The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Morocco

Jan. 6, 2018, 8:14 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-PRACTICE-7

"'Getting groped or touched by sexual harassers would happen on average once a month [in Cairo],' recalls Sara, the daughter of an Egyptian mother and a Moroccan father. Sara was born and raised in Kuwait"(1)
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Ultimately, the bill passed, though it has yet to go into effect" (para 9).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2, DV-LAW-2

"While the bill includes protective measures, such as removing abusers from the home and forbidding contact with the victim, it does not address other aspects of spousal abuse, such as marital rape" (para 10).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2, DV-PRACTICE-2

"Many Moroccan women face practical obstacles in seeking protection from domestic violence due to patriarchal norms and financial constraints" (para 11).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"In response to both these numbers and more than three decades of advocacy led by women’s groups, two ministries — the Ministry of Solidarity, Women, Family and Social Development and the Ministry of Justice and Liberties — created a draft law and placed it before the general secretariat in September 2013. Due to criticism from women’s groups of the inadequacy of the scope of definition and protections provided under the proposed law, Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane placed the law under a direct commission to be revised, and it was presented before the general secretariat yet again in July 2016" (para 8).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: GP-DATA-3, GP-DATA-4

"While Minister of Solidarity, Women, Family and Social Development Bassima Hakkaoui is a member of the PJD, the party’s views on women’s rights are more conservative than those of Moroccan activists who work on gender-based violence" (para 7).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"While Minister of Solidarity, Women, Family and Social Development Bassima Hakkaoui is a member of the PJD, the party’s views on women’s rights are more conservative than those of Moroccan activists who work on gender-based violence. . . . A 2009 survey conducted by the Moroccan High Commission for Planning found that among women aged 18-65, 62.8 percent reported experiencing domestic violence. . . . Due to criticism from women’s groups of the inadequacy of the scope of definition and protections provided under the proposed law, Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane placed the law under a direct commission to be revised . . . At first glance, it appears as though ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"Two ministries — the Ministry of Solidarity, Women, Family and Social Development and the Ministry of Justice and Liberties — created a draft law and placed it before the general secretariat in September 2013. Due to criticism from women’s groups of the inadequacy of the scope of definition and protections provided under the proposed law, Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane placed the law under a direct commission to be revised, and it was presented before the general secretariat yet again in July 2016 . . . Ultimately, the bill passed, though it has yet to go into effect" (para 8-9).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"In response to both these numbers and more than three decades of advocacy led by women’s groups, two ministries — the Ministry of Solidarity, Women, Family and Social Development and the Ministry of Justice and Liberties — created a draft law and placed it before the general secretariat in September 2013. Due to criticism from women’s groups of the inadequacy of the scope of definition and protections provided under the proposed law, Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane placed the law under a direct commission to be revised, and it was presented before the general secretariat yet again in July 2016" (para 8). "The law does not draw upon the expertise of ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"In response to both these numbers and more than three decades of advocacy led by women’s groups, two ministries — the Ministry of Solidarity, Women, Family and Social Development and the Ministry of Justice and Liberties — created a draft law and placed it before the general secretariat in September 2013. Due to criticism from women’s groups of the inadequacy of the scope of definition and protections provided under the proposed law, Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane placed the law under a direct commission to be revised, and it was presented before the general secretariat yet again in July 2016. Though the Moroccan Justice and Legislation Parliamentary Committee consists of 44 ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"A 2009 survey conducted by the Moroccan High Commission for Planning found that among women aged 18-65, 62.8 percent reported experiencing domestic violence" (para 8).
Nov. 30, 2017, 5:19 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-2

"The niqab, which leaves the area around the eyes uncovered, is also worn in Salafist circles and in more conservative regions in the north, from where thousands of jihadists have gone to fight in Syria and Iraq" (para 7).
Nov. 30, 2017, 5:19 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1

"Morocco has banned the production and sale of burqa full-face Muslim veils for security reasons (para 1). "In Taroudant in southern Morocco, authorities ordered traders to stop making and selling burqas and to liquidate their stock within 48 hours, the reports said" (para 9). "It was unclear if Morocco plans to follow in the footsteps of some European countries such as France and Belgium where it is illegal to wear full veils in public" (para 11).
Nov. 30, 2017, 5:19 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: RCDW-LAW-2

"Morocco has banned the production and sale of burqa full-face Muslim veils for security reasons, media reports said Tuesday" (para 1).
Nov. 30, 2017, 5:19 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1

"Most women in Morocco, whose King Mohammed VI favours a moderate version of Islam, prefer the hijab headscarf that does not cover the face" (para 6).
Nov. 8, 2017, 10:49 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The interior minister didn't provide an explanation [for the ban on producing or selling burqas] , but the news quickly made the rounds online"(para 6)
Nov. 8, 2017, 10:49 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DTCP-LAW-1

"The new measure [banning the production and sale of burqas] comes in addition to tightened controls on religious activities in all Moroccan mosques, with preventative checks on the sermons"(para 7). If religious activities are being regulated, then religious or customary law may not have force in this society (ENB-Coder Comment)
Nov. 8, 2017, 10:49 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1, RCDW-LAW-2

"Morocco's Interior Ministry has banned the production and sale of the burqa, the full-length covering for women that leaves only the eyes visible, according to notices delivered by law enforcement to street vendors, wholesalers, tailors, and industrial producers. Security forces made the country's highest police authority, the caid, compile a form that trickled down to local vendors. 'It is prohibited to produce and sell burqa. You are invited to get rid of your stock within the next 48 hours. Those who contravene will have their merchandise seized and their store closed,' read the notice. The Moroccan version of a burqa, which costs between 50-60 dirhams (about 5-6 euros), is different ...more
Nov. 8, 2017, 10:49 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1, RCDW-PRACTICE-2

"Morocco's Interior Ministry has banned the production and sale of the burqa, the full-length covering for women that leaves only the eyes visible, according to notices delivered by law enforcement to street vendors, wholesalers, tailors, and industrial producers. Security forces made the country's highest police authority, the caid, compile a form that trickled down to local vendors. 'It is prohibited to produce and sell burqa. You are invited to get rid of your stock within the next 48 hours. Those who contravene will have their merchandise seized and their store closed,' read the notice. The Moroccan version of a burqa, which costs between 50-60 dirhams (about 5-6 euros), is different ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Jihan (pseudonym), 18, told Human Rights Watch that she married a man more than 10 years her senior when she was 15 or 16"(4)."Fatima (pseudonym), 34, from Fez, married when she was 17 and had two children with her husband"(6)."Khadija (pseudonym), 23, married in 2011 [this report was published in 2016] and lived with her husband in Oujda. At the time of the interview, she had a 7-month-old son and was pregnant"(8)."Safaa (pseudonym), 27, had a 'fatiha' marriage (traditional marriage) at age 15 that was not officially registered.She lived with her husband in a village between the cities of Settat and Khouribga. They have a son who was 3 years ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"A national survey of women aged 18 to 65 by the Moroccan High Commission for Planning found that in 2009 nearly two-thirds – 62.8 percent – had experienced physical, psychological, sexual, or economic violence"(1)."She [Shayma] said that two months into their marriage, he started having an affair, then started to beat her. She said he would punch her, throw her from the bed, and one time kicked her in her belly when she was pregnant. She said he raped her many times, and demanded money from her"(9)
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"Women from various regions of Morocco hold placards as they protest against violence towards women, in Rabat, November 24, 2013. The placard reads, 'In memory of all women victims of violence'"(1)."Human Rights Watch in September 2015, interviewed 20 women and girls who had suffered domestic abuse. They said that their husbands, partners, and other family members punched, kicked, burned, stabbed, and raped them, or subjected them to other abuse. Human Rights Watch also interviewed lawyers, women’s rights activists, and representatives of organizations providing shelter and services to survivors of domestic violence"(1)."A national survey of women aged 18 to 65 by the Moroccan High Commission for Planning found that in 2009 ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-2

"Jihan said that in August, after many more beatings, she asked her husband for a divorce. He replied, 'You want a divorce? You can have it this way.' Then he punched her in the eye and attempted to slash her face with a knife. She raised her arm in defense, and he slashed her arm instead"(5)."Jihan was staying at a shelter run by a nongovernmental organization at the time of the interview [she is a victim of domestic violence and marital rape], and felt she had nowhere else to turn. She said she wanted a divorce, but her father refused to hand over her marriage certificate for the divorce application. ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: NGOFW-PRACTICE-1

"Moroccan police, prosecutors, judges, and other authorities often fail to prevent domestic abuse, punish the abusers, or assist survivors, Human Rights Watch said today in a letter to the Moroccan government. In part, that is because Moroccan laws don’t provide officials with guidance on responding effectively"(1)."In its letter to the two ministries [Ministry of Solidarity, Women, Family and Social Development and the Ministry of Justice and Liberties], Human Rights Watch noted both positive aspects of the bills as well as provisions that, if adopted, would set rights back"(3)."The Moroccan government should also ensure meaningful participation by nongovernmental groups and domestic violence survivors in the reform process"(4)
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Elham said her husband started abusing her four months into the marriage. 'He would beat me violently,' she said. 'He would cover my nose and mouth until I lost consciousness. He did this to shut me up when I cried or shouted so people could hear me. He wanted to kill me.' Starting when the twins were 4 months old, he would from time to time take the children and kick her out of the house, she said. She would intermittently take work as a domestic worker to have somewhere to stay"(7)
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-2

"Human Rights Watch in September 2015, interviewed 20 women and girls who had suffered domestic abuse. They said that their husbands, partners, and other family members punched, kicked, burned, stabbed, and raped them, or subjected them to other abuse"(1)."A national survey of women aged 18 to 65 by the Moroccan High Commission for Planning found that in 2009 nearly two-thirds – 62.8 percent – had experienced physical, psychological, sexual, or economic violence. Of the sample interviewed, 55 percent reported 'conjugal' violence and 13.5 percent reported 'familial' violence. Only 3 percent of those who had experienced conjugal violence had reported it to the authorities"(1)."'Women described turning up at police stations in ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-4

"Safaa (pseudonym), 27, had a 'fatiha' marriage (traditional marriage) at age 15 that was not officially registered.She lived with her husband in a village between the cities of Settat and Khouribga. They have a son who was 3 years old at the time of the interview"(8-9)."Human Rights Watch recommended...The bills should clearly define 'domestic violence,' and criminalize marital rape. In line with UN standards, it should include former spouses and individuals in non-marital intimate relationships, among other categories, as well as married cohabiting spouses"(10)
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: LRCM-LAW-1

"Jihan said her husband abused her from the outset of the marriage...her husband raped her repeatedly. 'He forced me [to have sex], even if I refused.' She said he beat her every few days, once banging her head on the kitchen sink and causing a gash that required stitches"(5). Jihan said she wanted a divorce but her father would not give her the marriage certificate required for the divorce application because he said women didn't get divorced in his family (ENB-Coder Comment)."She [Fatima] said her husband started abusing her after six years of marriage...He also raped her frequently, she said. 'He forced me to have sex with him and do ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-1

"Jihan said that in August, after many more beatings, she asked her husband for a divorce. He replied, 'You want a divorce? You can have it this way.' Then he punched her in the eye and attempted to slash her face with a knife. She raised her arm in defense, and he slashed her arm instead"(5)."Jihan was staying at a shelter run by a nongovernmental organization at the time of the interview [she is a victim of domestic violence and marital rape], and felt she had nowhere else to turn. She said she wanted a divorce, but her father refused to hand over her marriage certificate for the divorce application. ...more
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"Moroccan police, prosecutors, judges, and other authorities often fail to prevent domestic abuse, punish the abusers, or assist survivors, Human Rights Watch said today in a letter to the Moroccan government. In part, that is because Moroccan laws don’t provide officials with guidance on responding effectively"(1)."Human Rights Watch in September 2015, interviewed 20 women and girls who had suffered domestic abuse. They said that their husbands, partners, and other family members punched, kicked, burned, stabbed, and raped them, or subjected them to other abuse. Human Rights Watch also interviewed lawyers, women’s rights activists, and representatives of organizations providing shelter and services to survivors of domestic violence"(1)."'Many women and girls enduring ...more