The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Pakistan

June 3, 2019, 10:48 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Vani or Swara refers to a customary practice common across Pakistan that serves as a method of resolving disputes and settling debts between families and tribes. According to this custom, female members from the offending male’s family are married/given to the victim’s family as a reparation or penance. These decisions are often made by a jirga or panchayat, a council of elders from the community who convene an informal court to decide methods for resolving disputes. Girls are often subject to inhumane treatment, rape and torture by their in-laws" (Pg 33).
June 3, 2019, 10:48 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-LAW-1

"In 1990, Pakistan ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Child, which prohibits child marriages. In addition, under the Muslim Family Law Ordinance, a girl must have attained the age of 16 and a boy must have attained the age of 18, and both need to consent before the marriage can take place" (Pg 32). "In 2011, the Pakistani legislature passed two landmark pro-woman bills aimed at protecting women from harmful traditional customs, including so-called marriage with the holy Quran and forced wedlock, and seeking severe punishments for the violators" (Pg 33).
June 3, 2019, 10:48 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"The data presented here is by Shirkat Gah Women’s Resource Centre in Pakistan, which is making its own submission to the OHCHR on this subject. Shirkat Gah works to address both the physical, psychological and emotional effects of violence against women, through research and publications, advocacy, lobbying for legal reform, and community outreach. They have offices in three cities of Pakistan: Lahore, Peshawar and Islamabad" (Pg 32).
June 3, 2019, 10:48 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"In Pakistan, most traditional marriages are arranged by the families, and the ability for a boy or a girl to openly get to know and choose their partner seldom occurs. In the process of such marriages being arranged by family members, safeguards in the law are often overlooked and minimum age of marriage and need for mutual consent are not guaranteed, resulting in a forced marriage...Historically, however, the State has done very little to ensure that marriages are consensual and in many instances the age of a girl will be changed on her marriage certificate in order to avoid questions over her being underage. The ability of individuals to bypass...more
June 3, 2019, 10:48 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"In 1990, Pakistan ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Child, which prohibits child marriages. In addition, under the Muslim Family Law Ordinance, a girl must have attained the age of 16 and a boy must have attained the age of 18, and both need to consent before the marriage can take place" (Pg 32).
May 22, 2019, 10:22 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"On International Women’s Day in Pakistan last month, thousands of exuberant young feminists staged their second Aurat (women’s) March. Intended to build on the success of a well-received march last year, it was designed to be inclusive, peaceful and raucously joyful. It had women from all walks of life, some in Western clothes, others in full veils, head scarves and burqas. Women from cities and villages. Female health workers and teachers. Trans women and male allies" (Para 1). "Recalling the joys of the 2018 march, the activists and volunteers had gone to low-income neighborhoods and rallied women there. They bused women from rural villages. They printed fliers with artwork by...more
May 22, 2019, 10:22 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-3

"But the backlash was immediate, and it grew uglier day by day. First came threats of violence: Anonymous groups of young men searched Instagram for pictures of women who participated in the march and sent them threats of rape and murder. A Muslim cleric declared on television that the march’s slogan — 'My body, my choice' — encouraged women to be promiscuous, which allowed men to rape them. Two weeks after the march, a resolution in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Assembly was proposed by a female legislator from a right wing religious party. It condemned the march and its slogans as 'shameful' and 'obscene.' The resolution was unanimously adopted" (Para 4)....more
May 22, 2019, 10:22 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"But the backlash was immediate, and it grew uglier day by day. First came threats of violence: Anonymous groups of young men searched Instagram for pictures of women who participated in the march and sent them threats of rape and murder. A Muslim cleric declared on television that the march’s slogan — 'My body, my choice' — encouraged women to be promiscuous, which allowed men to rape them. Two weeks after the march, a resolution in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Assembly was proposed by a female legislator from a right wing religious party. It condemned the march and its slogans as 'shameful' and 'obscene.' The resolution was unanimously adopted" (Para 4)....more
May 22, 2019, 10:22 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-DATA-1

"In the last week of March, news outlets and social media focused on egregious cases of violence against women: A Christian woman was kidnapped, forcibly converted and raped. A husband beat his wife and shaved her head when she refused to dance for his friends. Another woman was beaten and kept in chains by her husband. April brought even worse: news of one man cutting his divorced wife’s tongue off, and another arrested for kidnapping his 14-year-old niece in order to traffic and sell her in Karachi" (Para 5-6).
May 22, 2019, 10:22 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The furor over this year’s march illustrates a complex dynamic of misogyny that is deeply rooted in Pakistani society. At its center is an unwillingness to change toward a progressive vision of a nation that protects the constitutional rights of women — rights enshrined in the Constitution of 1973, which says 'there shall be no discrimination on the basis of sex alone'" (Para 12).
May 22, 2019, 10:22 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"On International Women’s Day in Pakistan last month, thousands of exuberant young feminists staged their second Aurat (women’s) March. Intended to build on the success of a well-received march last year, it was designed to be inclusive, peaceful and raucously joyful. It had women from all walks of life, some in Western clothes, others in full veils, head scarves and burqas. Women from cities and villages. Female health workers and teachers. Trans women and male allies" (Para 1).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Pakistan can legally travel outside the country and her own home in the same way as a man (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-4

Women are not able to work in the same industries as men in Pakistan (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

Women make up 22% of the total labor force in Pakistan (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

Primary education in Pakistan is free and compulsory (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

Women in Pakistan are not legally required to obey their husbands (122). In Pakistan, the original owner of any property legally administers the property in marriage (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-LAW-2, AFE-PRACTICE-1

There is legislation on sexual harassment in education in Pakistan (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: GIC-LAW-1

There is not paid maternity leave available to women in Pakistan of at least 14 weeks. Women receive at least 2/3 of their wages for the duration of their maternity leave. The government pays for 0% of maternity leave benefits. There is no paid parental leave. Mothers are not guaranteed an equivalent position after returning to work from maternity leave. The government does not support or provide childcare services. Childcare payments are not tax deductible (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-LAW-3

A woman cannot apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man. A woman in Pakistan can sign a contract without requiring the presence of her husband or male relatives (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAD-LAW-1

Sons and daughters do not have equal inheritance rights in Pakistan (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

Discrimination based on marital status is not prohibited in access to credit in Pakistan (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

Women in Pakistan cannot work the same night hours as men. Women cannot work in jobs deemed hazardous, arduous, or morally inappropriate. Women are not able to perform the same tasks at work as men (122). The ages at which women and men can retire with full pension benefits are not equal. The ages at which men and women can retire with partial pension benefits are not equal (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

A woman in Pakistan can legally choose where she lives in the same way as a man (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Pakistan cannot legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-1

Pakistani law does not mandate equal remuneration for work of equal value. The ages at which men and women can retire with full pension benefits are not equal, and the ages to retire with partial pension benefits for men and women are not equal (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MULV-LAW-1

The government of Pakistan does not provide for valuation of nonmonetary contributions, such as staying at home to take care of children or other dependents (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: GIC-LAW-3

There is not paid maternity leave available to women in Pakistan of at least 14 weeks. Women receive at least 2/3 of their wages for the duration of their maternity leave. The government pays for 0% of maternity leave benefits. There is no paid parental leave. Mothers are not guaranteed an equivalent position after returning to work from maternity leave. The government does not support or provide childcare services. Childcare payments are not tax deductible (122). Parents in Pakistan are not able to work flexibly (122). Working flexibly, such as working from home or taking partial days off to care for children, could be considered a childcare benefit (EJ-CODER COMMENT).more
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: DV-LAW-1

There is legislation specifically addressing domestic violence in Pakistan (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LO-LAW-1

A woman in Pakistan can legally sign a contract, and open a bank account in the same way as a man. A woman in Pakistan cannot register a business in the same way as a man. Men and women have equal ownership rights to immovable property (122). Discrimination based on gender is not prohibited in access to credit in Pakistan, and neither is discrimination based on marital status (122).
May 16, 2019, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

A woman in Pakistan can legally get a job in the same way as a man. Women cannot work the same night hours as men. Women are not able to work in jobs deemed hazardous, arduous, or morally inappropriate. Women are not able to perform the same tasks at work as men. Women cannot work in the same industries as men (122). The ages at which men and women cannot retire with full pension benefits are equal. The ages at which women and men cannot retire with partial pension benefits are not equal (122).