The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Senegal

Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Belgium, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Finland, Mexico, Namibia, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Spain, Sweden
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

0.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Comoros, East Timor, Egypt, Fiji, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Moldova, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

2.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-3

"The law provided alternatives to the removal of foreign victims who may face hardship or retribution upon return, including the option to apply for temporary or permanent residency; the government did not report how many victims received this relief during the reporting period. The 2005 anti-trafficking law has provisions for victim protection during prosecution including allowing video-taped testimony; the government did not report implementing these provisions during the reporting period. Victims could legally obtain restitution and file civil suits against their traffickers; the government reported seeking restitution in all cases prosecuted during the reporting period" (415).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Senegal’s 2005 Law to Combat Trafficking in Persons and Related Practices and to Protect Victims criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking. The law prescribed penalties of five to 10 years’ imprisonment and a fine for sex trafficking and labor trafficking—except forced begging—and prescribed lesser penalties of two to five years’ imprisonment and a fine for forced begging. These penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with regards to sex trafficking, commensurate with penalties prescribed for other serious crimes, such as rape. While the 2005 anti-trafficking law criminalized forced begging, provisions in the penal code that allowed seeking of alms under certain conditions may have hampered law enforcement officials’ ability to distinguish traditional...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The law provided alternatives to the removal of foreign victims who may face hardship or retribution upon return, including the option to apply for temporary or permanent residency; the government did not report how many victims received this relief during the reporting period. The 2005 anti-trafficking law has provisions for victim protection during prosecution including allowing video-taped testimony; the government did not report implementing these provisions during the reporting period. Victims could legally obtain restitution and file civil suits against their traffickers; the government reported seeking restitution in all cases prosecuted during the reporting period" (415).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Senegal, and traffickers exploit victims from Senegal abroad. Forced begging is the most prevalent form of trafficking; some Quranic teachers and men who claim to be Quranic teachers force children to beg in Dakar and other major cities in Senegal (...) Traffickers subject Senegalese boys and girls to domestic servitude, forced labor in gold mines, and sex trafficking. Internal trafficking is more prevalent than transnational trafficking (...) Traffickers exploit Senegalese women and girls in domestic servitude in neighboring countries, Europe, and the Middle East, including Egypt. Reports indicate traffickers exploit most Senegalese sex trafficking victims...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Senegal does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts to meet the minimum standards compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Senegal was upgraded to Tier 2. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts by convicting six individuals involved in trafficking, including three traffickers posing as Quranic teachers who exploited children in forced begging under the 2005 antitrafficking law; only three individuals had been convicted for forced begging since 2005. The government sentenced two of the three traffickers convicted for forced child begging to significant prison terms. The government identified...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"The government, at times in collaboration with NGOs, identified and referred to services at least nine adult trafficking victims and approximately 1,559 potential child trafficking victims during the reporting period—including a significant number of child forced begging victims. This was compared to identifying and providing services to 1,381 potential child trafficking victims during the previous reporting period. The MGGCP partnered with NGOs to repatriate at least 296 child trafficking victims to their home countries. A second NGO in Saint-Louis identified and cared for an additional 340 child trafficking victims without government support" (414).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2, ERBG-DATA-5

"Women represent 52 percent of the population, but they perform 90 percent of domestic work and 85 percent of agricultural work" (page 24).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: GIC-LAW-1, GIC-LAW-3

"The code considers men to be heads of household, preventing women from taking legal responsibility for their children. In addition, any childhood benefits are paid to the father" (page 16).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: ISSA-PRACTICE-1

"Infanticide, usually due to poverty or embarrassment, continued to be a problem. In some cases, women’s families shamed them into killing their babies. Domestic workers and rural women working in cities sometimes killed their newborns if they could not care for them. Others, married to men working outside the country, killed their infants out of shame. According to the African Assembly for the Defense of Human Rights, infanticide also occurred when a woman became pregnant with the child of a man from a prohibited occupational caste" (page 18).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"The law prohibits rape, which is punishable by five to 10 years’ imprisonment. Nevertheless, the government rarely enforced the law, and rape was widespread. The law does not address spousal rape. The law allows the common practice of using a woman’s sexual history to defend men accused of rape. The law criminalizes assaults and provides for punishment of one to five years in prison and a fine" (page 14-15). "The law provides that convicted sexual abusers of children receive five to 10 years’ imprisonment. If the offender is a family member, the maximum is applied" (page 18).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"The law prohibits rape, which is punishable by five to 10 years’ imprisonment. Nevertheless, the government rarely enforced the law, and rape was widespread . . . NGOs also criticized the government’s failure to permit associations to bring suits on behalf of victims and the lack of shield laws for rape . . . The Ministry of Justice is responsible for combating domestic violence, but did not made public any programs to address rape and domestic violence" (page 14-15).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

"The law provides for the same legal status and rights for women as for men. Nevertheless, women faced pervasive discrimination, especially in rural areas where traditional customs and discriminatory rules of inheritance, were strongest" (page 15-16). "While women legally have equal access to land, traditional practices made it difficult for women to purchase property in rural areas. Many women had access to land only through their husbands, and the security of their rights depended on maintaining the relationship with their husbands. In addition rural councils--where women often were underrepresented--allocated most land" (page 16). "According to women’s rights groups and officials from the Ministry of Women, Family, and Childhood, child marriage...more
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: ISSA-DATA-2

"Women represent 52 percent of the population" (page 24).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: LBHO-LAW-2

"In 2010 the government passed a gender parity law requiring the candidate lists of political parties to contain equal numbers of men and women for elected positions at all levels, from city councils to the National Assembly" (page 12-13).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"The actual incidence of domestic violence, which many citizens considered a normal part of life, was thought to be much higher than the number of cases reported" (page 15).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: FSCB-PRACTICE-1

"There were no reports of coerced abortion, involuntary sterilization, or other coercive population control methods" (page 15).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"Girls encountered greater difficulties in continuing in school beyond the elementary level. Sexual harassment by school staff and early pregnancy also caused the departure of girls from school. Many parents opted to keep their middle- and high-school-aged daughters home to work or to marry rather than sending them to school, where predatory teachers could ruin their reputations and future marriage prospects" (page 16-17).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: ISSA-DATA-1

"According to a 2015 UN report, approximately 16 percent of women in detention in 2013 were imprisoned for infanticide. Moreover, infanticide represented 64 percent of the grounds for imprisonment of girls ages 13 to 18, according to the UN report" (page 18-19).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"The law does not address spousal rape" (page 14).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Girls encountered greater difficulties in continuing in school beyond the elementary level. Sexual harassment by school staff and early pregnancy also caused the departure of girls from school. Many parents opted to keep their middle- and high-school-aged daughters home to work or to marry rather than sending them to school, where predatory teachers could ruin their reputations and future marriage prospects. In recent years, however, there has been significant progress in reducing gender disparity at the middle- and high-school level" (page 16-17).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: CWC-DATA-3

"During the 35-year Casamance conflict, thousands of persons left villages in the region due to fighting, forced removal, and land mines. Some international humanitarian assistance agencies estimated the number could be as high as 20,000. During the year IDPs continued to return to their villages. The law provides for the granting of asylum or refugee status, and the government has established a system for providing protection to refugees. Since the president must approve each case, delays of one to two years in granting refugee status remained a problem. The government generally granted refugee status or asylum and provided refugees with food and nonfood assistance in coordination with UNHCR and NGOs....more
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-1

"Procuring a minor for prostitution is punishable by imprisonment for two to five years and a fine of 300,000 to four million CFA francs ($551 to $7,352). If the crime involves a victim younger than 13, the maximum penalty is applied. The law was not effectively enforced, but when cases were referred to law enforcement, authorities conducted follow-up investigations" (page 18). "The law prohibits all forms of forced or compulsory labor" (page 22).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: VOTE-DATA-2

"Approximately 53 percent of voters cast ballots, a significant increase from the 36 percent who cast ballots in the previous legislative election in 2012" (page 12).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Citizenship is acquired by birth or naturalization. In 2013 the government passed legislation which provides for equal rights for mothers and fathers automatically to transmit citizenship to their children. The law does not make birth declaration mandatory" (page 16).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: ISTD-PRACTICE-1

"The law prohibits all forms of discrimination against persons with HIV/AIDS, and the government and NGOs conducted HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns to increase social acceptance of persons with HIV or AIDS. Nevertheless, human rights activists reported HIV-positive individuals and those with AIDS suffered from social stigma due to the widespread belief that such status indicated homosexuality. HIV-positive men sometimes refrained from taking antiretroviral drugs due to fear their families would discover their sexual orientation" (page 21).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: PRN-LAW-1

"Pornography is prohibited, and pornography involving children under age 16 is considered pedophilia and punishable by up to two years’ imprisonment and fines of up to 300,000 CFA francs ($551)" (page 18).
July 8, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"The government-run Ginddi Center in Dakar provided shelter to women and girls who were survivors of rape or early and forced marriage, and to street children" (page 15).