The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Nigeria

April 8, 2019, 9:07 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: SUICIDE-PRACTICE-1

“In a populous country like Nigeria with over 180 million people where 60% are female, cases of domestic violence are rampant. Many women and children exposed to violence in Nigeria are also victims of physical and emotional abuse, and are at serious risk of long-term physical and mental health problems. They have also been reported cases of rape, trafficking, kidnapping, and suicide caused by domestic violence” (para 3).
April 8, 2019, 8:58 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: SUICIDE-PRACTICE-1

“The jihadists are sending more children to their death too: the UN has counted 83 used as human bombs this year, four times the total for 2016. Two-thirds of them were girls” (para 2).
April 8, 2019, 8:51 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: SUICIDE-PRACTICE-1

“The evolution of Boko Haram’s bombing campaign also includes the increasing use of children.The group sees them as 'cheap labor,' easily replenished through kidnappings, and has at least twice deployed girls as young as 7 as suicide bombers” (para 11).
April 4, 2019, 7:27 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Colombia, Cote D'Ivoire, Cuba, D R Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Suriname, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Uganda, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-3

4.0
March 21, 2019, 1:45 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Armenia, Bangladesh, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, China, Cyprus, Czech Republic, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji, Gabon, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, India, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Liberia, Libya, Macedonia, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Mongolia, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, Paraguay, Russia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, South Korea, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Ukraine, Uzbekistan
Variables: GP-SCALE-1

3.0
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:41 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"5.6% of seats in the lower/single house of Nigeria (20 out of 360 total seats) are held by women"
Feb. 5, 2019, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"12.0% of ministerial positions in Nigeria (3 out of 25 total positions) are held by women"
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Angola, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Suriname, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Uganda, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-4

2.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:16 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, D R Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Mongolia, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Suriname, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Uganda, Ukraine, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: MURDER-SCALE-2

2.0
Jan. 25, 2019, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MURDER-DATA-4

According to calculations based on the WHO Homicide Estimates for 2015, the homicide rate for females aged 15-44 is 8.70 per 100,000 female population ages 15-44.
Jan. 18, 2019, 10:43 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1

"Child-witches seek refuge. Mary is a pretty five-year-old girl with big brown eyes and a father who kicked her out onto the streets in one of the most dangerous parts of the world. Her crime: the local priest had denounced her as a witch and blamed her 'evil powers' for causing her mother's death. Children from crarn accused of being witches and wizards, protesting outside of the governor's headquarters" (slide 10). Crarn is an organization in Nigeria to protect the rights of children (EJ - Coder Comment).
Jan. 16, 2019, 8:21 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: SUICIDE-DATA-1

According to Countryeconomy.com, the total suicide rate for women in Nigeria in 2015 was 6.13 per 100,000 total female population (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-2

"Men were credited with superior skills in leadership and in people, time and crisis management. This position was supported by essentialist notions of women’s ‘natural’ temperament, as well as by various cultural constructs, the generally low status of women in Nigeria and religious doctrine" (para 9). "The cohort of leaders of the religious fellowships was predominantly male, in spite of the large number of women members. Only two groups had up to 30% female leadership and, even then, these women were in turn subordinate to male leadership. The Amira (female head of the women’s arm of Muslim Students’ Society) vigorously dismissed the possibility of women’s leadership by declaring: 'Astagafulla (God...more
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-2

"Nigerian women still have unequal access to higher education, about 37% of the total UI student body was female at the time of the research presented in this article. Moreover, as the research found, part of the lived experience of being a woman on a Nigerian university campus is being portrayed and treated as subordinate. This subordination is ostensibly due to 'traditional culture,' as well as social and familial factors which view women as inherently fragile, dependent on male protection and requiring surveillance and control" (para 4).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Less than half of UI students live on campus. At the time of this study, only 44.6% of students (30% and 15% of male and female students respectively) were accommodated in the university’s twelve halls of residence" (para 7). "Women students also reported wanting better mentoring by women lecturers and the women’s groups on campus. Some questioned the more conservative agendas of student groups that were preoccupied with producing 'good wives and mothers to build the nation'" (para 20).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"However, we also found evidence of some contestations of the gendered hierarchy in the secular spaces of the university, among hall chairs and female activists. Here, there were remarks that indicate that women can negotiate their relationships with their male friends and academic colleagues. There were also calls for reviews of the university curriculum to include entrepreneurial courses that could make women more employable and thus less dependent on male partners" (para 23).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-2, NGOFW-DATA-1

"Women students occasionally contested male control of the fellowship groups and the sexual double-standard. Those residing in one of the co-ed halls, in a proactive move, joined a non-governmental organisation, War against Rape and Sexual Harassment (WARSH) to fight cases of rape and sexual harassment, and secured the support of male residents" (para 19).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2, WAM-PRACTICE-1

"There were recurring references to transactional sex and allegations that women students preferred ‘sugar daddies,’ echoing a dominant media focus in Nigeria on the alleged 'immorality' of women undergraduates. Given such views, the residential hall authorities blamed gender-based violence on the victims, holding women responsible for their own sexual harassment because of their 'indecent dressing'" (para 18).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-3

"Women’s participation in student politics as potential candidates for elective offices was low and frowned upon, as was women’s activism. A man residing in a mixed hall said that women who engaged in student politics " are probably... those feminists. Those who believe in women’s emancipation. But anybody who is oriented towards getting married, having a family, settling down, definitely, the man will not want it" (para 11). "The reasons given for women’s ostensible apathy were astounding: for example, their 'fragility,' 'lack of courage,' 'inferiority complex,' 'keeping malice,' 'being more controversial.” These traits were opposed to 'men’s boldness,' 'self-confidence,' and 'strong heart.' The resignation of many women to their marginalisation...more
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-2

"Trivialising or labelling of female students was common, for example, in the derisive references to residents of one of the female halls as 'butty', that is, overly westernised, privileged, and not suitable as 'wife material.' In the fellowships, women’s high levels of participation in religious activities were stigmatized as excessive, juvenile, and evidence of their being 'somehow feebleminded, more easily moved than guys.' This participation was viewed as advantageous, though, as a strategy for women to identify suitable partners. A male respondent said: 'There’s a big rush in the husband market. In the fellowships and crusades, you will see the number of sisters who are there to get a husband'"...more
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Trivialising or labelling of female students was common, for example, in the derisive references to residents of one of the female halls as 'butty', that is, overly westernised, privileged, and not suitable as 'wife material'" (para 15).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-2

"Closely related to the relegation of women students to the background was their complaint of being infantilised by female hall wardens, who enforced regulations on visiting periods, 'morality,' dress codes and 'loitering' around the hall by 'ladies.' That male students were subjected to less authoritarian treatment by their male wardens and hall supervisors was resented and seen as sexist" (para 14).
Jan. 9, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Women’s participation in student politics as potential candidates for elective offices was low and frowned upon, as was women’s activism. A man residing in a mixed hall said that women who engaged in student politics' are probably... those feminists. Those who believe in women’s emancipation. But anybody who is oriented towards getting married, having a family, settling down, definitely, the man will not want it. 'The reasons given for women’s ostensible apathy were astounding: for example, their 'fragility,' 'lack of courage,' 'inferiority complex,' 'keeping malice,' 'being more controversial.' These traits were opposed to 'men’s boldness,' 'self-confidence,' and 'strong heart.' The resignation of many women to their marginalisation in university politics...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IW-LAW-1

"'The deceased’s brothers may inherit where the deceased has no children; the wife is not mentioned at all. A widow can’t inherit her deceased husband’s estate and in fact, she is sometimes regarded as part of the estate to be inherited by the deceased brother through heritage marriage,' Justice Onyeabo said" (Para 16). "He said, 'In Sogunro Davies vs Sogunro Davies, it was held that the Yoruba customary practices deprived the wife of any right to inheritance because the devolution of property follows the blood. In fact, in Suberu vs Sumonu, a wife has been described as a chattel to be inherited" (Para 26).
Jan. 8, 2019, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: PW-LAW-1

"She said, 'When a man marries under the customary law, there is a potential that he may marry other wives but even when a man marries under the Marriage Act, some wives have found out that they have to share their husbands with other customary wives or even concubines. Though the marriage is under the Marriage Act, the reality is that some people will show up sometime before death or the man may decide to leave the woman in the dark until death occurs. The reality now is that polygamy is prevalent in our society'" (Para 39).
Jan. 8, 2019, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"Justice Onyeabo said, 'That custom says that only the eldest son inherits all the real properties. The man was very wealthy; no letter of administration was obtained; the other children are saying that the man had migrated from his state to the South-West a long time ago. The children can only remember that they went to the East when they were very young. But only their eldest brother has taken over the estate because the father’s property was shared according to the ethnic custom which says only the first male can inherit all the real properties. The other children are insisting that their father lived all his life in Yorubaland...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

"The judge noted, for example, that in the northern part of Nigeria, the indigenous custom dictates that only the male child can inherit the land either owned by the father or mother. 'The female child cannot inherit except movable belongings owned by her mother,' Justice Onyeabo said. She also noted that among some ethnic groups in Kogi and Edo states, only the male children are recognised as lawful beneficiaries of their fathers’ real property, the female children are not taken into account. Generally in Igboland, she said, the eldest son inherits the entire father’s real assets; while in the Benin culture, only the eldest son inherits the father’s assets, according...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"'Lack of fairness is a common feature of most of the customary law regime. Under most native laws and conducts, there is discrimination against the female,' Justice Onyeabo posited. Corroborating the judge’s view was a lecturer of Private and Property Law at the Faculty of Law, University of Lagos, Dr. Babatunde Oni, who spoke on the same platform and observed that the discrimination against women who marry under the customary law is real" (Para 19-20).
Jan. 8, 2019, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: POLY-LAW-1

"According to her, it is common among the Yorubas that if a man has three wives, his property would be shared into three parts, where each of the wives with her children is regarded as a branch of the family and each of the three branches gets equal share of the deceased property. But this method, she said, predisposes to disharmony, where for instance, there are seven children in a branch and another branch has only one child and each of the branches is entitled to equal share. While the branch with seven children is impoverished, the branch with a single child gets more than enough, the judge observed." (Para...more
Jan. 8, 2019, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

"'By custom, widows subject to customary marriages are not regarded as part of the family; as such, when their husbands die, no matter the level of closeness or contribution to the estate of the deceased’s estates, they are to be excluded. Where there are children, the children inherit. The wife is incapable of inheriting the husband property,' Oni said" (Para 23-24).