The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Morocco

Feb. 15, 2020, 6:34 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

The gender parity index for gross secondary school enrollment (i.e. the ratio of girls to boys enrolled at the secondary level) is 0.91497 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Dec. 18, 2019, 5:05 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chad, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Macedonia, Madagascar, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Qatar, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Solomon Islands, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: TRAFF-SCALE-1

2.0
Dec. 16, 2019, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"Other forms of violence highlighted in the study entailed psychological violence, digital or internet-based violence, as well as sexual assaults in public spaces or in work settings" (para 15). "12.4% of Moroccan women faced sexual assaults in public spaces in the past twelve months, according to the survey, with the break down in terms of categories being: 66.5% of sexual nature, 49.1% of psychological nature, and 33.2% were physical assaults" (para 16). "24.3% of female employees reported having been sexually assaulted, while 13.4% said they were victims of digital gendered violence" (para 17).
Dec. 16, 2019, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"The study, which was sponsored by the government and conducted between January and March of this year, found that domestic violence and gender-based assaults are still alive and well in Morocco’s social fabric" (para 5). "For women to file complaints against their partners, male relatives, or bosses, they first ought to know about the existence of the legal frameworks in their favor, as well as the administrative process needed to make use of those legal instruments. She said in this regard that the government and regional authorities must put more efforts in awareness raising campaigns to 'inform and educate' women about their rights. Hakkaoui emphasized that women particularly need to...more
Dec. 16, 2019, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Hakkaoui highlighted the country’s deep-seated patriarchy, arguing that societal constraints are keeping most victims of gender-based violence from speaking about their sometimes immensely traumatizing experiences" (para 3). "The study, which was sponsored by the government and conducted between January and March of this year, found that domestic violence and gender-based assaults are still alive and well in Morocco’s social fabric. The minister called gender-based violence a “prevailing reality” in Morocco, indicating that the national average for gendered violence stood at 54.4% at the time of the survey" (para 5). "[Bassima Hakkaoui] said in this regard that the government and regional authorities must put more efforts in awareness raising campaigns to...more
Dec. 16, 2019, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"The two categories had a point in common: most of the women concerned are more often than not 'educated' and 'well-accomplished.' The statistics suggest that the more a woman is seen as 'educated' and 'emancipated,' the greater the likelihood of her facing gendered violence online or in 'professional' settings" (para 18).
Dec. 16, 2019, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"Bassima Hakkaoui, the Moroccan Minister for Family, Solidarity, Equality, and Social Development . . . highlighted the country’s deep-seated patriarchy, arguing that societal constraints are keeping most victims of gender-based violence from speaking about their sometimes immensely traumatizing experiences" (para 2-3). "Resigned to the patriarchal stereotypes of 'brave women' whose courage fundamentally resides in 'supporting the consequences,' however horrifying, of marriage or motherhood, only 6% of victims reported their situation to authorities.The contrast between the staggeringly high number of existing cases and the insignificant number of reported incidents may also have to do with the prevailing societal belief that families’ dirty laundries are not to be exposed in public" (para...more
Dec. 16, 2019, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: NGOFW-PRACTICE-1

"[Bassima Hakkaoui] said in this regard that the government and regional authorities must put more efforts in awareness raising campaigns to 'inform and educate' women about their rights. Hakkaoui emphasized that women particularly need to be empowered and taught about human rights to embolden them to file complaints against their abusers" (para 14).
Dec. 16, 2019, 9:48 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"The national average for gendered violence stood at 54.4% at the time of the survey" (para 5). "Surprisingly, perhaps, the survey’s findings established that domestic violence is more pervasive in urban settings, with 55.8% women reported to have experienced it in some form—pointed or more subtle— between January and March. The figure stood at the slightly lower 51.6% for women in rural, remote zones. The survey predictably found that women aged 25-29 are the biggest victims of the bleak practice. 59.8% of women in that age category are said to have encountered gender-based violence in the past twelve months" (para 6-7).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ABO-PRACTICE-1

"The abortion operations were conducted in a private apartment in Marrakech, the group were charging MAD 3000 ($311) for the illegal procedures" (para 4).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MMR-PRACTICE-1

"Abortion in Morocco is legal only in the cases of married women can prove that pregnancy will harm their health, in these cases, their husband must also sanction the procedure" (para 8).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MMR-DATA-1

"Around 4.2% of maternal death is due to illegal abortions" (para 7).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ABO-DATA-1

"According to a report by the Moroccan Association for Family Planning (AMPF), the number of abortions carried out in Morocco every day is estimated to stand between 50,000 and 80,000" (para 1).
Dec. 6, 2019, 2:14 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ABO-LAW-1

"Article 453 of the Moroccan penal code states that a doctor found to have carried out an abortion may be sentenced to between 1 and 5 years in prison. Women caught undergoing illegal abortions will also receive prison sentences of between 6 months and 2 years" (1). "Abortion in Morocco is legal only in the cases of married women can prove that pregnancy will harm their health, in these cases, their husband must also sanction the procedure" (para 8).
Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Fiji, Gabon, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Niger, North Korea, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Korea, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Zambia
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

2.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Comoros, East Timor, Egypt, Fiji, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Moldova, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

2.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Law 27.14 criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking and prescribed penalties of five to 10 years’ imprisonment and fines, which were sufficiently stringent, and with regard to sex trafficking, commensurate with penalties for other serious crimes, such as rape. The law criminalized child trafficking as an aggravated offense, with prescribed penalties of 20 to 30 years’ imprisonment and a fine of between $21,390 and $213,860. Several pre-existing laws used during the reporting period criminalized some forms of sex and labor trafficking. Generally, penalties under these laws were not sufficiently stringent. Morocco’s penal code criminalized forced child labor through Article 467-2, which prescribed penalties of one to three years’ imprisonment, which...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government reportedly continued to encourage victims to cooperate in investigations against their traffickers, but it did not report the number of victims who did so during the reporting period, nor did it report if victims received restitution from traffickers or measures taken to protect witness confidentiality. The government reportedly provided legal alternatives to the removal of foreign victims of trafficking to countries where they might face retribution or hardship" (344).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Morocco, and traffickers exploit Moroccan victims abroad. Documented and undocumented foreign migrants, especially women and children, are highly vulnerable to forced labor and sex trafficking in Morocco and as they transit through Morocco to reach Europe. In 2018, the number of sub-Saharan migrants clandestinely entering the country more than doubled, a majority of whom intend to transit Morocco on their way to Europe. Some female undocumented migrants, primarily from Sub-Saharan Africa and a small but growing number from South Asia, are coerced into prostitution and forced labor in Morocco. Criminal networks operating in Oujda on...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Morocco does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Morocco remained on Tier 2. These efforts included the identification of more victims, the designation of 42 prosecutors to specialize in trafficking cases, and the conviction of five traffickers. It also took steps toward implementing a draft national victim referral mechanism. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. It remained without victim identification and referral procedures, and it did not report proactively identifying trafficking victims, especially among...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"In 2018, the government reported it identified 131 male and female victims, including Moroccan victims who were exploited abroad and foreign victims exploited in Morocco. In comparison, in 2017, the government identified 10 victims of trafficking, including sex trafficking, forced labor, and forced begging. In 2018, the government reported that it assisted 85 foreign victims and referred 37 Moroccan victims to Ministry of Justice units and civil society organizations for appropriate care" (344).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
Aug. 3, 2019, 7:10 p.m.
Countries: Botswana, Morocco, Rwanda, Tunisia
Variables: POLY-LAW-1

"Polygamy is prohibited in Botswana, Rwanda and Tunisia, and highly restricted in Morocco, and so women who marry into these arrangements have no legal protection" (10)
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

A woman in Morocco can legally choose where she lives in the same way as a man (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

Women in Morocco are not legally required to obey their husbands. Women cannot be head of hosuehold in the same way as a man (116). In Morocco, the original owner of any property legally administers the property in marriage (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MULV-LAW-1

The government of Morocco does not provide for valuation of nonmonetary contributions, such as staying at home to take care of children or other dependents (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: CL-LAW-1

The government of Morocco does not provide for valuation of nonmonetary contributions, such as staying at home to take care of the elderly and disabled (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

Moroccan law mandates nondiscrimination based on gender in employment. The dismissal of pregnant workers in Morocco is prohibited. There is legislation on sexual harassment in employment, but not education. There are criminal penalties and civil remedies for sexual harassment in employment (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

Women make up 26% of the total labor force in Morocco (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

Sons and daughters do not have equal inheritance rights in Morocco (116).