The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Nigeria

Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Belize, Benin, Botswana, Brunei, Central African Rep, Comoros, D R Congo, Gambia, Haiti, Iran, Japan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Maldives, Mali, Nigeria, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Vanuatu, Yemen
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

3.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Rep, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Montenegro, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

1.0more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Trafficking in Persons Law Enforcement and Administration Act, as amended in 2015, criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking and prescribed a minimum penalty of two years’ imprisonment and a fine of 250,000 naira ($693) for both sex and labor trafficking; the minimum penalty for sex trafficking increased to seven years’ imprisonment and a fine of 1 million naira ($2,770) if the case involved a child victim. These penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with regard to sex trafficking, commensurate with those prescribed for other serious crimes, such as kidnapping. In May 2018, the Edo State government approved a state-level anti-trafficking law that criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking and prescribed...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The anti-trafficking law prohibited the penalization of trafficking victims for unlawful acts committed as a result of being subjected to trafficking, including by armed groups. However, multiple credible international organizations reported the government continued to arrest and in some cases detain for prolonged periods, reportedly for screening and perceived intelligence value, women and children removed from or allegedly associated with Boko Haram and ISIS-WA, including women and girls who had been forcibly married to or sexually enslaved by the insurgents; authorities did not consistently screen for trafficking" (363). "The government did not have a formal policy to prevent the removal of victims to countries where they would face hardship or...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Nigeria, and traffickers exploit victims from Nigeria abroad. Nigerian trafficking victims are recruited from rural areas—especially the country’s southern regions—and, to a lesser extent, urban areas. Women and girls are victims of domestic servitude and sex trafficking (...) Traffickers operate 'baby factories'—often disguised as orphanages, maternity homes, or religious centers—where traffickers hold women against their will, rape them, and force them to carry and deliver a child. The traffickers sell the children, sometimes with the intent to exploit them in forced labor and sex trafficking (...) Women from West African countries transit Nigeria en route...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Nigeria does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Nigeria was upgraded to Tier 2. These efforts included supporting implementation of a 2017 action plan between Civilian Joint Task Force (CJTF), a governmentsupported non-governmental armed group, and an international organization to end its recruitment and use of child soldiers. There were no verified cases of any Nigerian government-supported entity recruiting or using child soldiers during the reporting period. The government convicted significantly more traffickers than the previous reporting period and initiated prosecutions...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"NAPTIP identified 126 forced labor victims and 1,028 potential victims. This was a decrease compared to 188 forced labor victims and 1,121 potential trafficking victims identified in the previous reporting period" (363).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
Sept. 20, 2019, 7:39 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, GEW-PRACTICE-1

"Boko Haram routinely forces girls to choose between forced marriages to its fighters—for the purpose of sexual slavery—or becoming suicide bombers" (366).
Sept. 20, 2019, 7:38 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CWC-DATA-3

"As in past years, reports continue to indicate government officials and security forces commit widespread sexual exploitation—including sex trafficking—and such exploitation is a major concern across the Northeast, including in informal IDP camps and all of the 13 formal, state-run IDP camps in and around Maiduguri, the Borno State capital, which hosts IDPs affected by the ongoing conflict with Boko Haram and ISISWA. 'Gatekeepers' in control of some IDP camps, at times in collusion with Nigerian policemen and soldiers, reportedly force women and girls to provide sex acts in exchange for food and services in the camps. In July 2016, a Nigerian research organization surveyed 400 IDPs in Adamawa, Borno,...more
July 24, 2019, 6:31 p.m.
Countries: Cameroon, Central African Rep, Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"Chadian children were also found in forced cattle herding in Cameroon, the CAR, and Nigeria" (page 22).
July 20, 2019, 7:51 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: POLY-LAW-1

"In a polygamous family, however, the eldest son distributes the property per stripe at his discretion. In Enugu, Ezeike and Etteh clans of Igbo-Eze Division, the eldest son is the sole heir. In Ogbaru Division, the eldest son inherits the property exclusively though in practice, he sometimes shares the property out with his other brothers" (168). "In Afikpo and Edda clan of Afikpo Division, the male children in a polygamous family or the eldest child in a monogamous family will share the yams with the maternal brothers of the deceased. Other farm produce are inherited by the nearest maternal sisters e.g. sisters of the same mothers daughters of the sisters...more
July 20, 2019, 7:37 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, POLY-LAW-1

""It is generally true that widows are denied inheritance to housing and land in particular, and to chattels to a lesser degree. Generally, inheritance is based on the principle of primogeniture: that is, that the eldest surviving son inherits all the deceased’s property...In northern Nigeria, which is predominantly Muslim, women’s inheritance is governed by Islamic law — the Sharia. Under the Sharia, women can acquire and retain their own property, can pass it on to their heirs, and can inherit from their deceased parents, husbands, brothers, sisters, daughters and other relations. However, under the personal law code of the Sharia, the share of inheritance a female receives is discriminatory. Male...more
July 20, 2019, 7:27 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Almost all ethnic groups practice patrilineal inheritance. Upon a man's death, land may be divided among his male heirs or passed down solely to the eldest son, depending on the community practice. If a man has multiple wives, his land is divided equally among the wives and passed down to their sons. Women rarely inherit land, usually only if there are no male heirs. Inheritance is by far the most common mode of land acquisition among rural people" (para 1)
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"On May 25, the government enacted the Violence Against Persons Prohibition (VAPP) Act. It addresses sexual violence, physical violence, psychological violence, harmful traditional practices, and socioeconomic violence. Under the VAPP, spousal battery, forceful ejection from home, forced financial dependence or economic abuse, harmful widowhood practices, female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C), harmful traditional practices, substance attacks (such as acid attacks), political violence, and violence by state actors (especially government security forces) are offenses. Victims and survivors of violence are entitled to comprehensive medical, psychological, social, and legal assistance by accredited service providers and government agencies, with their identities protected during court cases. The act makes the National Agency for the Prohibition of...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"The practice of demanding sexual favors in exchange for employment or university grades remained common" (Pg 35). "Although the constitution provides the same legal status and rights for women as for men, women experienced considerable economic discrimination. The law does not mandate equal remuneration for work of equal value, and the law does not mandate nondiscrimination based on gender in hiring. No laws bar women from particular fields of employment, but women reportedly could not work in heavy manufacturing and construction in the same way as men. Women often experienced discrimination under traditional and religious practices (see section 7.d.)" (Pg 35). "Gender-based discrimination in employment and occupation occurred (see section...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1, AOM-LAW-1, AOM-DATA-2

"The law sets a minimum age of 18 years for marriage for both boys and girls. According to the 2013 NDHS, 43 percent of women between ages 20 and 24 reported being married or in a union before age 18, and 17 percent reported being married or in a union before age 15. Fewer than half the country’s state assemblies adopted the Child Rights Act of 2003, which sets the minimum marriage age, and most states, especially northern states, did not uphold the federal official minimum age for marriage. The government engaged religious leaders, emirs, and sultans on the problem, pointing out the health hazards and improving their awareness of...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2, IIP-LAW-2

"Sexual harassment remained a common problem. No statutes prohibit sexual harassment, but authorities may prosecute violent harassment under assault statutes. The VAPP criminalizes stalking, with terms of imprisonment of up to two years, a maximum fine of 500,000 naira ($2,500), or both. It does not explicitly criminalize sexual harassment, which it legally defines as physical, verbal, or nonverbal conduct of a sexual nature, based on sex or gender, which is persistent or serious and demeans, humiliates, or creates a hostile or intimidating environment. The act criminalizes emotional, verbal, and psychological abuse and acts of intimidation" (Pg 34-35).
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"Gender-based discrimination in employment and occupation occurred (see section 6, Women). No laws bar women from particular fields of employment, but women often experienced discrimination under traditional and religious practices. The Nigeria Police Regulations provide for special recruitment requirements and conditions of service applying to women, particularly the criteria and provisions relating to pregnancy and marital status. NGOs expressed concern over continued discrimination against women in the private sector, particularly in access to employment, promotion to higher professional positions, and salary equity. According to credible reports, many businesses implemented a “get pregnant, get fired” policy. Women remained underrepresented in the formal sector but played active and vital roles in the...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Domestic violence remained widespread, and many considered it socially acceptable. CLEEN Foundation’s National Crime Victimization and Safety Survey for 2013 reported that 30 percent of male and female respondents countrywide claimed to have been victims of domestic violence" (Pg 33).
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"In the National Assembly inaugurated on June 9, men encumbered more than 94 percent of seats. Twenty of the 360 members of the House of Representatives and eight of the 109 senators were women. Six of the 36 cabinet members who took office in mid-November were women" (Pg 28). "In the House of Representatives, the percentage of female representatives fell from 5 percent to 4 percent. There were 1,772 House of Representatives candidates, 270 of whom were female (15 percent). The political parties with the highest number of candidates were the APC--358; PDP--360; APGA--88; and LP--187. Of these, there were 27 APC female candidates (7.5 percent), 19 PDP (5.3 percent),...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The constitution and law prohibit discrimination based on community, place of origin, ethnic group, sex, religion, or political opinion, but the government did not enforce the law effectively. The constitution prohibits discrimination based on the circumstances of a person’s birth" (Pg 31).
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DV-LAW-2

"No laws of nationwide applicability criminalize gender-based violence. The VAPP provides for up to three years’ imprisonment, a maximum fine of 200,000 naira ($1,000), or both for spousal battery. It defines spousal/partner battery as the intentional use of force or violence upon a person to include touching, beating, or striking with the intention of causing bodily harm. The act provides up to one year’s imprisonment for anyone found guilty of intimidation by conveying a threat that induces fear, anxiety, or discomfort. It also authorizes courts to issue protection orders upon application by a victim and directs NAPTIP to appoint a coordinator for the prevention of domestic violence to submit an...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"According to the 2010 Nigeria Education Data Survey, the most recent information available, attendance rates in primary schools ranged from 35 to 80 percent. The lowest attendance rates were in the Northeast (43 percent for boys and 38 percent for girls) and the Northwest, where rates for boys and girls hovered around 47 percent and 35 percent, respectively. Overall 63 percent of boys and 58 percent of girls attended school. According to UNICEF, for every 10 girls in school, more than 22 boys attended. Approximately 25 percent of young persons between ages 17 and 25 had fewer than two years of education. Boko Haram attacks prevented thousands of children from...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-3, LBHO-LAW-1, VOTE-PRACTICE-1, VOTE-LAW-1

"No laws prevent women or minority members from voting, running for office, or serving as electoral monitors, but cultural and traditional practices inhibited women’s ability to do so" (Pg 27-28).
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1, INFIB-DATA-2

"According to a 2008 World Health Organization study, 29.6 percent of girls and women ages 15 to 49 had undergone FGM/C, and the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) reported in 2013 that 14 percent of girls from newborn to age 14 had undergone FGM/C. The age at which women and girls were subjected to the practice varied from the first week of life until after a woman delivered her first child. Most victims were subjected to FGM/C before their first birthday. The highest prevalence among adult women was in the South (77 percent), followed by the Southeast (68 percent) and Southwest (65 percent), and was practiced on a smaller scale in...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2, CWC-DATA-2, CRPLB-PRACTICE-1, MMR-DATA-1

"Couples and individuals generally had the right to decide the number, spacing, and timing of children, but information on reproductive health and access to quality reproductive health services and emergency obstetric care was not widely available. The 2013 NDHS reported the maternal mortality rate was 576 deaths per 100,000 live births, due to such factors as lack of access to antenatal care, skilled birth attendants, emergency obstetric care, and other medical services. According to 2013 estimates by the UN, World Health Organization, and World Bank, there were approximately 40,000 maternal deaths in 2013, and a woman’s lifetime risk of maternal death was one in 31. Skilled health-care personnel attended a...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"Domestic violence remained widespread, and many considered it socially acceptable. CLEEN Foundation’s National Crime Victimization and Safety Survey for 2013 reported that 30 percent of male and female respondents countrywide claimed to have been victims of domestic violence. Police often refused to intervene in domestic disputes or blamed the victim for provoking the abuse. In rural areas courts and police were reluctant to intervene to protect women who formally accused their husbands of abuse if the level of alleged abuse did not exceed local customary norms. In 2014 NGOs highlighted the death sentence handed down to Akolade Arowolo, a man who stabbed his wife to death in Lagos in 2011...more
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, LO-LAW-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1

"Women generally remained marginalized. No laws prohibit women from owning land, but customary land tenure systems allowed only men to own land, with women gaining access to land only via marriage or family. Many customary practices also did not recognize a woman’s right to inherit her husband’s property, and many widows became destitute when their in-laws took virtually all the deceased husband’s property" (Pg 36).
June 14, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Large-scale abductions by the group continued. According to nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), between November 2014 and February, Boko Haram abducted more than 500 women and 1,000 children from one local government area in Borno State alone. The group subjected many abducted women and girls to sexual and gender-based violence, including forced marriages and rape" (Pg 2). "Women and girls abducted by Boko Haram were subjected to physical and psychological abuse; forced labor; forced marriage; forced religious conversions; forced participation in military operations; and sexual abuse, including rape" (Pg 17).