The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Nigeria

Jan. 22, 2018, 11:54 a.m.
Countries: Argentina, Nigeria, Sri Lanka, Uruguay
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-1

"The [UN peacekeepers accused of raping women in Haiti and impregnating them] are scattered around the globe, having returned to their homes in Uruguay, Sri Lanka, Nigeria and Argentina" (para 5).
Jan. 20, 2018, 3:58 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-1

"In 2003, Nigeria passed its first law prohibiting human trafficking" (para 21).
Jan. 20, 2018, 3:58 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"By the end of the decade, according to a report commissioned by the United Nations, “the fear of aids rendered drug-addicted Italian girls unattractive on the prostitution market”; Nigerians from Edo State largely filled the demand" (para 18). The Nigerian women were/are being trafficked out as sex workers into European countries, such as Italy due to the increase in demand (AA-CODER COMMENT). "By the mid-nineties, most Edo women who went to Europe in this way “were probably aware that they would have to engage in prostitution to repay their debts,” according to the U.N. report. “They were, however, unaware of the conditions of violent and aggressive exploitation that they would ...more
Jan. 20, 2018, 3:58 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"The men who enter debt bondage come from all over Africa, but the overwhelming majority of females fit a strikingly narrow profile: they are teen-age girls from around Benin City, the capital of Edo State, in southern Nigeria—girls like Blessing" (para 8). "More than eleven thousand Nigerian women were rescued in the Mediterranean last year, according to the International Organization for Migration, eighty per cent of whom had been trafficked for sexual exploitation" (para 84).
Jan. 20, 2018, 3:58 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"The migration of young women out of Benin City began in the nineteen-eighties, when Edo women—fed up with repression, domestic chores, and a lack of economic opportunities—travelled to Europe by airplane, with fake documents. Many ended up doing sex work on the streets of major cities—London, Paris, Madrid, Athens, Rome" (para 18).
Jan. 20, 2018, 3:58 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: IRP-PRACTICE-1

"The U.N. report, published the same year, concluded that the industry was “so ingrained in Edo State, especially in Benin City and its immediate environs, that it is estimated that virtually every Benin family has one member or the other involved.” Today, tens of thousands of Edo women have done sex work in Europe, and some streets in Benin City are named for madams. The city is filled with women and girls who have come back, but some who can’t find work end up making the journey again" (para 21). "Nuns working for an organization called the Committee for the Support and Dignity of Women travel to local schools and ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:44 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia, Nigeria, Philippines
Variables: MULV-PRACTICE-1

"There may not be a way right now to prevent future attacks [in Nigeria militant groups caused an oil spill, increasing time for women complete daily tasks like finding clean water], but as researchers have found in consultations with women in in the Philippines and Ethiopia, state actors could help make communities more resilient in the face of new attacks and subsequent environmental disasters by developing a public support system that, among other things, places greater value on unpaid care work"(para 11)
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Ostensibly, Delta State where these attacks take place has enough oil wealth to invest in an infrastructure that would help make it easier for women like Okolo and Ekiyor to balance their domestic and work responsibilities—including investments in child care, schools and hospitals. In fact, many residents advocate for that kind of spending, and activists have historically demanded that a greater share of the oil wealth be invested back into communities. But this hasn’t happened, although Delta State has a $78.6 million budget for the region’s development. Under-funding, delays in disbursement and corruption have largely affected progress. In addition, in this restive region, the federal government, backed by a $1.3 ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Female farmers, fishers and herbalists of riverine villages relied on fresh water not only for their businesses and livelihoods, but also to perform daily tasks. Take something as simple as doing laundry. Women who previously [before the oil spill caused by militant groups] washed clothes by the river now have to collect rainwater in buckets to do their washing, stretching this task several hours. In other words, instead of spending time doing work that could earn them money or going to school, or participating in a job training program, women now spend the greater part of their day sourcing food, water and tending to sick children and relatives. Water contamination ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"The hit [from an oil spill caused by militant groups] to the country’s economy is significant, as more than than two-thirds of state budget comes from crude exports. But what do these numbers not show? How this disaster has shrunk the time that many women had to do paid work by increasing their unpaid work load. The labor that keeps the women in the Niger Delta busy tends to be care work—looking after children, the elderly, the ill—as well as cooking and cleaning. This is work that technically has a market value, but is done for free inside the home, and therefore traditional productivity measures like GDP don’t capture it. ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"The labor that keeps the women in the Niger Delta busy tends to be care work—looking after children, the elderly, the ill—as well as cooking and cleaning. This is work that technically has a market value, but is done for free inside the home, and therefore traditional productivity measures like GDP don’t capture it. But if we did measure it, McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the total output of unpaid care work would equal about $10 trillion, roughly 13% of global GDP. In Nigeria, women spend on average 8.5 hours/day on unpaid care work, according to ActionAid. And after an environmental disaster, there is even more of it"(para 3)more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"The labor that keeps the women in the Niger Delta busy tends to be care work—looking after children, the elderly, the ill—as well as cooking and cleaning. This is work that technically has a market value, but is done for free inside the home, and therefore traditional productivity measures like GDP don’t capture it. But if we did measure it, McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the total output of unpaid care work would equal about $10 trillion, roughly 13% of global GDP. In Nigeria, women spend on average 8.5 hours/day on unpaid care work, according to ActionAid. And after an environmental disaster, there is even more of it"(para 3)."Ostensibly, Delta ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"The hit [from an oil spill caused by militant groups] to the country’s economy is significant, as more than than two-thirds of state budget comes from crude exports. But what do these numbers not show? How this disaster has shrunk the time that many women had to do paid work by increasing their unpaid work load. The labor that keeps the women in the Niger Delta busy tends to be care work—looking after children, the elderly, the ill—as well as cooking and cleaning. This is work that technically has a market value, but is done for free inside the home, and therefore traditional productivity measures like GDP don’t capture it. ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

"Female farmers, fishers and herbalists of riverine villages relied on fresh water not only for their businesses and livelihoods, but also to perform daily tasks. Take something as simple as doing laundry. Women who previously [before the militant groups caused an oil spil] washed clothes by the river now have to collect rainwater in buckets to do their washing, stretching this task several hours. In other words, instead of spending time doing work that could earn them money or going to school, or participating in a job training program, women now spend the greater part of their day sourcing food, water and tending to sick children and relatives. Water contamination ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: GIC-LAW-3

"And the impacts [from the oil spill caused by militant groups] on families are dire: Sarah Okolo is doubtful she can raise the startup money for her food stall. On average it takes her twenty minutes to walk to the market, but Okolo worries that her working day would mean her two small children would have to be on their own for too long, and she does not have an arrangement for somebody to watch them for the whole day. This has become an especially important consideration, as she fears her four-year old son has fallen ill from drinking contaminated groundwater. But without much money and limited access to healthcare, ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Female farmers, fishers and herbalists of riverine villages relied on fresh water not only for their businesses and livelihoods, but also to perform daily tasks. Take something as simple as doing laundry. Women who previously washed clothes by the river now have to collect rainwater in buckets to do their washing, stretching this task several hours. In other words, instead of spending time doing work that could earn them money or going to school, or participating in a job training program, women now spend the greater part of their day sourcing food, water and tending to sick children and relatives. Water contamination resulting from the oil spills made this no ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The hit [from an oil spill caused by militant groups] to the country’s economy is significant, as more than than two-thirds of state budget comes from crude exports. But what do these numbers not show? How this disaster has shrunk the time that many women had to do paid work by increasing their unpaid work load. The labor that keeps the women in the Niger Delta busy tends to be care work—looking after children, the elderly, the ill—as well as cooking and cleaning. This is work that technically has a market value, but is done for free inside the home, and therefore traditional productivity measures like GDP don’t capture it. ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"The hit [from an oil spill caused by militant groups] to the country’s economy is significant, as more than than two-thirds of state budget comes from crude exports. But what do these numbers not show? How this disaster has shrunk the time that many women had to do paid work by increasing their unpaid work load. The labor that keeps the women in the Niger Delta busy tends to be care work—looking after children, the elderly, the ill—as well as cooking and cleaning. This is work that technically has a market value, but is done for free inside the home, and therefore traditional productivity measures like GDP don’t capture it. ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-2

"The labor that keeps the women in the Niger Delta busy tends to be care work—looking after children, the elderly, the ill—as well as cooking and cleaning"(para 3)."Female farmers, fishers and herbalists of riverine villages relied on fresh water not only for their businesses and livelihoods, but also to perform daily tasks. Take something as simple as doing laundry. Women who previously washed clothes by the river now have to collect rainwater in buckets to do their washing, stretching this task several hours. In other words, instead of spending time doing work that could earn them money or going to school, or participating in a job training program, women now ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

"And the impacts on families are dire: Sarah Okolo is doubtful she can raise the startup money for her food stall. On average it takes her twenty minutes to walk to the market, but Okolo worries that her working day would mean her two small children would have to be on their own for too long, and she does not have an arrangement for somebody to watch them for the whole day. This has become an especially important consideration, as she fears her four-year old son has fallen ill from drinking contaminated groundwater. But without much money and limited access to healthcare, she is left as his primary caretaker—a role ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1, SMES-DATA-1, SMES-DATA-2, SMES-DATA-3

"And the impacts [from the oil spill caused by militant groups] on families are dire: Sarah Okolo is doubtful she can raise the startup money for her food stall. On average it takes her twenty minutes to walk to the market, but Okolo worries that her working day would mean her two small children would have to be on their own for too long, and she does not have an arrangement for somebody to watch them for the whole day. This has become an especially important consideration, as she fears her four-year old son has fallen ill from drinking contaminated groundwater. But without much money and limited access to healthcare, ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1, ERBG-DATA-5

"The hit [from an oil spill caused by militant groups] to the country’s economy is significant, as more than than two-thirds of state budget comes from crude exports. But what do these numbers not show? How this disaster has shrunk the time that many women had to do paid work by increasing their unpaid work load"(para 2)."Female farmers, fishers and herbalists of riverine villages relied on fresh water not only for their businesses and livelihoods, but also to perform daily tasks. Take something as simple as doing laundry. Women who previously washed clothes by the river now have to collect rainwater in buckets to do their washing, stretching this task ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-3

"Ostensibly, Delta State where these attacks take place has enough oil wealth to invest in an infrastructure that would help make it easier for women like Okolo and Ekiyor to balance their domestic and work responsibilities—including investments in child care, schools and hospitals. In fact, many residents advocate for that kind of spending, and activists have historically demanded that a greater share of the oil wealth be invested back into communities. But this hasn’t happened, although Delta State has a $78.6 million budget for the region’s development. Under-funding, delays in disbursement and corruption have largely affected progress. In addition, in this restive region, the federal government, backed by a $1.3 ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 7:40 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2, ERBG-DATA-2

"The hit [from an oil spill caused by militant groups] to the country’s economy is significant, as more than than two-thirds of state budget comes from crude exports. But what do these numbers not show? How this disaster has shrunk the time that many women had to do paid work by increasing their unpaid work load"(para 2)."Female farmers, fishers and herbalists of riverine villages relied on fresh water not only for their businesses and livelihoods, but also to perform daily tasks. Take something as simple as doing laundry. Women who previously washed clothes by the river now have to collect rainwater in buckets to do their washing, stretching this task ...more
Nov. 30, 2017, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

According to AgeOfConsent's data, the legal age of consent is 11 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Angola, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, United Arab Emirates
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor. NGO reports indicated the laborers were managed by the government as a matter of state policy and were under constant and close surveillance by DPRK security agents. Laborers worked between 12 and 16 hours ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:12 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Angola, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, United Arab Emirates
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor"(17).This data does not specifically mention women but if trafficking is occuring, women may be especially vulnerable (ENB-Coder Comment)more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:09 p.m.
Countries: Angola, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, United Arab Emirates
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor. NGO reports indicated the laborers were managed by the government as a matter of state policy and were under constant and close surveillance by DPRK security agents. Laborers worked between 12 and 16 hours ...more
Oct. 20, 2017, 10:49 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: INFIB-LAW-1, DV-LAW-1, RISW-PRACTICE-1

"While the former President Dr. Goodluck Jonathan was considered to have failed to effectively address the Boko Haram insurgency, in a bold exit move, he also left a legacy for the women of Nigeria, when he signed the Violence Against Persons (Prohibition) Act 2015 on May 25, 2015. The Act prohibits FGM, spousal battery, among other violations" (para 12).
Oct. 20, 2017, 10:48 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

"In Nigeria, while all citizens have borne the brunt of the jihadist group Boko Haram’s uprising against the government and its people, there has been indiscriminate abuse and violations subjected extensively and particularly against women" (para 11).