The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Niger

June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: LRCM-PRACTICE-1, LRCM-LAW-2

"The law does not explicitly recognize spousal rape, and authorities seldom prosecuted it. Victims often sought to deal with the rape within the family or were pressured to do so, and many victims did not report spousal rape due to fear of retribution or loss of economic support" (Pg 16).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The constitution and law prohibit discrimination based on race, gender, religion, political opinion, national origin or citizenship, social origin, disability, age, language, HIV-positive status or other communicable disease, or social status" (Pg 15). "Although the constitution provides for equal legal status and rights regardless of gender, women do not have the same rights as men under family law, which customary courts usually adjudicate. In customary law legal rights as head of household typically apply only to men. Customary law does not consider a divorced or widowed woman, even with children, to be a head of household. Traditional and religious beliefs resulted in discrimination in education, employment (see section 7.d.), owning...more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Prison officials held female inmates in separate quarters that were less crowded and relatively cleaner than men’s quarters" (Pg 2).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, PW-PRACTICE-3

"The practice continued of taking a 'fifth wife,' or 'wahaya,' in which girls and women are sold into physical or sexual slavery. Polygamy is legal and widespread" (Pg 17).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Although the constitution provides for equal legal status and rights regardless of gender, women do not have the same rights as men under family law, which customary courts usually adjudicate. In customary law legal rights as head of household typically apply only to men. Customary law does not consider a divorced or widowed woman, even with children, to be a head of household. Traditional and religious beliefs resulted in discrimination in education, employment (see section 7.d.), owning or managing a business, credit, and property rights. Discrimination was worse in rural areas, where women helped with subsistence farming and did most of the childrearing, cooking, water- and wood-gathering, and other work....more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-1, AOM-PRACTICE-1, AOM-LAW-1, AOM-DATA-2, MABFC-DATA-1

"The law allows a girl deemed to be “sufficiently mature” to marry at 15. Some families entered into marriage agreements under which rural girls 12 or even younger were sent to their husband’s families to be under the “supervision” of their mothers-in-law. According to UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA), 28 percent of women ages 20-24 married before age 15 and 76 percent married before age 18. According to the 2012 DHS, 36 percent of women 20-24 years old were first married or in union before they were 15 years old. Prevalence of child marriage was highest in the south, in the Diffa, Zinder, Maradi, and Tahoua regions. The Ministry...more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"There were eight female ministers in the 36-member cabinet (22 percent). Women held 16 of 113 National Assembly seats (14 percent)" (Pg 13).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-1

"There were eight female ministers in the 36-member cabinet (22 percent). Women held 16 of 113 National Assembly seats (14 percent)" (Pg 13). This is one percentage point below the quota mandated by law meaning that there is something ineffective about the quota (EJ - Coder Comment).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: CWC-DATA-2, LO-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, IAD-LAW-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Although the constitution provides for equal legal status and rights regardless of gender, women do not have the same rights as men under family law, which customary courts usually adjudicate. In customary law legal rights as head of household typically apply only to men. Customary law does not consider a divorced or widowed woman, even with children, to be a head of household. Traditional and religious beliefs resulted in discrimination in education, employment (see section 7.d.), owning or managing a business, credit, and property rights. Discrimination was worse in rural areas, where women helped with subsistence farming and did most of the childrearing, cooking, water- and wood-gathering, and other work....more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: DACH-DATA-1, DACH-DATA-2, CRPLB-PRACTICE-1, MMR-PRACTICE-1, MMR-DATA-1

"The government provides free health care for children up to five years of age, leading to increased access to health centers for women’s general and essential obstetric and postpartum care, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Due to a shortage of skilled health professionals and limited resources, many women used traditional midwives during childbirth and were referred to hospitals only when the mother or child suffered health complications. According to the 2012 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), 30 percent of births took place in health centers, and skilled personnel attended 29 percent of births. The maternal mortality ratio (the number of maternal deaths per 100,000 live births) was 630...more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: GP-DATA-3, GP-DATA-4

"On National Women’s Day, the government renewed its commitment to combating violence against women by empowering them. The minister of population, women’s promotion, and children’s protection listed the actions initiated by her ministry, including the development of a national women’s leadership program, a national strategy to fight gender-based violence, and capacity-building efforts. The ministry’s strategic plan for 2012-15 includes infrastructure building, provision of tools and equipment for women, and the insertion of gender in the local development plans of 39 communes and in the training curricula of various vocational schools" (Pg 16-17).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2, IIP-LAW-2

"Sexual harassment is a crime punishable by prison sentences of three to six months and fines of 10,000 to 100,000 CFA francs ($17 to $173). If the violator is in a position of authority over the victim, the prison sentence is three months to one year and the fine is increased to 20,000 to 200,000 CFA francs ($35 to $347). Sexual harassment was common. Courts enforced applicable laws in the small percentage of cases reported" (Pg 17).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Domestic violence against women was reportedly widespread, although reliable statistics were not available regarding numbers of incidents, prosecutions, or convictions. Husbands commonly beat their wives. While the law does not explicitly prohibit domestic violence, a woman may sue her husband or lodge criminal charges for battery, penalties for which range from two months in prison and a fine of 10,000 CFA francs ($17) to 30 years’ imprisonment. The government tried with limited success to enforce these laws, and courts prosecuted cases of domestic violence when they received complaints. Charges stemming from family disputes often were dropped in favor of traditional dispute resolution mechanisms. While women have the right to seek...more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-2, DV-LAW-1, DV-LAW-2

"While the law does not explicitly prohibit domestic violence, a woman may sue her husband or lodge criminal charges for battery, penalties for which range from two months in prison and a fine of 10,000 CFA francs ($17) to 30 years’ imprisonment. The government tried with limited success to enforce these laws, and courts prosecuted cases of domestic violence when they received complaints. Charges stemming from family disputes often were dropped in favor of traditional dispute resolution mechanisms. While women have the right to seek redress for violence in the customary or formal courts, few did so due to ignorance of redress offered by the legal system and fear of...more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"Six years of elementary education are compulsory, tuition free, and universal from the age of six. Students often had to buy their own books and supplies. In September the government provided each secondary school and primary school student with a kit comprising notebooks and other supplies. According to the National Institute of Statistics, in 2012 the primary school completion rate for children in school was 71 percent for girls and 88 percent for boys. Many parents kept young girls at home to work, and girls rarely attended school for more than a few years" (Pg 19).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

"The labor code prohibits discrimination in employment and occupation based on race, color, sex, religion, political opinion, national origin or citizenship, social origin, disability, sexual orientation and/or gender identity, age, language, HIV-positive status, sickle cells disease, or other communicable disease. The code prescribes increased penalties for persons engaging in discrimination and explicitly prohibits certain forms of sexual harassment. The code requires equal pay for equal work and provides benefits for persons with disabilities and the adaptation of jobs and conditions of employment. The government, in general, did not effectively enforce the law. The government neither adopted any regulations to implement the labor code nor took any actions to prevent employment...more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Although the constitution provides for equal legal status and rights regardless of gender, women do not have the same rights as men under family law, which customary courts usually adjudicate. In customary law legal rights as head of household typically apply only to men. Customary law does not consider a divorced or widowed woman, even with children, to be a head of household. Traditional and religious beliefs resulted in discrimination in education, employment (see section 7.d.), owning or managing a business, credit, and property rights. Discrimination was worse in rural areas, where women helped with subsistence farming and did most of the childrearing, cooking, water- and wood-gathering, and other work....more
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, LRW-PRACTICE-2, LRW-LAW-1, LRW-LAW-2, LRW-DATA-1

"Rape was a widespread problem. It is punishable by 10 to 30 years in prison, depending on the circumstances and age of the victim. Most rape cases went unreported due to victims’ fear or shame. According to the prime minister, surveys in 2010 on gender-based violence showed that at some point in their lives 43.2 percent of women nationwide had experienced physical violence, and 28.3 percent experienced sexual violence" (Pg 16).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: LBHO-LAW-2

"The law mandates that women fill at least 30 percent of senior government positions and at least 15 percent of elected seats" (Pg 13).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"The government recognized the basic right of couples and individuals to decide freely and responsibly the number, spacing, and timing of their children and to manage their reproductive health; however, information regarding reproductive rights was not readily available. There were no restrictions on the right of access to contraception, skilled health attendance during pregnancy and childbirth, and emergency health care. Under the guidance of the Ministry of Public Health, clinics and local NGOs could disseminate information on family planning freely" (Pg 18).
June 12, 2019, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1, INFIB-LAW-1, INFIB-DATA-1, INFIB-DATA-2

"The law prohibits FGM/C, which is punishable by six months to three years in prison. If an FGM/C victim dies, the practitioner may be sentenced to 10 to 20 years in prison. There were no reports of FGM/C perpetrated on women age 18 and over. FGM/C was practiced on young girls, with clitoridectomy the most common form. Dangouria, a form of FGM/C found only in Niger, was also common. It consists of cutting away the hymen of newborn girls by traditional barbers known as wanzam. Certain ethnic groups practiced FGM/C, predominantly the Peuhl and Djerma in the west. According to the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the FGM/C rate nationwide decreased...more
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: MULV-LAW-1

The government of Niger does not provide for valuation of nonmonetary contributions, such as staying at home to take care of children or other dependents (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: GIC-LAW-1

There is paid maternity leave available to women in Niger of at least 14 weeks. Women receive at least 2/3 of their wages for the duration of their maternity leave. The government pays for 50% of maternity leave benefits. There is a difference of 0.51 between leave reserved for men and women relative to leave reserved for women as a function of who pays. There is no paid parental leave. Mothers are guaranteed an equivalent position after returning to work from maternity leave. The government supports or provides childcare services. Childcare payments are not tax deductible (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: ATFPA-LAW-1

In Niger, there is legislation designating head of household status (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Niger can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

Primary education in Niger is free and compulsory (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: GP-DATA-5

Niger law does not establish an anti-discrimination commission (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-4

Women are not able to work in the same industries as men in Niger (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

A woman in Niger cannit legally choose where she lives in the same way as a man (120).
May 17, 2019, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: IIP-LAW-2, AFE-PRACTICE-1

There is not legislation on sexual harassment in education in Niger (120).