The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Saudi Arabia

Jan. 30, 2018, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: VOTE-LAW-1

"Women can now vote in municipal elections and work in some retail and hospitality jobs" (Para 24).
Jan. 30, 2018, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-2

"Nasief said women would still require a male relative's consent to travel, as well as obtain and renew passports" (Para 10).
Jan. 30, 2018, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"The decree by King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, issued last month but first reported on Thursday, said women should not be required to obtain consent for services 'unless there is a legal basis for the request in accordance with the provision of the Islamic [law]', according to local media. Women's rights activists said the memo codifies the rights of Saudi women to access a job, higher education or medical procedures and to exit prison, among others, without a guardian's permission" (Para 2-3). "The new directive is the latest in a series of moves in Saudi Arabia, one of the most gender-segregated nations in the world, to include more women ...more
Jan. 30, 2018, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"The decree by King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, issued last month but first reported on Thursday, said women should not be required to obtain consent for services 'unless there is a legal basis for the request in accordance with the provision of the Islamic [law]', according to local media" (Para 2). "Women can now vote in municipal elections and work in some retail and hospitality jobs. In 2012, they were allowed to compete in the Olympics for the first time" (Para 24).
Jan. 30, 2018, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"A Saudi royal decree allowing women greater access to government services without the consent of a male relative has drawn positive, but cautious, responses from human rights advocates" (Para 1). "The decree by King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, issued last month but first reported on Thursday, said women should not be required to obtain consent for services 'unless there is a legal basis for the request in accordance with the provision of the Islamic [law]', according to local media. Women's rights activists said the memo codifies the rights of Saudi women to access a job, higher education or medical procedures and to exit prison, among others, without a guardian's ...more
Jan. 30, 2018, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"A Saudi royal decree allowing women greater access to government services without the consent of a male relative has drawn positive, but cautious, responses from human rights advocates" (Para 1). "Sahar Nasief, a Jeddah-based activist who campaigns for an end to the guardianship system, welcomed the decree, which is to come into effect in three months, as a first step towards equal rights. 'Women are very happy, men too,' she said. 'Everyone is talking about it'" (Para 5-6). "Adam Coogle, a Middle East researcher at Human Rights Watch, called the directive a 'real step forward'. 'It's a very clear acknowledgment from the king himself that this is a problem,' Coogle ...more
Jan. 30, 2018, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

"In 2012, they [women] were allowed to compete in the Olympics for the first time" (Para 24).
Jan. 30, 2018, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The decree by King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, issued last month but first reported on Thursday, said women should not be required to obtain consent for services 'unless there is a legal basis for the request in accordance with the provision of the Islamic [law]', according to local media. Women's rights activists said the memo codifies the rights of Saudi women to access a job, higher education or medical procedures and to exit prison, among others, without a guardian's permission" (Para 2-3).
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

"When Al Maeena founded Jeddah United (JU), Saudi Arabia’s first private female basketball club, in 2003, the government did not license female gyms or clubs. The team’s players faced backlash from disapproving family members to texted threats and harassment by the religious police, Saudi Arabia’s official enforcers of strict social mores. But today, after a long campaign to change attitudes toward women’s athletics, the Saudi government has written them into Vision 2030, its new economic development plan to improve infrastructure, encourage community sports and support elite competitors" (para 2). "When her quest began, Al Maeena was among very few Saudi women to grow up exercising" (para 5). "Religious scholars have ...more
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ASR-LAW-2

"On July 11 — a decade and a half into Lina Al Maeena’s fight for women’s sports in Saudi Arabia — the Education Ministry announced that physical education classes in public schools will begin this fall. 'It’s a big, big deal,' Al Maeena tells OZY. 'It’s like your Title IX'" (para 1).
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"schools are gender segregated" (para 6).
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"At the center of that shift [towards encouraging women to participate in sports] is Al Maeena, whose strategy has been to rally the community before pushing for tectonic change. Armed with data supporting the link between sports and physical health, public piety and social values such as hard work and commitment, she looks at critics and sees potential allies" (para 3). "JU [a women's basketball team] grew quietly until 2009, when the team traveled to Jordan for a game broadcast on Saudi cable station Al Arabiya. After the match, newspapers published cover stories filled with outrage and decrying moral decline. Conservative clerics urged followers to 'protect' their daughters, wives and ...more
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-LAW-1

"[women] cannot drive" (para 6).
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SRACE-LAW-1

"When Al Maeena returned home after college in 2000, female sports were essentially prohibited" (para 8).
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"A year later, then–King Abdullah appointed the first women to the country’s advisory parliament" (para 13). "Last December, King Salman appointed Al Maeena to the Shura Council, charged with advising the cabinet on legislation, where she continues to trumpet the importance of playing sports" (para 15).
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1

"In Saudi Arabia, a kingdom founded by the Al Saud family, who forged an alliance with the conservative religious establishment, women are still legal minors, requiring the consent of a male relative to travel, work and study" (para 6).
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-2

"When Al Maeena founded Jeddah United (JU), Saudi Arabia’s first private female basketball club, in 2003, the government did not license female gyms or clubs, and only a few elite private schools offered sports for girls" (para 2).
Jan. 19, 2018, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"The team’s players [in the private female basketball club faced backlash from disapproving family members to texted threats and harassment by the religious police, Saudi Arabia’s official enforcers of strict social mores" (para 2).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

Saudi women found an innovative way to break their silence and expose stories of harassment, rape and physical abuse they face often on a daily basis. The hashtag #Break_Your_Silence_Speak_Up went viral among Saudi women who started sharing their bitter stories that often go untold (para 1-2).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Saudi women found an innovative way to break their silence and expose stories of harassment, rape and physical abuse they face often on a daily basis" (para 1). "Statistics released in 2016 show the continuous exposure of a large number of Saudi women to violence, despite a domestic violence awareness campaign launched in 2013 and a subsequent law criminalizing domestic abuse" (para 7). "#Break_Your_Silence_Speak_Up has been trending along with the hashtag that calls for the abolition of the male guardianship system, which reached day 220 of fighting" (para 17). "“Don’t back down from demanding your rights if you believe in justice,” tweeted (@MERiAM_AL3TEEBE) who is an outspoken justice activist with ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

"Violence against women can take many forms, not only physical or verbal. Psychological pain can result from constant threats or possibility of violence, one woman tweeted. 'I may not have been exposed to physical or verbal violence but I suffer from psychological violence every day because my life could turn upside down if someone wishes.'" (para 16).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"Meanwhile, the women’s campaign to expose the forms of harassment against them was faced with rejection and accusations of lying. However, despite the attacks by some deniers, those women have the support of several international human rights organizations" (para 19).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"An estimated 53 percent of men in 2016 are willing to use violence against their wives in case of disobedience, where 32 percent have already used physical abuse against their wives, according to a study conducted by researcher Norah Al-Musaed" (para 10).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LRCM-PRACTICE-2

"One woman said that she has been locked up for a year inside the house after her mother learned that her father had raped her over three years. She now needs to be treated for depression as a result of the psychological damage she endured (para 3).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"Saudi women found an innovative way to break their silence and expose stories of harassment, rape and physical abuse they face often on a daily basis" (para 1). "Along with sexual harassment, physical and verbal abuse takes place daily, according to some women" (para 5). 'Statistics released in 2016 show the continuous exposure of a large number of Saudi women to violence, despite a domestic violence awareness campaign launched in 2013 and a subsequent law criminalizing domestic abuse" (para 7). "The study also reported that 36 percent of the women expressed their acceptance of violence against them in case of misbehavior. Social media confirm that abuse is commonplace" (para 11).more
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-LAW-1

"Statistics released in 2016 show the continuous exposure of a large number of Saudi women to violence, despite a domestic violence awareness campaign launched in 2013 and a subsequent law criminalizing domestic abuse" (para 7).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:42 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-1

"Another woman named Sarah spoke up against her brother’s sexual harassment with the knowledge of the father who, in return, slapped her in the face. 'I was 8 years old,' she said. 'He taught me how to shut up every time I was molested'" (para 4). "Research has shown that 37 percent of husbands in Saudi Arabia oppress their wives and children, in addition to depriving women of seeing their family" (para 8). "Mashael Al-Bakri, a Saudi researcher, said in an interview with Al-Hayat newspaper one of the Saudi centers for domestic abuse victims that suppression of the wife or children and forbidding them from expressing their issues freely is ...more
Dec. 7, 2017, 8:25 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1, IIP-LAW-1, DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"until Saudi women can work, travel, file legal claims, and otherwise engage in public life without permission from their male guardians — their father or husband, sometimes even their son —the country won’t realize the economic potential of half its population" (para 3).
Dec. 7, 2017, 8:23 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-LAW-1, RISW-PRACTICE-1

"And so, amid broader political and economic upheaval — from multi-billion dollar mega projects to an anti-corruption purge that detained many of the country’s most prominent officials — Saudi Arabia’s bid to modernize its economy included the unexpected step of permitting women to drive" (para 2).
Dec. 2, 2017, 2:50 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"The main issue when it comes to empowerment is that there are still rules which discriminate against women and make them... incapable of taking important life decision" (para 13).