The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Namibia

Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Belgium, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Finland, Mexico, Namibia, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Spain, Sweden
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

0.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Rep, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Montenegro, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

1.0more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The 2004 Prevention of Organized Crime Act (POCA) criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking and prescribed penalties of up to 50 years’ imprisonment or a fine not exceeding 1 million Namibian dollars ($69,690). These penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with punishments prescribed for other serious crimes, such as rape. In March 2018, the president signed the Combating of Trafficking in Persons Act, which explicitly criminalizes human trafficking and provides protection measures for victims of trafficking and it was promulgated in April 2018; however, the implementing regulations required for the law to be fully operational were not finalized by the end of the reporting period"...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government requested information and offered repatriation assistance in a case involving five Namibian child trafficking victims exploited in the United Kingdom. While the government had no formal policy to provide residence permits to foreign victims of trafficking, during previous reporting periods, government officials made ad-hoc arrangements for victims to remain in Namibia" (348).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Namibia, and traffickers exploit victims from Namibia abroad (…) Namibian children are subjected to forced labor in agriculture, cattle herding, and domestic service, and to sex trafficking in Windhoek and Walvis Bay. A 2015 media report alleged foreign sex tourists from southern Africa and Europe exploit child sex trafficking victims (...) Children from less affluent neighboring countries may be subjected to sex trafficking and forced labor, including in street vending in Windhoek and other cities as well as in the fishing sector. Angolan children may be brought to Namibia for forced labor in cattle herding"...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Namibia does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Namibia remained on Tier 2. These efforts included more investigations and prosecutions of potential traffickers and convicting traffickers for the first time in two years. The government referred to care a higher percentage of identified victims and facilitated the safe repatriation of more foreign victims. In partnership with an international organization the government finalized a National Referral Mechanism (NRM) and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) to guide front-line officials in the identification of victims...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"The government identified 21 trafficking victims, including five women, 10 girls, and six boys and referred 14 victims to an NGO shelter, which was partially government-funded. The government reunified five Namibian child victims with their parents and repatriated two Zambian nationals. This was compared to 21 victims identified and five referred in 2017. Seven victims were Namibian and 14 were foreign nationals from Zambia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Angola. Thirteen victims were exploited in forced labor, including domestic servitude and cattle herding, seven were sex trafficking victims, and one victim was exploited in both sex trafficking and forced labor" (348).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Cuba, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Georgia, Ghana, Indonesia, Israel, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Libya, Lithuania, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Suriname, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

3.0
Aug. 3, 2019, 6:47 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"The customary law rules on inheritance vary among communities, depending on whether matrilineal or patrilineal kinship systems are in use. According to Section 26 of the Communal Land Reform Act, a customary land right ends when the person who held that right dies. Customary law, which is applied in this case, states that following the death, the customary land right reverts back to the chief or traditional authority for reallocation. The customary right must be reallocated to the surviving spouse, if s/he consents to such allocation, or to a child of the deceased if there is no surviving spouse or if the spouse does not accept the allocation of the...more
Aug. 3, 2019, 6:36 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

"Women and children are often discriminated against in relation to inheritance in Namibia. In the north of the country, tradition dictates that when a married man dies, all his possessions go to his family with the exception that the state retains ownership of the land which is then redistributed to the community. In effect, the customary law authorities ignore the widow’s right to inherit the use of the land" (250)
Aug. 3, 2019, 6:30 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-3, POLY-LAW-1

"Customary marriages in most communities are potentially polygamous and not registered. These marriages are regulated primarily by unwritten customary laws that differ from community to community. For example, in Herero communities, civil marriages are usually technically in community of property, while husband and wife have separate movable property in terms of customary law. It is not uncommon, in regions other than the Caprivi, for a couple to marry in terms of both civil and customary law and to rely upon different legal and social norms, depending on the situation at hand. It also occurs that a man is married under civil law to one wife and is cohabiting with a...more
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: ATDW-LAW-5, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2, GIC-LAW-1, GIC-LAW-3

"The law generally provides for the same legal status and rights for women as for men, with three exceptions: first, some elements of customary family law provide for different treatment of women, such as providing different grounds for divorce and different divorce procedures; second, the property law of a marriage is based solely on the domicile of the husband at the time of the marriage; and third the law grants maternity leave to mothers but not paternity leave to fathers" (Pg 15).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"The law defines rape in broad terms and allows for the prosecution of spousal rape. The courts tried numerous cases of rape during the year, and the government generally enforced court sentences providing between five and 45 years’ imprisonment for those convicted. Between January and July, police received reports of 565 rapes. Women’s groups and NGOs believed the actual prevalence of rape was higher, with only a small fraction of cases prosecuted and fewer still resulting in conviction. Factors hampering rape prosecutions included limited police capacity and the withdrawal of allegations by alleged victims after the filing of charges. Many rape cases are heard by traditional authorities rather than in...more
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The constitution and law prohibit discrimination based on disability, sex, race, color, ethnic origin, religion, creed, or social or economic status" (Pg 13).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IAW-LAW-1

"Traditional practices that permit family members to confiscate the property of deceased men from their widows and children continued" (Pg 15).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3, LO-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The law prohibits gender-based discrimination, including employment discrimination. Women nonetheless experienced discrimination in such areas as obtaining credit, salary level, owning and managing businesses, education, and housing (see section 7.d.)" (Pg 15).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"There were 15 Gender-based Violence Protection Units (formerly called women and child protection units) staffed with police officers, social workers, legal advisors, and medical personnel trained to assist victims of sexual assault. The Ministries of Justice, Health and Social Services, and Gender Equality and Child Welfare, along with NGOs, provided training to some members of these units. Some magistrate courts provided special courtrooms with a cubicle constructed of one-way glass and child-friendly waiting rooms to protect vulnerable witnesses from open testimony. A privately run shelter for victims of GBV violence in the Khomas region operated effectively. The Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare built shelters in the other regions....more
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

"The law explicitly prohibits sexual harassment in the workplace. Employees who leave their jobs due to sexual harassment may be entitled to legal “remedies available to an employee who has been unfairly dismissed.” The law against sexual harassment was not frequently enforced, but there were few public complaints about lack of enforcement" (Pg 14).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, LRW-DATA-1

"The law defines rape in broad terms and allows for the prosecution of spousal rape. The courts tried numerous cases of rape during the year, and the government generally enforced court sentences providing between five and 45 years’ imprisonment for those convicted. Between January and July, police received reports of 565 rapes. Women’s groups and NGOs believed the actual prevalence of rape was higher, with only a small fraction of cases prosecuted and fewer still resulting in conviction. Factors hampering rape prosecutions included limited police capacity and the withdrawal of allegations by alleged victims after the filing of charges. Many rape cases are heard by traditional authorities rather than in...more
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"The minimum legal age for consensual sex is 16. The penalty for conviction of statutory rape (sex with a child under age 13) is a minimum of 15 years in prison. There is no minimum penalty for conviction of sexual relations with a child between the ages of 14 and 16. Possession of or trade in child pornography is illegal. The government continued to train police officials in handling of child sex abuse cases. Centers for abused women and children worked to reduce the trauma suffered by abused children" (Pg 17).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"The law prohibits discriminatory practices against women married under civil law, but women married under customary law face legal and cultural discrimination" (Pg 15).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"The law defines rape in broad terms and allows for the prosecution of spousal rape. The courts tried numerous cases of rape during the year, and the government generally enforced court sentences providing between five and 45 years’ imprisonment for those convicted. Between January and July, police received reports of 565 rapes. Women’s groups and NGOs believed the actual prevalence of rape was higher, with only a small fraction of cases prosecuted and fewer still resulting in conviction. Factors hampering rape prosecutions included limited police capacity and the withdrawal of allegations by alleged victims after the filing of charges. Many rape cases are heard by traditional authorities rather than in...more
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-1, AOM-LAW-1

"The law prohibits civil marriages before age 18 for both boys and girls. The Child Care and Protection Act prohibits customary marriage before age 18, but it did occur" (Pg 16).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: GP-DATA-5

"There were 15 Gender-based Violence Protection Units (formerly called women and child protection units) staffed with police officers, social workers, legal advisors, and medical personnel trained to assist victims of sexual assault. The Ministries of Justice, Health and Social Services, and Gender Equality and Child Welfare, along with NGOs, provided training to some members of these units. Some magistrate courts provided special courtrooms with a cubicle constructed of one-way glass and child-friendly waiting rooms to protect vulnerable witnesses from open testimony. A privately run shelter for victims of GBV violence in the Khomas region operated effectively. The Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare built shelters in the other regions....more
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-2, DV-LAW-1, DV-LAW-2

"The law prohibits domestic violence, but the problem was widespread. Penalties for conviction of domestic violence, including physical abuse, sexual abuse, economic abuse, intimidation, harassment, and serious emotional, verbal, or psychological abuse, range from a fine of N$300 ($21) for simple offenses to 10 years’ imprisonment and a fine for assault with intent to cause grievous bodily harm. No official information was available on enforcement of the antidomestic violence law except as it involved rape. The law provides for the issuance of protection orders in cases of domestic violence and specifies that certain crimes of violence-- including murder, rape, and assault--be handled differently if the crimes take place within a...more
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2, DACH-DATA-2, CWC-DATA-2, MMR-DATA-1

"Couples and individuals have the right to decide the number, spacing, and timing of their children; manage their reproductive health; and have access to the information and means to do so, free from discrimination, coercion, or violence. There are no government restrictions on the provision of contraceptives except to children under age 14, the legal age of consent for medical treatment, and 50 percent of women used a modern contraceptive method. Women who lived in urban areas had better access to skilled attendance during childbirth and postpartum care than those in rural areas. The country’s 2014 Demographic and Health Survey reported the 2013 maternal mortality ratio was 385 per 100,000...more
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The government and media focused national attention on gender-based violence (GBV). Police reported 39 GBV cases resulting in death between January and August. The current and previous presidents spoke publicly against GBV" (Pg 13).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: LO-LAW-1

"The law prohibits gender-based discrimination, including employment discrimination. Women nonetheless experienced discrimination in such areas as obtaining credit, salary level, owning and managing businesses, education, and housing (see section 7.d.) (Pg 15).
June 11, 2019, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"The law explicitly prohibits sexual harassment in the workplace. Employees who leave their jobs due to sexual harassment may be entitled to legal “remedies available to an employee who has been unfairly dismissed.” The law against sexual harassment was not frequently enforced, but there were few public complaints about lack of enforcement" (Pg 14). "Discrimination in employment and occupation occurred with respect to gender (see section 6) and race, most frequently in the mining and construction industries. Men continued to dominate positions of upper management in both the private and public sectors" (Pg 23).
May 20, 2019, 2:23 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: IIP-LAW-2, AFE-PRACTICE-1

There is legislation on sexual harassment in education in Namibia (117).