The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Russia

Nov. 10, 2017, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: China, Russia
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor. NGO reports indicated the laborers were managed by the government as a matter of state policy and were under constant and close surveillance by DPRK security agents. Laborers worked between 12 and 16 hours ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:12 p.m.
Countries: China, Russia
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor"(17).This data does not specifically mention women but if trafficking is occuring, women may be especially vulnerable (ENB-Coder Comment)
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:09 p.m.
Countries: China, Russia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor. NGO reports indicated the laborers were managed by the government as a matter of state policy and were under constant and close surveillance by DPRK security agents. Laborers worked between 12 and 16 hours ...more
Nov. 7, 2017, 11:01 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: LDS-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-4

"Conservative traditions once meant it was not acceptable for Tajik women to work to earn a living, but the situation has changed. Huge numbers of Tajik men travel to Russia as labour migrants each year, leaving many jobs to be filled by women [in Tajikistan]"(para 4)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ATC-DATA-1

"Russian law is rather progressive in respect of the women’s rights, even though the Committee to End Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) recommends that Russia adopt more comprehensive legislation to prevent and address violence against women, and notes the absence of an effective complaints mechanism for women to claim their rights"(para 8)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"Women carried a special burden on their shoulders during the republic’s two wars. Men fought on both sides, and for those who didn’t, it was dangerous to move through the republic’s numerous checkpoints. They could be arrested, abducted, tortured or killed. Women became the main breadwinners, took care of children, cleared away debris and repaired damaged houses. They negotiated with the military, and when men were abducted by security services they blocked roads, protested, spent days in official institutions trying to establish their whereabouts, and searched through mass graves. Some eventually started to document crimes and became outspoken human rights defenders"(para 12)."Though he [Chechnya’s dictator Ramzan Kadyrov] officially bans under-age ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: MULV-DATA-1

"Many Chechen women remain family breadwinners and still have to do all the housework, but since the war their social status has dramatically changed for the worse"(para 14)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-3

"All of this [conflict between Russia and the North Caucusus] has shaped women’s experiences and roles – as victims, providers of security and perpetrators of violence – not just in Chechnya but also in the neighbouring republics of Ingushetia and Dagestan"(para 3)."Women carried a special burden on their shoulders during the republic’s two wars. Men fought on both sides, and for those who didn’t, it was dangerous to move through the republic’s numerous checkpoints. They could be arrested, abducted, tortured or killed. Women became the main breadwinners, took care of children, cleared away debris and repaired damaged houses. They negotiated with the military, and when men were abducted by security ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ADDL-DATA-1

"In one hospital in Ingushetia, several cases of alleged criminal negligence, including instances in which women lost their babies and reproductive organs and one woman died, have been reported, most recently in September 2015. Investigations have so far led nowhere. In Dagestan, three women reportedly died in a hospital in the town of Kizilyurt in the last couple of months, relatives claim as a result of criminal negligence. Earlier this year, the death of a woman in the maternity ward of Dagestan’s Khasavyurt brought hundreds of protesters into the streets and ended up in stone throwing and disturbances"(para 6)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Women carried a special burden on their shoulders during the republic’s two wars. Men fought on both sides, and for those who didn’t, it was dangerous to move through the republic’s numerous checkpoints. They could be arrested, abducted, tortured or killed. Women became the main breadwinners, took care of children, cleared away debris and repaired damaged houses. They negotiated with the military, and when men were abducted by security services they blocked roads, protested, spent days in official institutions trying to establish their whereabouts, and searched through mass graves"(para 12)."Many Chechen women remain family breadwinners and still have to do all the housework, but since the war their social status ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-1

"In Chechnya and Ingushetia many are deprived of their children after divorce – with reference to purported 'tradition' which allegedly prescribes children to be raised in their father’s family – and are often denied visiting rights. Some have been struggling to see their children for years"(para 4)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: CWC-DATA-3, CWC-DATA-4

"Since 2000, Russia has been hit by 82 suicide bombing attacks involving 125 suicide bombers, at least 52 of whom were women. I know of several families in Dagestan whose young women adopted radical strands of Islam and then converted their siblings and even their fathers. One by one their family members joined the insurgency in Russia and were killed, or are now members of the so-called Islamic State (IS). In the last two years many radical women from the North Caucasus have resettled in areas of Syria and Iraq under IS control"(para 19)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DTCP-LAW-1

"Most of these crimes are punishable under Russian law. Yet, Russia is not able or is reluctant to enforce some aspects of its laws when it comes to gender-based violations, in some of its North Caucasus republics where women’s problems continue to be under-researched, under-reported, and insufficiently addressed by both central and local authorities"(para 7)."However, for a woman in Chechnya, Ingushetia or Dagestan the situation is further complicated by the fact that Russian law is just one of the three co-existing legal systems that regulate her position: customary law, Islamic sharia law and/or Russian law. All these systems are open to arbitrary interpretations, which can lead to serious infringement of ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: GP-DATA-2

"Women carried a special burden on their shoulders during the republic’s two wars. Men fought on both sides, and for those who didn’t, it was dangerous to move through the republic’s numerous checkpoints. They could be arrested, abducted, tortured or killed. Women became the main breadwinners, took care of children, cleared away debris and repaired damaged houses. They negotiated with the military, and when men were abducted by security services they blocked roads, protested, spent days in official institutions trying to establish their whereabouts, and searched through mass graves. Some eventually started to document crimes and became outspoken human rights defenders"(para 12)."Women in the North Caucasus are not only victims ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2, ERBG-DATA-2, ERBG-DATA-3

"Women carried a special burden on their shoulders during the republic’s two wars. Men fought on both sides, and for those who didn’t, it was dangerous to move through the republic’s numerous checkpoints. They could be arrested, abducted, tortured or killed. Women became the main breadwinners"(para 12)."Many Chechen women remain family breadwinners and still have to do all the housework, but since the war their social status has dramatically changed for the worse"(para 14)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1

"All school girls in Chechnya have to wear a head scarf".This statement is found in the caption of the first photo (ENB-Coder Comment)."Chechnya’s 38-year-old dictator Ramzan Kadyrov declared that his regime was going to restore traditional values and mores, and today exerts immense pressure on women. He has described women as a husband’s property, whose main role is to bear children. In 2007, he introduced a strict dress code (a head scarf, shirts with long sleeves and long skirts) in government institutions, including schools"(para 15)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, LRW-PRACTICE-2, LRW-PRACTICE-3, LRW-DATA-1, DV-PRACTICE-1

"In Chechnya, sexual violence by close relatives, is hardly ever prosecuted; if such a crime becomes public knowledge, the victim may be killed to 'purge the family shame'"(para 4)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Even when Russian courts pass decisions in favour of women, the local authorities, especially in Chechnya, openly sabotage their implementation. They have, for example, ignored court orders in favour of women in custody disputes, citing 'tradition'. In one case taken to the European Court for Human Rights, the Russian state itself cited 'tradition' as an obstacle to enforcing custody decisions. Some mothers have been unlawfully separated from their children for years"(para 9)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"Women and girls in Chechnya are subject to honour killings, domestic violence, abductions for marriage and early marriages"(para 4)."In Chechnya, sexual violence by close relatives, is hardly ever prosecuted; if such a crime becomes public knowledge, the victim may be killed to 'purge the family shame'"(para 4)."There are no distinct state statistics about crimes committed against women in Russia, an omission that international monitoring institutions repeatedly advise state authorities to correct. Perpetrators also go to great lengths to conceal their crimes. Honour killings and domestic violence are also reported in republics beyond Chechnya. Most recently in Dagestan, a father reportedly killed his two daughters for coming home late, while another ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Women carried a special burden on their shoulders during the republic’s two wars. Men fought on both sides, and for those who didn’t, it was dangerous to move through the republic’s numerous checkpoints. They could be arrested, abducted, tortured or killed. Women became the main breadwinners"(para 12)."He [Chechnya’s dictator Ramzan Kadyrov] advocates polygamy as the solution when women run foul of traditional law, saying it is 'better to be a second or third wife than to be killed'. Though he officially bans under-age marriage and bridal abduction, cases of local security servicemen forcing very young girls into marriages, and as second or de facto temporary wives have been reported. Women’s ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: CUST-PRACTICE-1

"In Chechnya and Ingushetia many are deprived of their children after divorce – with reference to purported 'tradition' which allegedly prescribes children to be raised in their father’s family – and are often denied visiting rights. Some have been struggling to see their children for years"(para 4)."Even when Russian courts pass decisions in favour of women, the local authorities, especially in Chechnya, openly sabotage their implementation. They have, for example, ignored court orders in favour of women in custody disputes, citing 'tradition'. In one case taken to the European Court for Human Rights, the Russian state itself cited 'tradition' as an obstacle to enforcing custody decisions. Some mothers have been ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-1

"He [Chechnya’s dictator Ramzan Kadyrov] advocates polygamy as the solution when women run foul of traditional law, saying it is 'better to be a second or third wife than to be killed'. Though he officially bans under-age marriage and bridal abduction, cases of local security servicemen forcing very young girls into marriages, and as second or de facto temporary wives have been reported. Women’s activists told me that parents are afraid their daughters be seen in public, especially in the evenings, for fear of them being noticed by people in positions of power. Families cannot resist pressure from powerful security types who may seek to take them for marriage"(para 16)more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Women and girls in Chechnya are subject to honour killings, domestic violence, abductions for marriage and early marriages"(para 4). Abductions could imply that women are taken to live with the husband's family (ENB-Coder Comment)."In Chechnya and Ingushetia many are deprived of their children after divorce – with reference to purported 'tradition' which allegedly prescribes children to be raised in their father’s family – and are often denied visiting rights. Some have been struggling to see their children for years"(para 4)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: CUST-LAW-1

"Even when Russian courts pass decisions in favour of women, the local authorities, especially in Chechnya, openly sabotage their implementation. They have, for example, ignored court orders in favour of women in custody disputes, citing 'tradition'. In one case taken to the European Court for Human Rights, the Russian state itself cited 'tradition' as an obstacle to enforcing custody decisions. Some mothers have been unlawfully separated from their children for years"(para 9)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: AOM-LAW-1, GEW-PRACTICE-1

"Though he [Chechnya’s dictator Ramzan Kadyrov] officially bans under-age marriage and bridal abduction, cases of local security servicemen forcing very young girls into marriages, and as second or de facto temporary wives have been reported. Women’s activists told me that parents are afraid their daughters be seen in public, especially in the evenings, for fear of them being noticed by people in positions of power. Families cannot resist pressure from powerful security types who may seek to take them for marriage"(para 16)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-4, MARR-DATA-2, PW-PRACTICE-2, PW-PRACTICE-3, PW-LAW-1, PW-DATA-1

"He [Chechnya’s dictator Ramzan Kadyrov] advocates polygamy as the solution when women run foul of traditional law, saying it is 'better to be a second or third wife than to be killed'. Though he officially bans under-age marriage and bridal abduction, cases of local security servicemen forcing very young girls into marriages, and as second or de facto temporary wives have been reported"(para 16)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-2

"Paradoxically the extreme conditions of war were liberating for women. The pressure of tradition was forced aside as wartime conditions and the absence of men created an opening for women to take up leading roles in society"(para 13)."Many Chechen women remain family breadwinners and still have to do all the housework, but since the war their social status has dramatically changed for the worse"(para 14)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: RCDW-LAW-2

"Chechnya’s 38-year-old dictator Ramzan Kadyrov declared that his regime was going to restore traditional values and mores, and today exerts immense pressure on women. He has described women as a husband’s property, whose main role is to bear children. In 2007, he introduced a strict dress code (a head scarf, shirts with long sleeves and long skirts) in government institutions, including schools"(para 15)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: EWCMS-PRACTICE-1

"Women carried a special burden on their shoulders during the republic’s two wars. Men fought on both sides...Women became the main breadwinners, took care of children, cleared away debris and repaired damaged houses"(para 12)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: FSCB-PRACTICE-1, FSCB-LAW-1

"In one hospital in Ingushetia, several cases of alleged criminal negligence, including instances in which women lost their babies and reproductive organs and one woman died, have been reported, most recently in September 2015. Investigations have so far led nowhere. In Dagestan, three women reportedly died in a hospital in the town of Kizilyurt in the last couple of months, relatives claim as a result of criminal negligence. Earlier this year, the death of a woman in the maternity ward of Dagestan’s Khasavyurt brought hundreds of protesters into the streets and ended up in stone throwing and disturbances.Most of these crimes are punishable under Russian law. Yet, Russia is not ...more