The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Nepal

Feb. 8, 2019, 3:28 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Morocco, Nepal
Variables: CLCC-LAW-2

"Unmarried parents must overcome significant hurdles where the system does not recognize children born outside marriage—as is the case in Bahrain and Nepal—or requires additional procedures for registering their birth, as in Iraq, Jordan and Morocco, where an unmarried parent must obtain a court order to register their child" (p. 29).
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:41 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"29.6% of seats in the lower/single house of Nepal (176 out of 595 total seats) are held by women"
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"3.7% of ministerial positions in Nepal (1 out of 27 total positions) are held by women"
Feb. 1, 2019, 8:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1

"A 67-year-old woman was beaten black and blue and forced to eat human waste by four persons including a Nepal Army personnel in Siddha Lek Rural Municipality in Dhading. Following the incident, a team of police from District Police Office, Dhading arrested Harka Bahadur Pulami (45), Khol Bahadur Pulami (63), Tham Bahadur Magar (55) and NA personnel Dhan Bahadur Magar" (para 1-2). "According to victim’s kin, Magar who had returned home from army barrack to celebrate Tihar festival cited chest pain and accused the elderly women of practicing witchcraft to inflict pain before calling over three local shamans to execute a-heinous-act. Main accused, Magar who is said to have orchestrated...more
Jan. 31, 2019, 7:34 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"Following the incident, the government is planning to send officials to the area again to educate residents about the practice, he said. The practice was banned by the Supreme Court in 2005 and a new law criminalized it last year, with violators who force women into exile during menstruation facing up to three months in prison or a fine of 3,000 Nepalese rupees (£23)" (para 14-15).
Jan. 31, 2019, 7:34 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-PRACTICE-1

"A woman and her two sons died in a freezing hut in a remote Nepalese village after the mother was exiled during her period" (para 1). "The mother was forced into the hut during her period under the Hindu custom of Chhaupadi which deems women to be 'impure,' for its duration" (para 4). "Many menstruating women are still forced to leave their homes and take shelter in unhygienic or insecure huts or cow sheds until their cycle ends. During their period women are not allowed to enter the temple, use kitchen utensils or wash in communal areas, SBS reported. The custom continues in many parts of the majority Hindu Himalayan...more
Jan. 31, 2019, 7:34 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-DATA-1

"Many menstruating women are still forced to leave their homes and take shelter in unhygienic or insecure huts or cow sheds until their cycle ends. During their period women are not allowed to enter the temple, use kitchen utensils or wash in communal areas, SBS reported" (para 16-17).
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Bangladesh, Benin, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cape Verde, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Moldova, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nepal, North Korea, Oman, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Korea, South Sudan, Sudan, Thailand, Ukraine, United States, Yemen
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-4

1.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Bangladesh, Burma/Myanmar, Chile, Costa Rica, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, North Korea, Oman, Paraguay, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, South Sudan, Sudan, Thailand, Turkmenistan, Vanuatu
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-2

1.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: MURDER-DATA-4

According to calculations based on the WHO Homicide Estimates for 2015, the homicide rate for females aged 15-44 is 1.99 per 100,000 female population ages 15-44.
Jan. 18, 2019, 10:43 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1

"Dalit woman assaulted, publically humiliated and forced to eat human excreta. The Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) has received information concerning the case of a Dalit woman who was assaulted, publically humiliated and forced to eat her own excreta by the villagers. It is reported that Mrs. Kalli Kumari was accused of practising witchcraft by the villagers, who confined Kumari in a room for two days, tortured and forced her to confess that she practiced witchcraft" (Slide 18).
Jan. 16, 2019, 8:21 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SUICIDE-DATA-1

According to Countryeconomy.com, the total suicide rate for women in Nepal in 2015 was 5.5 per 100,000 total female population (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 10, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3

"Lighting someone on fire is another form of violence most often directed at women in Nepal, says Pratiksha Giri, executive director of BVS-Nepal, the organization supporting acid and burn survivors" (para 14). "The criminal case involving Sangita Magar previously spurred the government to specifically criminalize acid and burn violence in 2015. Before that, cases could only be tried as an equivalent to battery, with punishments as low as two months in jail or a fine of about $10, or as attempted murder, which can be harder to prove and does not come with compensation, says Sabin Shrestha, executive director of the Forum for Women, Law and Development" (para 16).more
Jan. 10, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"Burn Violence Survivors (BVS-Nepal), a Kathmandu-based organization that helps survivors of acid and burn violence" (para 8) A majority of burn victims are women (AMG-CODER COMMENT). "'The underlying problem is the fundamental devaluation of women and girls,' says Jessica Neuwirth, director of Donor Direct Action, a global women's rights organization that supported Sangita Magar's legal team" (para 13). "The criminal case involving Sangita Magar previously spurred the government to specifically criminalize acid and burn violence in 2015. Before that, cases could only be tried as an equivalent to battery, with punishments as low as two months in jail or a fine of about $10, or as attempted murder, which can...more
Jan. 10, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"In 2014, Rihanna Dhapali's husband and mother-in-law set her on fire over a dowry dispute, then kept her home for days without treatment; she was seven months pregnant at the time and lost the baby. Dhapali was Sangita Magar's co-plaintiff in the public interest lawsuit that reached Nepal's Supreme Court and triggered the change in the law" (para 15).
Jan. 10, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-2

Three years ago early on a February morning, 16-year-old Sangita Magar had just arrived at a prep class for her high school exams in Kathmandu. Her friend Seema Basnet was asking Magar for help with an accounting problem when the door flung open and someone threw liquid in Magar's face, splashing Basnet too. Magar later learned that her attacker, Jiwan B.K., was a tenant in the apartment building where she lived with her family. According to Magar, B.K. had gotten into a fight with her brother about the shared bathroom in the building and took it out on Magar by attacking her with acid (para 1-2).
Jan. 10, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: MURDER-LAW-1

"The criminal case involving Sangita Magar previously spurred the government to specifically criminalize acid and burn violence in 2015. Before that, cases could only be tried as an equivalent to battery, with punishments as low as two months in jail or a fine of about $10, or as attempted murder, which can be harder to prove and does not come with compensation, says Sabin Shrestha, executive director of the Forum for Women, Law and Development, who tried the public interest case alongside BVS-Nepal. The new law strengthened the punishment for perpetrators who will now be subject to prison terms of five to eight years and fines of 100,000 to 500,000...more
Jan. 10, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"In June 2017, Magar was one of two plaintiffs in a public interest case that challenged Nepal's laws on acid and burn violence. As a result, the Supreme Court ordered that victims should get immediate financial support from the government to cover treatment. This change came into effect on Aug. 17 as part of a new civil and criminal code, intended to modernize the legal system. The new code also strengthened other laws related to gender-based violence, including longer jail sentences for rape and criminalizing the practice of secluding menstruating women outside the home" (para 7).
Jan. 10, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The underlying problem is the fundamental devaluation of women and girls," says Jessica Neuwirth, director of Donor Direct Action, a global women's rights organization that supported Sangita Magar's legal team" (para 13).
Jan. 10, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: LRW-LAW-1, LRW-LAW-2, SMPP-LAW-1

"The new code also strengthened other laws related to gender-based violence, including longer jail sentences for rape and criminalizing the practice of secluding menstruating women outside the home" (para 7).
Jan. 10, 2019, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"The criminal case involving Sangita Magar previously spurred the government to specifically criminalize acid and burn violence in 2015. Before that, cases could only be tried as an equivalent to battery, with punishments as low as two months in jail or a fine of about $10, or as attempted murder, which can be harder to prove and does not come with compensation, says Sabin Shrestha, executive director of the Forum for Women, Law and Development, who tried the public interest case alongside BVS-Nepal. The new law strengthened the punishment for perpetrators who will now be subject to prison terms of five to eight years and fines of 100,000 to 500,000...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: VOTE-PRACTICE-1

"The western parts of Nepal are characterized by high illiteracy and poverty, low development and significant gender inequality" (para 8).
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"Many communities in Nepal view menstruation as 'impure,' deeming women 'untouchable' when they have their period. As a result, families force women and girls to sleep in huts away from their homes when they menstruate, a custom known as chhaupadi. Women and girls are not only banished from the home, but are also barred from touching food, religious icons, cattle and men" (para 2-3)."She explained that the law failed to take into account the nuances of chhaupadi in different parts of Nepal and failed to address all the 45 restrictions that come with the practice, which include a ban on bathing and restrictions to women’s diets, they are only allowed...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The western parts of Nepal are characterized by high illiteracy and poverty, low development and significant gender inequality. A 2010 government study found that one-fifth of Nepali women practiced chhaupadi but in the mid- and far-west the figure was significantly higher" (para 8).
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-3

“The forced isolation and forced stigmatization of women [to believe] they are impure and have to go away from their homes has created not only psychological fear for women but also for their children,' says Mohna Ansari, a member of the National Human Rights Commission of Nepal who was part of the campaign to ban the practice" (para 10). "Radha Paudel, Action Works Nepal’s founder and a menstrual rights activist, said there was more work to do to make sure the law covers all discriminatory practices" (para 18).
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Activists are also concerned that the law will not be enough to change people’s deep-rooted beliefs. Why, they ask, would a law override a practice that is written in Hindu scriptures? 'Smashing deep-rooted stigma and taboos is not an easy task,' said Pragya Lamsal, a women’s rights activist and development worker based in Nepal’s capital, Kathmandu. I think the government needs to mobilize local leaders, teachers, priests [and] civil society members in awareness campaigns, because locals who are practicing the tradition are the core agents of change" (para 22-24).
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: SMPP-LAW-1

"Nepal’s Parliament has criminalized the practice of banishing women and girls from their homes during menstruation and after childbirth" (para 1) "The new law, which will come into effect next year, carries a three-month jail sentence, a fine of 3,000 rupees (about $40) or both, for anyone who forces a woman to follow the practice. 'A woman during her menstruation or post-natal state should not be kept in chhaupadi or treated with any kind of similar discrimination or untouchable and inhuman behavior,' reads the law, which was passed in a unanimous vote on Wednesday" (para 5-6).
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-1, MMR-PRACTICE-1

"The United Nations has found the custom makes women and girls more susceptible to diarrhea, pneumonia and respiratory diseases. They are more vulnerable to rape and abuse when isolated in sheds, and there is an increased risk of infant and maternal death when mother and baby are banished to a shed after birth" (para 16).
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Many communities in Nepal view menstruation as 'impure,' deeming women 'untouchable' when they have their period. As a result, families force women and girls to sleep in huts away from their homes when they menstruate, a custom known as chhaupadi" (para 2).
Jan. 8, 2019, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Many communities in Nepal view menstruation as 'impure,' deeming women 'untouchable' when they have their period. As a result, families force women and girls to sleep in huts away from their homes when they menstruate, a custom known as chhaupadi. Women and girls are not only banished from the home, but are also barred from touching food, religious icons, cattle and men" (para 2-3).