The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for South Korea

Jan. 19, 2018, 6:30 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ABO-LAW-1

"Abortion is illegal in South Korea with just a few exceptions, such as when a woman has been raped or her health is at risk. It is one of just a handful of the world’s richest countries to have such restrictive abortion laws. Women can be sentenced to a year in prison or ordered to pay fines of two million won (about $1,840) for having abortions, while doctors who perform them can get up to two years in prison" (para 4). "Even in the limited instances when an abortion is legal, a woman must get permission from her spouse or cohabiting partner" (para 11). "In 1973, the government revised the ...more
Jan. 19, 2018, 6:30 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"But abortion rights advocates say the law does little to deter abortions in a culture where birth control is not widely embraced. Many women are not aware of contraception options like the birth control pill or IUD, and even a recent proposal by the Education Ministry for a new sex education curriculum recommended the withdrawal method as a primary way to avoid pregnancy" (para 34).
Jan. 19, 2018, 6:30 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ABO-DATA-1

"According to a government estimate, based on a survey of women of childbearing age, 169,000 abortions were conducted in 2010. That number, which represents close to 16 abortions per 1,000 people, gives South Korea the 10th highest abortion rate among the 35 mostly high-income countries that are members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. But independent analysis by public health scholars suggests that the real number is much higher. According to research by Park Myung-bae, a professor at Pai Chai University in the city of Daejeon, the annual tally is as high as 500,000 or more — greater than the number of babies born in South Korea in ...more
Jan. 19, 2018, 6:30 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ABO-PRACTICE-1

"Ms. Lee went to a hospital and had an abortion. But as a graduate of a Catholic high school where she had been shown graphic videos portraying abortion as murder, she felt scared and tormented by guilt" (para 2). "Last fall, more than 230,000 people signed an online petition submitted to the presidential office, known as the Blue House, calling for abortion to be legalized. The activists are seeking to bring the law closer to the current reality. The ban on abortion is rarely enforced, and it is relatively easy for women to find willing doctors at clinics" (para 6-7). "And few women or doctors are prosecuted for abortion. Last ...more
Jan. 19, 2018, 6:30 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: GIC-LAW-1

"In the 1970s and 1980s, as South Korea’s population grew rapidly, the government mounted a campaign to control the birthrate, issuing propaganda posters with slogans like 'It’s too crowded in Korea' and 'Even two is too much'" (para 22).
Jan. 17, 2018, 4:25 p.m.
Countries: Belgium, Finland, France, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, South Africa, South Korea
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-1

"The positive direct and normative effects of this legislation have inspired other countries in the European Union and beyond to implement similar laws e.g. Norway and Iceland (2009), South Africa (2007), and South Korea (2003). Consultations on whether to pass legislation that prohibits the purchase of a sexual act or service are presently under way in e.g. France, Belgium, The Republic of Ireland, Finland, Scotland, and Northern Ireland" (page 3).
Dec. 6, 2017, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

According to Table 2, in 2007, for those ages 15 and older, 8.5% of those employed in agriculture were women, 15.3% of those employed in industry were women, and 76.2% of those employed in services were women (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2

According to Table 2, in 2007, for those ages 15 and older, 8.5% of those employed in agriculture were women, 15.3% of those employed in industry were women, and 76.2% of those employed in services were women (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 5:42 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-DATA-5

According to Table 2, in 2007, for those ages 15 and older, 8.5% of those employed in agriculture were women, 15.3% of those employed in industry were women, and 76.2% of those employed in services were women (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 5:42 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

According to Table 2, in 2007, for those ages 15 and older, 8.5% of those employed in agriculture were women, 15.3% of those employed in industry were women, and 76.2% of those employed in services were women (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 5 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-DATA-5

According to Figure 5, about 54% of economically active women are employed by the agricultural sector, about 16% by the industry sector, and about 30% by the services sector (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 4:59 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

According to Figure 5, about 54% of economically active women are employed by the agricultural sector, about 16% by the industry sector, and about 30% by the services sector (ENB-Coder Comment)
Nov. 30, 2017, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

According to AgeOfConsent's data, the legal age of consent is 20 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:43 p.m.
Countries: Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand
Variables: LDS-DATA-1

"While precise data are lacking, UNRISD estimates that by 2002 there were at least 1.3 million foreign women working in the major labor-importing countries in East and Southeast Asia, including Japan, the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. These women constituted a high proportion of the total immigrant labor force in some of these countries (UNRISD 2005, p.115)"(23)
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:41 p.m.
Countries: Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-1

"While precise data are lacking, UNRISD estimates that by 2002 there were at least 1.3 million foreign women working in the major labor-importing countries in East and Southeast Asia, including Japan, the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. These women constituted a high proportion of the total immigrant labor force in some of these countries (UNRISD 2005, p.115)"(23)
Nov. 29, 2017, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2

"A global survey in 2005 found that almost 40% of those interviewed agreed that when jobs are scarce, men have more right to a job (Seguino 2009).3 Thus, women were laid off at 7 times the rate of men in the Republic of Korea as a result of the 1997–1999 crisis (Seguino 2009)"(15)
Nov. 29, 2017, 3:48 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

"A global survey in 2005 found that almost 40% of those interviewed agreed that when jobs are scarce, men have more right to a job (Seguino 2009).3 Thus, women were laid off at 7 times the rate of men in the Republic of Korea as a result of the 1997–1999 crisis (Seguino 2009)"(15)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:57 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)."If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea"(3)."A major cause of the persistence of existing gender roles is that many men in the formal sector work long hours, providing at least a partial explanation of why they are not assuming a greater share of family responsibilities. ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:52 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)"If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea"(3)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:49 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)."If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea"(3)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea, and 182% of the total tax revenue of India"(3-4)."A major cause of the persistence of existing gender roles is that many men ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"ROK government and media reports noted that the DPRK also kidnapped other foreign nationals from locations abroad in the 1970s and 1980s. The DPRK continued to deny its involvement in the kidnappings. The ROK Ministry of Unification reported that an estimated 517 of its civilians, abducted or detained by DPRK authorities since the end of the Korean War, remained in the DPRK. South Korean NGOs estimated that during the Korean War the DPRK abducted 20,000 civilians who remained in the North or who have died"(2)
Sept. 25, 2017, 8:22 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-6

6.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: LO-SCALE-1

1.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: AFE-SCALE-1

0.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DACH-SCALE-1

0.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DACH-SCALE-1

0.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: BR-SCALE-1

0.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DACH-SCALE-2

1.0
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-4

5.0