The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Pakistan

Dec. 8, 2019, 5:20 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ATDW-LAW-5

"Most Islamic countries, including Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan and Bangladesh, have banned triple talaq, but the custom continued in India, which does not have a uniform set of laws on marriage and divorce that apply to every citizen" (para. 15).
Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Fiji, Gabon, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Niger, North Korea, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Korea, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Zambia
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

2.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Comoros, East Timor, Egypt, Fiji, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Moldova, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

2.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"During the reporting period, the government repealed the Prevention and Control of Human Trafficking Ordinance (PACHTO) and replaced it with the 2018 (PTPA). The 2018 PTPA criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking and prescribed penalties of up to seven years’ imprisonment, a fine of up to 1 million Pakistani rupees (PKR) ($7,220), or both for trafficking offenses involving an adult male victim, and penalties of between two and 10 years’ imprisonment, a fine of up to 1 million PKR ($7,220), or both for those involving adult female or child victims. These penalties were sufficiently stringent. However, with regard to sex trafficking, by allowing for a fine in lieu of imprisonment,...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Pakistan, and traffickers exploit victims from Pakistan abroad. The country’s largest human trafficking problem is bonded labor, in which an initial debt assumed by a worker as part of the terms of employment is exploited, ultimately entrapping other family members, sometimes for generations (...) Observers report some police accept bribes to ignore prostitution in general, some of which may include sex trafficking (...) In previous years, trafficking experts have described a structured system for exploiting women, girls, and LGBTI individuals in sex trafficking, including offering victims for sale in physical markets. Women and girls are...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Pakistan does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking; however, it is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Pakistan remained on Tier 2. These efforts included passing the country’s first comprehensive human trafficking law that criminalized all forms of sex trafficking and labor trafficking; securing its first conviction in 10 years of an official complicit in human trafficking; and identifying and referring an increased number of trafficking victims to care. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. Overall law enforcement efforts against labor trafficking...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"FIA did not identify any trafficking victims, a decrease from 17 victims identified in the previous reporting period. Provincial police identified 19,723 victims, an increase from 14,588 victims identified in 2017" (374).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
July 20, 2019, 7:11 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"Where there are no males, some tribes like the Hazaras, provide for women’s inheritance though the actual control of the property remains in the hands of the uncles. Often, as soon as a woman’s name has been entered in the transfer papers, a gift is made in favour of the brothers. Therefore, even if women’s names are registered in the property transfer papers, upon succession, the male relatives inherit the land in their stead" (para 1). "In Punjab, women generally may inherit property but they cannot decide anything regarding its usage. Immovable property is very rarely transferred to women except in few more affluent families. In some cases, dowry is...more
July 20, 2019, 7:09 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAW-PRACTICE-1

"[Widows] lose their right to inheritance if they remarry outside the family of the deceased husband" (para 1)
July 20, 2019, 7:07 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAD-PRACTICE-1

"In general, women do not inherit land if there is a male offspring" (para 1). "In the North West Frontier Province, women do not inherit land in the presence of a male offspring, nor is there a tradition of daughters inheriting immovable property from the father except in some areas, such as Dera Ismail Khan, Mardan and Swabi, where in rare cases, daughters are given a share in moveable and immovable property" (para 2). "In case of only female offspring, dowry is given to compensate for landed property which is not given to women except in Thar, the remote desert region of Sindh, where some women inherit property" (para 5)more
July 20, 2019, 6:51 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Women have the legal right to acquire land via Islamic and state law; however, their inheritance rights are governed by Islamic Sharia law. Women may inherit from their fathers, mothers, husbands or children, and under certain conditions, from other family members, but their share is generally smaller than that to which men are entitled. The social status attached to property and land often makes it difficult for widows and daughters to inherit even their entitled shares, as they may face opposition from the deceased man’s relatives. The 2011 Anti-Women Practices Law makes it a punishable offence to deprive women of their inheritance right" (1-2)
July 19, 2019, 9:41 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1, POLY-LAW-1

"Inheritance practices are to a great extent governed by Sharia law" (188)
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1, MURDER-LAW-1, MURDER-DATA-1

"The 2010 Acid Control and Acid Crime Practice Bill makes maiming or killing via corrosive substance a crime and imposes stiff penalties against perpetrators. As with other laws, these measures are not applicable to FATA and PATA unless the president issues a notification to that effect. Nevertheless, there were numerous acid attacks on women across the country, with few perpetrators bought to justice. According to a panel organized by the HRCP in October, more than 98 percent of registered acid-attack cases remained unresolved. The HRCP alleged that authorities registered 150 to 400 cases of acid attacks each year. In May, two women suffered burn injuries when a man, in a...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"The 2011 Prevention of Anti-Women Practices Act makes it illegal to deny women inheritance of property by deceitful means. The law entitles female children to one-half the inheritance of male children. Wives inherit one-eighth of their husband’s estate. Women often received far less than their legal entitlement" (Pg 47).
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-3, DSFMF-PRACTICE-4, DSFMF-LAW-1

"In 2010 the FSC declared several clauses of the Women’s Protection Act un-Islamic and unconstitutional. The verdict sought to reinstate certain provisions of the 1979 Hudood Ordinance and expand the FSC’s jurisdiction in cases of adultery and false accusations of adultery. Reinstatement of these provisions could permit reintroduction of adultery charges against female rape victims. In 2011 the federal government appealed the FSC’s decision to the Supreme Court, which had not set a hearing date by year’s end. In 2013 the nongovernmental Council of Islamic Ideology, which advises Parliament and the prime minister, rejected the Women’s Protection Act, saying it was contrary to the spirit of the Koran and sharia"...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"At times women were victims of various types of societal violence and abuse, including honor killings, forced marriages, imposed isolation, and being used to settle tribal disputes. There were cases in which husbands and male family members treated women as chattel" (Pg 43). "Although prohibited by law, the practice of buying and selling brides also continued in rural areas. Many tribes, communities, or families practiced sequestering women from all contact with men other than their relatives. Despite prohibitions on handing over women as compensation for crimes or as a resolution of a dispute (also known as 'vani; or 'swara'), the practice continued in Punjab and KP. In rural Sindh landowning...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"Spousal rape is not a crime" (Pg 41).
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: GP-DATA-5

"To address societal norms that disapprove of victims who report gender-based violence and abuse, the government established women’s police stations, staffed by female officers, to offer women a safe haven where they could safely report complaints and file charges. Men were also able to use these police stations. These women’s police stations, however, struggled with understaffing and limited equipment. Training female police and changing the cultural assumptions of male police also remained challenges. Due to restrictions on women’s mobility and social pressures related to women’s appearance in public, utilization of women’s police centers was limited, but NGOs and officials reported that use was growing and more centers were needed. Many...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: EMCMS-LAW-1

"While regulations prohibit discrimination in employment and occupation regarding race, sex, gender, disability, language, sexual orientation and/or gender identity, HIV-positive status or other communicable diseases, or social status, the government did not effectively enforce those laws and regulations. Discrimination with respect to employment and occupation based on these factors persisted. The nature of penalties for violations was insufficient to deter violations" (Pg 59).
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-3

"Informal justice systems lacking institutionalized legal protections continued, especially in rural areas, and often resulted in human rights abuses. Feudal landlords and other community leaders in Sindh and Punjab, and tribal leaders in Pashtun and Baloch areas, at times held local council meetings (known as panchayats or jirgas), in defiance of the established legal system. Such councils settled feuds and imposed tribal penalties, including fines, imprisonment, and sometimes the death penalty. These councils often sentenced women to violent punishment or death for so-called honor-related crimes. In Pashtun areas, primarily in FATA, such councils were held under FCR guidelines. Assistant political agents, supported by tribal elders of their choosing, are legally...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"There were no reliable national, provincial, or local statistics on rape due to underreporting and a lack of any centralized law enforcement data collection system. The Aurat Foundation reported in 2014 that 1,515 women were raped with 1,408 instances in Punjab, 85 in Sindh, five in KP, four in Balochistan, and 13 in the Islamabad Capital Territory" (Pg 41).
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

"Although the 2010 Criminal Law Amendment Act and the Protection Against Harassment of Women at Workplace Act criminalize sexual harassment in the workplace and public sphere, the problem was widespread. The law requires all provinces to establish provincial-level ombudsmen. Sindh was the first province to do so, in 2012. Punjab Province and administrative district Gilgit-Baltistan also established ombudsmen. Neither Balochistan nor KP had an ombudsman. Press reports indicated harassment was especially high among domestic workers and nurses. A press report indicated that the social media also targeted young female doctors for harassment" (Pg 45).
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"There were some reports of women being trafficked and prostituted out of shelters. Shelter staff reportedly sometimes discriminated against women in shelters; they assumed that if women fled their homes, it was because they were women of ill repute. In some cases women were reportedly abused at the government-run shelters, found their movements severely restricted, or were pressured to return to their abusers. In November the Punjab government broke ground on a pilot Violence Against Women Center in Multan, which would provide legal, medical, psychological, and other aid, and serve as a model for other centers in the province" (Pg 43).
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, IIP-LAW-1

"Although prohibited by law, the practice of buying and selling brides also continued in rural areas. Many tribes, communities, or families practiced sequestering women from all contact with men other than their relatives. Despite prohibitions on handing over women as compensation for crimes or as a resolution of a dispute (also known as 'vani; or 'swara'), the practice continued in Punjab and KP. In rural Sindh landowning families continued the practice of 'marriage to the Koran,' forcing a female family member to stay unmarried to avoid division of property. Property of women married to the Koran remained under the legal control of their fathers or eldest brothers, and such women...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: VOTE-LAW-1

"While no laws prevent women from voting, cultural and traditional barriers in tribal and rural areas impeded some women from voting" (Pg 37).
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2, DACH-DATA-2

"Couples and individuals have the right to decide the number, spacing, and timing of children, but they often lacked the information and means to do so. Couples and individuals did not have the right to attain the highest standard of reproductive health, free from discrimination, coercion, and violence. Young girls and women were especially vulnerable to problems related to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights. They often lacked information and means to access care. According to a survey by the Women’s Empowerment Group released during 2013, only 25 percent of adolescents were aware of their sexual and reproductive rights. Spousal opposition also contributed to the challenges women faced in...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: CWC-DATA-3

"Refugees could not legally work, but many worked as day laborers or in informal markets. Local employers often exploited refugees in the informal labor market with low or unpaid wages. Women and children were particularly vulnerable, accepting underpaid and undesirable work" (Pg 33). "There were a number of Afghan private schools, including those funded through foreign assistance, but Afghan children usually could attend the country’s primary schools. For older students, particularly females in refugee villages, access to education remained difficult. Afghans who grew up in Pakistan needed student visas to attend universities, but they qualified for student visas on the basis of their PoR cards. Afghan students were eligible to...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"Rape is a criminal offense, with punishment that ranges from a minimum of 10 to 25 years in prison and a fine to the death penalty. The penalty for gang rape is death or life imprisonment, but sentences, when they occurred, were often less severe. Although rape was frequent, prosecutions were rare. According to data presented by the Ministry of Interior to the senate in 2014, there had been no rape convictions in the country during previous years. Media reported at least one rape conviction in October, with the accused reportedly receiving a 12-year prison sentence. As in previous years, the government did not effectively enforce the 2006 Women’s Protection...more
June 19, 2019, 1:33 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"Rape is a criminal offense, with punishment that ranges from a minimum of 10 to 25 years in prison and a fine to the death penalty. The penalty for gang rape is death or life imprisonment, but sentences, when they occurred, were often less severe. Although rape was frequent, prosecutions were rare. According to data presented by the Ministry of Interior to the senate in 2014, there had been no rape convictions in the country during previous years. Media reported at least one rape conviction in October, with the accused reportedly receiving a 12-year prison sentence" (Pg 41). "The penal code defines statutory rape as sexual intercourse with a girl...more