in the informal sector, national labor legislation is unable to ensure the right to a minimum wage or protect women from discrimination. In addition, labor legislation frequently treats the agriculture sector differently from other sectors with regard to issues such as working time, overtime pay, and leave time (ILO 2008, para. 295). The ILO Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations has repeatedly denounced this (FAO, IFAD, and ILO 2010, p. 14). National labor inspectorates are often severely understaffed and lack the capacity to monitor the agriculture sector. This is due, in part, to the cost of dealing with a large number ...more
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MURDER-DATA-1

"The National Citizens Femicide Observatory, a coalition of human rights and women’s groups in Mexico that studies violence against women, reported that annual female homicide numbers more than doubled between 2007 and 2015, from 1,086 to 2,555" (para 29).
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The effort got a boost on International Women’s Day last month, when President Enrique Peña Nieto called on Mexico 'to launch a frontal assault against all expressions of machismo.' He urged the eradication of 'a deeply rooted machista culture,' one that 'ultimately and truly generates violence against women'" (para 4). "Last year, Mexicans in dozens of cities took to the streets in the first nationally coordinated demonstration against machismo and violence against women. Major Mexican companies are weighing in as well. Tecate, a popular beer brand, started a television advertising campaign last summer featuring a woman covered in bruises. 'A man is defined by how he treats a woman,' the ...more
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Machismo has long been widespread in Mexican society. Male entitlement — reflected in telenovelas, movies, work settings, families and romantic relationships — has been tolerated, even celebrated" (para 1). "Gendes, a research and advocacy group in Mexico City that seeks to improve male behavior through counseling, education and public awareness campaigns, is trying to [confront the entrenched ideas fueling machismo]" (para 6). "The free therapy, given three times a week, seeks to question and address the cultural beliefs that lie at the heart of machismo, said Antonio Vargas, director and founder of Gendes, which is privately funded" (para 12). "In an interview later, Jorge said he had been working hard ...more
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: TRAFF-SCALE-1

"[A] decade ago, the Mexican Congress passed a law that outlined a legal framework for all levels of government to prevent, address and punish gender-based violence" (para 25).
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"Machismo has long been widespread in Mexican society. Male entitlement — reflected in telenovelas, movies, work settings, families and romantic relationships — has been tolerated, even celebrated" (para 1). "Major Mexican companies are weighing in as well. Tecate, a popular beer brand, started a television advertising campaign last summer featuring a woman covered in bruises. 'A man is defined by how he treats a woman,' the voice-over said. 'If you don’t respect women, Tecate is not for you. We don’t want you to buy beer from us'" (para 31).
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"His relationship with his wife had suffered after a violent episode. One night, his wife arrived 30 minutes late to meet him for a movie, and he felt she did not seem sufficiently remorseful. Their argument migrated from the sidewalk to their apartment, where, in a rage, Jorge threw her to the ground and punched her in the face, bloodying her nose" (para 8). "A man named Alejandro said his girlfriend had discovered that he had sent sexually charged WhatsApp messages to a neighbor. The counselors pushed him to examine his behavior. 'I tried to control her by flirting with our neighbor behind her back,' he confessed. 'It is emotional ...more
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LBHO-LAW-2

"Most recently, a 2014 law requires that half of all the candidates fielded by a political party in federal or state legislative elections be women" (para 24).
Nov. 8, 2017, noon
Countries: Mexico
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-1

"Women have made significant gains in elected office in Mexico, in part because of a series of measures ensuring their greater participation in politics. Most recently, a 2014 law requires that half of all the candidates fielded by a political party in federal or state legislative elections be women" (para 24).
Oct. 11, 2017, 11:10 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"While one in four girls in Mexico will enter into a union before the age of 18, the rate is more than 30% in some states, including Chiapas and Guerrero. The rate was also much higher in rural areas" (19).
Oct. 11, 2017, 11:09 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: ISTD-PRACTICE-1

"Married girls and those living with an older man are more likely than their single peers to suffer violence, sexually transmitted infections and other health complications" (18).
Oct. 11, 2017, 11:05 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Heather Hamilton, deputy executive director for the charity Girls Not Brides, said: 'You have a situation where a girl is perhaps choosing to be in a union, but only because she lacks other options. Perhaps there is a desire to escape poverty or a violent home environment. But we don’t want a world in which girls are forced to make the least bad choice.'" (13-14).
Oct. 11, 2017, 11:03 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Across Mexico, 81% of marriages among girls aged 12- to 17-years-old are not recognised legally, according to the report by Investigación en Salud y Demografía" (11).