The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Saudi Arabia

Sept. 28, 2020, 11:04 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: MISA-DATA-2

In Saudia Arabia, the incidence of alcohol abuse disorders is 0.5% among men and 0.1% among women.
Sept. 24, 2020, 10:33 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DSFMF-LAW-1, RISW-PRACTICE-1

“Saudi Arabia has abolished flogging as a punishment, the supreme court announced… Previously the courts could order the flogging of convicts found guilty of offenses ranging from extramarital sex and breach of the peace to murder. In future, judges will have to choose between fines and/or jail sentences, or non-custodial alternatives like community service, the court said in a statement seen by AFP on Saturday” (Para. 1, 5-6).
Sept. 7, 2020, 7:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, D R Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Palestine, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: ISSA-SCALE-1

2.0more
Sept. 5, 2020, 5:02 p.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Suriname, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: AOM-SCALE-3

2.0
Sept. 5, 2020, 5:02 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burma/Myanmar, Haiti, Iran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mexico, Niger, Nigeria, Palestine, Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, United States, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: AOM-SCALE-2

2.0
Sept. 5, 2020, 5:01 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brunei, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kosovo, Latvia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States
Variables: AOM-SCALE-1

0.0
Sept. 3, 2020, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: WR-DATA-1

In Saudi Arabia, there are about 341,070 widows, as estimated in 2015.
Aug. 26, 2020, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ASR-LAW-2

“Saudi Arabia, an ultra-orthodox country…only officially allowed sport to be played in private girls' schools in May [2013]” (para 2).
Aug. 26, 2020, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

“[Raha Moharrak] stepped into the history books by becoming the first Saudi woman to climb to the summit of Mount Everest…[Her] only hope is that her achievements will help change the perception that Saudi women have of themselves…For Moharrak, the achievement is not being the first Saudi woman to conquer Everest, but to ensure she is not the last” (para 11, 19, 21).
Aug. 26, 2020, 3:10 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

“[Raha Moharrak] began climbing in November 2011 and in the space of a year, conquered eight mountains including Kilimanjaro…Then on May 18 this year, she stepped into the history books by becoming the first Saudi woman to climb to the summit of Mount Everest…She follows the path of America-based Sarah Attar who became the first Saudi woman to compete in an Olympics at the London Games last year” (para 9, 11, 17).
Aug. 26, 2020, 1:59 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-2

“The table titled, “What Style of Dress is Appropriate for Women in Public”, shows that 11% of surveyed Saudi Arabians believe that it is most appropriate for women to completely cover their face with a burqa while in public, and 63% believe women should cover their face, except their eyes, with a Niqab while in public” (1).
Aug. 26, 2020, 1:58 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1

“The survey treated the question of women’s dress as a visual preference. Each respondent was given a card depicting six styles of women’s headdress and asked to choose the woman most appropriately outfitted for a public place. Although no labels were included on the card, the styles ranged from a fully-hooded burqa (woman #1) and niqab (#2) to the less conservative hijab (women #4 and #5). There was also the option of a woman wearing no head covering of any type…In Saudi Arabia, a 63%-majority prefer woman #2, while an additional 11% say that the burqa worn by woman #1 is the most appropriate style of public dress for women”...more
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

“Women in that country cannot go to school, cannot vote, go shopping or otherwise engage in the public sphere without the permission of a man. Simple tasks like buying a cell phone, registering children for school, applying for a job, getting a bank account, are all hugely complicated and require asking men for permission, time, money and help” (para 1).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1, ERBG-PRACTICE-2, ASR-PRACTICE-2, ASR-LAW-2

“Simple tasks like buying a cell phone, registering children for school, applying for a job, getting a bank account, are all hugely complicated and require asking men for permission, time, money and help. Forget any sports in public” (para 1).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DV-LAW-1

“So, it also comes as no surprise that in Saudi Arabia, neither domestic violence nor spousal rape are prohibited by law” (para 3). “Two weeks ago, Wajeha Al-Huweidar and Fawzia Al-Oyouni, two Saudi activists, were sentenced to 10 months in prison and a two-year travel restriction for ‘corrupting’ Nathalie Morin, a Canadian national who has been trying to leave Saudi Arabia, for the past several years. . . The two women were arrested outside of Morin’s house, carrying food supplies, after they received a panicked text from her saying that her husband had locked her and their three children in their house with not enough food and water. He’d left...more
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

“Two weeks ago, Wajeha Al-Huweidar and Fawzia Al-Oyouni, two Saudi activists, were sentenced to 10 months in prison and a two-year travel restriction for ‘corrupting’ Nathalie Morin, a Canadian national who has been trying to leave Saudi Arabia, for the past several years. . . The two women were arrested outside of Morin’s house, carrying food supplies, after they received a panicked text from her saying that her husband had locked her and their three children in their house with not enough food and water. He’d left for a week. The trial took a year and Morin, who has never met either woman, was not allowed to testify. While these...more
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

“So, it also comes as no surprise that in Saudi Arabia, neither domestic violence nor spousal rape are prohibited by law” (para 3).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: ATC-DATA-1

“Saudi Arabia and Canada are both ratified signatories to CEDAW (the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women), which calls for the equal protection of women’s fundamental rights and freedoms, including speech, expression, movement and association” (para 12).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

“Two weeks ago, there was a meeting on “women in society“ in Saudi Arabia that involved, not surprising but still shocking, no women. As one Twitter wag noted, at least some men wore pink” (para 1). “This year, for the first time ever, Saudi Arabia launched a landmark campaign to raise awareness of domestic violence (which used the off-putting hashtag #hither); and two women competed as part of the Saudi Team in the 2011 Olympics” (para 11).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

“However, female citizens, a term I use only in the loosest sense, are electronically tagged for travel outside of the country” (para 1).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1, RCDW-LAW-2, SRACE-PRACTICE-2

“This year, in a move with interesting echoes of our own history, Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bicycles, fully covered and in the presence of a male relative, in some public spaces” (para 1).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-LAW-1

“Women in that country cannot go to school, cannot vote, go shopping or otherwise engage in the public sphere without the permission of a man. This year, in a move with interesting echoes of our own history, Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bicycles, fully covered and in the presence of a male relative, in some public space. However, female citizens, a term I use only in the loosest sense, are electronically tagged for travel outside of the country. Male guardianship, not mandated by law, is pervasively institutionalized and defines women’s isolation, dependence and constrained and stressful everyday existences.” (para 1). “Since the 1990s, a recurring flashpoint in women’s...more
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SRACE-LAW-1

“Simple tasks like buying a cell phone, registering children for school, applying for a job, getting a bank account, are all hugely complicated and require asking men for permission, time, money and help. Forget any sports in public. This year, in a move with interesting echoes of our own history, Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bicycles, fully covered and in the presence of a male relative, in some public spaces” (para 1).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: VOTE-LAW-1, AFE-PRACTICE-3, AFE-LAW-1

“Women in that country cannot go to school, cannot vote, go shopping or otherwise engage in the public sphere without the permission of a man” (para 1).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1, WAM-LAW-1

“Two weeks ago, Wajeha Al-Huweidar and Fawzia Al-Oyouni, two Saudi activists, were sentenced to 10 months in prison and a two-year travel restriction for ‘corrupting’ Nathalie Morin, a Canadian national who has been trying to leave Saudi Arabia, for the past several years. Al-Huweidar and al-Oyouni gained, along with others, international visibility when they openly violated their country’s ban against women driving in 2011. Huweidar’s personal experience attests to the driving ban’s real and daily impact. When her mother developed a heart condition, Huweidar had to wait during critically important hours until a man could drive her to the city where her mother lived. A prominent and tireless activist, she...more
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: SRACE-PRACTICE-1

“Simple tasks like buying a cell phone, registering children for school, applying for a job, getting a bank account, are all hugely complicated and require asking men for permission, time, money and help. Forget any sports in public” (para 1). “This year, for the first time ever, Saudi Arabia launched a landmark campaign to raise awareness of domestic violence (which used the off-putting hashtag #hither); and two women competed as part of the Saudi Team in the 2011 Olympics” (para 11).
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Women in that country cannot go to school, cannot vote, go shopping or otherwise engage in the public sphere without the permission of a man. . . This year, in a move with interesting echoes of our own history, Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bicycles, fully covered and in the presence of a male relative, in some public space. However, female citizens, a term I use only in the loosest sense, are electronically tagged for travel outside of the country. Male guardianship, not mandated by law, is pervasively institutionalized and defines women’s isolation, dependence and constrained and stressful everyday existences” (para 1). “Since the 1990s, a recurring flashpoint...more
Aug. 10, 2020, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DV-LAW-2

“Two weeks ago, Wajeha Al-Huweidar and Fawzia Al-Oyouni, two Saudi activists, were sentenced to 10 months in prison and a two-year travel restriction for ‘corrupting’ Nathalie Morin, a Canadian national who has been trying to leave Saudi Arabia, for the past several years. . . The two women were arrested outside of Morin’s house, carrying food supplies, after they received a panicked text from her saying that her husband had locked her and their three children in their house with not enough food and water. He’d left for a week. The trial took a year and Morin, who has never met either woman, was not allowed to testify. While these...more
Aug. 2, 2020, 5:17 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2, CWC-DATA-4

"Migrant domestic workers, predominantly women, faced a range of abuses including overwork, forced confinement, non-payment of wages, food deprivation, and psychological, physical, and sexual abuse for which there was little redress" (para 29).
Aug. 2, 2020, 5:17 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Amid the criticism, Saudi authorities announced landmark reforms for Saudi women that, if fully implemented, represent a significant step forward including allowing Saudi women to obtain passports and travel abroad without the approval of a male relative for the first time" (para 2). "Most of the women faced charges that were solely related to peaceful human rights work, including...calling for an end to Saudi Arabia's discriminatory male guardianship system" (para 8). "In late July, Saudi Arabia's Council of Ministers promulgated landmark amendments to the three laws that will begin to dismantle the country's discriminatory male guardianship system" (para 19). "This major advance should make it illegal for private employers to...more