The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Morocco

Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Fiji, Gabon, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Niger, North Korea, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Korea, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Zambia
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

2.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Comoros, East Timor, Egypt, Fiji, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Moldova, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

2.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Law 27.14 criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking and prescribed penalties of five to 10 years’ imprisonment and fines, which were sufficiently stringent, and with regard to sex trafficking, commensurate with penalties for other serious crimes, such as rape. The law criminalized child trafficking as an aggravated offense, with prescribed penalties of 20 to 30 years’ imprisonment and a fine of between $21,390 and $213,860. Several pre-existing laws used during the reporting period criminalized some forms of sex and labor trafficking. Generally, penalties under these laws were not sufficiently stringent. Morocco’s penal code criminalized forced child labor through Article 467-2, which prescribed penalties of one to three years’ imprisonment, which...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government reportedly continued to encourage victims to cooperate in investigations against their traffickers, but it did not report the number of victims who did so during the reporting period, nor did it report if victims received restitution from traffickers or measures taken to protect witness confidentiality. The government reportedly provided legal alternatives to the removal of foreign victims of trafficking to countries where they might face retribution or hardship" (344).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Morocco, and traffickers exploit Moroccan victims abroad. Documented and undocumented foreign migrants, especially women and children, are highly vulnerable to forced labor and sex trafficking in Morocco and as they transit through Morocco to reach Europe. In 2018, the number of sub-Saharan migrants clandestinely entering the country more than doubled, a majority of whom intend to transit Morocco on their way to Europe. Some female undocumented migrants, primarily from Sub-Saharan Africa and a small but growing number from South Asia, are coerced into prostitution and forced labor in Morocco. Criminal networks operating in Oujda on...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Morocco does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Morocco remained on Tier 2. These efforts included the identification of more victims, the designation of 42 prosecutors to specialize in trafficking cases, and the conviction of five traffickers. It also took steps toward implementing a draft national victim referral mechanism. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. It remained without victim identification and referral procedures, and it did not report proactively identifying trafficking victims, especially among...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"In 2018, the government reported it identified 131 male and female victims, including Moroccan victims who were exploited abroad and foreign victims exploited in Morocco. In comparison, in 2017, the government identified 10 victims of trafficking, including sex trafficking, forced labor, and forced begging. In 2018, the government reported that it assisted 85 foreign victims and referred 37 Moroccan victims to Ministry of Justice units and civil society organizations for appropriate care" (344).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
Aug. 3, 2019, 7:10 p.m.
Countries: Botswana, Morocco, Rwanda, Tunisia
Variables: POLY-LAW-1

"Polygamy is prohibited in Botswana, Rwanda and Tunisia, and highly restricted in Morocco, and so women who marry into these arrangements have no legal protection" (10)
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

A woman in Morocco can legally choose where she lives in the same way as a man (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

Women in Morocco are not legally required to obey their husbands. Women cannot be head of hosuehold in the same way as a man (116). In Morocco, the original owner of any property legally administers the property in marriage (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MULV-LAW-1

The government of Morocco does not provide for valuation of nonmonetary contributions, such as staying at home to take care of children or other dependents (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: CL-LAW-1

The government of Morocco does not provide for valuation of nonmonetary contributions, such as staying at home to take care of the elderly and disabled (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

Moroccan law mandates nondiscrimination based on gender in employment. The dismissal of pregnant workers in Morocco is prohibited. There is legislation on sexual harassment in employment, but not education. There are criminal penalties and civil remedies for sexual harassment in employment (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

Women make up 26% of the total labor force in Morocco (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

Sons and daughters do not have equal inheritance rights in Morocco (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

Primary education in Morocco is free and compulsory (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-4

Women are not able to work in the same industries as men in Morocco (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ATFPA-LAW-1

In Morocco, there is legislation designating head of household status (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: GIC-LAW-1

There is paid maternity leave available to women in Morocco of at least 14 weeks. Women receive at least 2/3 of their wages for the duration of their maternity leave. The government pays for 100% of maternity leave benefits. There is a difference of 1 between the leave reserved for women and men relative to leave reserved for women as a function of who pays. There is no paid parental leave. Mothers are guaranteed an equivalent position after returning to work from maternity leave. The government supports or provides childcare services. Childcare payments are not tax deductible (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: MARR-LAW-3

A woman can apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man. A woman in Morocco can sign a contract without requiring the presence of her husband or male relatives (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

Women in Morocco can work the same night hours as men. Women cannot work in jobs deemed hazardous, arduous, or morally inappropriate. Women are not able to perform the same tasks at work as men (116). The ages at which women and men can retire with full pension benefits are equal. The mandatory retirement ages for men and women are the same (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

Discrimination based on marital status is prohibited in access to credit in Morocco (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

A woman in Morocco can legally get a job in the same way as a man. Women can work the same night hours as men. Women are not able to work in jobs deemed hazardous, arduous, or morally inappropriate. Women are not able to perform the same tasks at work as men. Women cannot work in the same industries as men (116). The ages at which men and women can retire with full pension benefits are equal. The mandatory retirement ages for men aand women are the same (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ERBG-DATA-1

Morrocan law does mandate equal remuneration for work of equal value. The ages at which men and women can retire with full pension benefits are equal. The mandatory retirement ages for men and women are the same (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DV-LAW-1

There is not legislation specifically addressing domestic violence in Morocco, but aggravated penalties do exist (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: LRW-LAW-3, DV-LAW-3

A woman's testimony carries the same evidentiary weight in court as a man's (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: GIC-LAW-3

There is paid maternity leave available to women in Morocco of at least 14 weeks. Women receive at least 2/3 of their wages for the duration of their maternity leave. The government pays for 100% of maternity leave benefits. There is no paid parental leave. Mothers are guaranteed an equivalent position after returning to work from maternity leave. The government supports or provides childcare services. Childcare payments are not tax deductible (116). Parents in Morocco are not able to work flexibly (116). Working flexibly, such as working from home or taking partial days off to care for children, could be considered a childcare benefit (EJ-CODER COMMENT).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Morocco can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (116).
May 21, 2019, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: IIP-LAW-2, AFE-PRACTICE-1

There is not legislation on sexual harassment in education in Morocco (116).