The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for South Sudan

June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-3

"The practice of girl compensation--compensating the family of a crime victim with a girl from the perpetrator’s family--occurred. Victims were generally between ages 11 and 15, did not attend school, and often were physically and sexually abused and used as servants by their captors. Local officials complained that the absence of security and rule of law in many areas impeded efforts to curb the practice" (Pg 36).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: MMR-PRACTICE-1, MMR-DATA-1

"The most recent maternal mortality rate estimate was 2,054 deaths per 100,000 live births, and a woman’s lifetime risk of maternal death was one in seven. The lack of access to skilled medical care during pregnancy and childbirth resulted in maternal death and disability from treatable conditions, such as infection, hemorrhage, and obstructed birth" (Pg 36).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"Women held 87 of the 296 filled seats in the NLA but occupied only six of the 50 seats in the Council of States. The government did not meet the 25 percent representation requirement for women at the state level. No women were selected for posts during the president’s December round of caretaker governor appointments. The governor of Warrap State, the only female governor, was relieved of her duties. Four women served in the 21-member cabinet, and five of 12 deputy ministers were women" (Pg 30).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LRW-LAW-1, LRW-LAW-2, LRCM-LAW-1

"Rape is punishable by up to 14 years’ imprisonment and a fine. The government did not effectively enforce the law, and rape was thought to be widespread. The law defines sexual intercourse within marriage as 'not rape.' No information was available on the number of persons prosecuted, convicted, or punished for rape, and convictions of rape seldom were publicized. According to observers, sentences for persons convicted of rape were often less than the maximum" (Pg 35).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"Women also experienced discrimination in employment, pay, credit, education, inheritance, housing, and ownership and management of businesses or land. Although women have the right to own property and land under the transitional constitution, community elders often sought to prevent women from exercising these rights because they contradict customary practice, and the deceased husband’s family often usurped land. Traditional beliefs tended to discourage women from assuming leadership positions because of the belief this undermined fulfillment of domestic duties" (Pg 37). "Discrimination occurred on the basis of all the enumerated categories. Discrimination in employment and occupation occurred with respect to hiring practices with particular ethnic groups such as the Murles, who were...more
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"The transitional constitution and the 2012 Education Act provide for tuition-free, compulsory basic education through grade eight" (Pg 37).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The transitional constitution prohibits discrimination based on race, gender, disability, language, and social status. The government did not effectively enforce the prohibitions. In October the Council of Ministers recommended that the NLA ratify a pan-African youth convention but with specific reservations one government official described as 'encouraging' lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) individuals or activities" (Pg 35). "While the transitional constitution provides for gender equality and equal rights for women, deep cultural prejudices resulted in widespread discrimination against women" (Pg 36).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LRW-LAW-4, MARR-LAW-1, AOM-PRACTICE-1, AOM-LAW-1, AOM-DATA-2

"The law provides that every child has the right to protection from early marriage but does not explicitly prohibit marriage before age 18. Child marriage was common. According to the Ministry of Gender, nearly half of all girls and young women between the ages of 15 and 19 were married, and some brides were as young as 12 years old. Early marriage sometimes reflected efforts by men to avoid rape charges, which a married woman cannot bring against her husband. In other cases families of rape victims encouraged marriage to the rapist to avoid public shaming. Many abducted girls, often repeatedly subjected to rape (see section 1.g.), were forced into...more
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2, DACH-DATA-2

"At the same time, the country has a modern contraceptive prevalence rate of only 1.5 percent among girls and women of reproductive age. The practice of dowry further limited some reproductive choices, since men who paid dowries to marry believed they had the final say in domestic decisions. High illiteracy rates among women limited their access to accurate information concerning the right to control their fertility. While couples were not subject to governmental coercion in deciding the number, spacing, and timing of children, or managing their reproductive health, few had access to accurate information, modern contraceptive methods, or family planning services" (Pg 36).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-1

"In April the SPLA began a brutal offensive across the region of Greater Upper Nile lasting several months. The most common pattern involved fighting between government and opposition forces followed by reprisals against civilians. Human rights organizations reported rampant human rights violations against civilians including torture, rape, burning of victims alive, crushing victims under tanks, and wholesale destruction of villages. In May satellite imagery supported the claim that during the offensive the SPLA sent bulldozers to demolish entire villages" (Pg 14). "Government, opposition forces, and armed militias affiliated with the government and the opposition tortured, raped, and otherwise abused civilians in conflict areas. In October the head of delegation of...more
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-3

"The law does not prohibit domestic violence. Violence against women, including spousal abuse, was common, although there were no reliable statistics on its prevalence. Women were often reluctant to file a formal complaint, and police seldom intervened in domestic disputes. According to NGOs some women reported that police tried to charge them SSP 20 (seven dollars) when they attempted to file the criminal complaint of rape or abuse. While the official form is not mandatory, police often told women they needed to complete it prior to receiving medical treatment. Statistics were not available on the number of abusers prosecuted, convicted, or punished. Families of rape victims encouraged marriage to the...more
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"Rape is punishable by up to 14 years’ imprisonment and a fine. The government did not effectively enforce the law, and rape was thought to be widespread. The law defines sexual intercourse within marriage as 'not rape.' No information was available on the number of persons prosecuted, convicted, or punished for rape, and convictions of rape seldom were publicized. According to observers, sentences for persons convicted of rape were often less than the maximum" (Pg 35). "The law does not prohibit domestic violence. Violence against women, including spousal abuse, was common, although there were no reliable statistics on its prevalence. Women were often reluctant to file a formal complaint, and...more
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"High illiteracy rates also impeded women’s ability to understand and defend their rights" (Pg 36). "Women also experienced discrimination in employment, pay, credit, education, inheritance, housing, and ownership and management of businesses or land. Although women have the right to own property and land under the transitional constitution, community elders often sought to prevent women from exercising these rights because they contradict customary practice, and the deceased husband’s family often usurped land. Traditional beliefs tended to discourage women from assuming leadership positions because of the belief this undermined fulfillment of domestic duties" (Pg 37). "Girls often did not have equal access to education. Many girls did not attend school or...more
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LBHO-LAW-2

"The transitional constitution requires at least 25 percent female participation in the legislative and executive branches of government at the national and state levels" (Pg 30).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2, DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-2, DV-LAW-1

"The law does not prohibit domestic violence. Violence against women, including spousal abuse, was common, although there were no reliable statistics on its prevalence. Women were often reluctant to file a formal complaint, and police seldom intervened in domestic disputes. According to NGOs some women reported that police tried to charge them SSP 20 (seven dollars) when they attempted to file the criminal complaint of rape or abuse. While the official form is not mandatory, police often told women they needed to complete it prior to receiving medical treatment. Statistics were not available on the number of abusers prosecuted, convicted, or punished. Families of rape victims encouraged marriage to the...more
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1, INFIB-LAW-1, SEGI-PRACTICE-1, NGOFW-DATA-1

"FGM/C is a criminal offense under the penal code, but little data existed to determine its prevalence. The law prohibits subjecting children to negative and harmful practices that affect their health, welfare, and dignity. Although not a common practice, FGM/C occurred in some regions, particularly along the northern border regions in Muslim communities. Several NGOs worked to end FGM/C, and the Ministry of Gender raised awareness of the dangers of FGM/C through local radio broadcasts" (Pg 35).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

"Women also experienced discrimination in employment, pay, credit, education, inheritance, housing, and ownership and management of businesses or land. Although women have the right to own property and land under the transitional constitution, community elders often sought to prevent women from exercising these rights because they contradict customary practice, and the deceased husband’s family often usurped land. Traditional beliefs tended to discourage women from assuming leadership positions because of the belief this undermined fulfillment of domestic duties" (Pg 37).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Child abuse, including sexual abuse, was reportedly widespread. Child rape occurred frequently in the context of child marriage and within the commercial sex industry in urban centers" (Pg 38). "The law provides that every child has the right to protection from early marriage but does not explicitly prohibit marriage before age 18. Child marriage was common. According to the Ministry of Gender, nearly half of all girls and young women between the ages of 15 and 19 were married, and some brides were as young as 12 years old. Early marriage sometimes reflected efforts by men to avoid rape charges, which a married woman cannot bring against her husband. In...more
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: LR-DATA-1

"High illiteracy rates also impeded women’s ability to understand and defend their rights" (Pg 36).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: GP-DATA-6

"These laws were inconsistently implemented at both the state and national levels. While women have made gains in both the NLA and in the executive branch (see below), they remained marginalized in the judiciary, local governments, and among traditional leaders. Representation was particularly poor at the local level, where implementation of the 2009 act’s provisions was particularly wanting. The current system also devolved substantial candidate selection power to political party leaders, very few of whom were women" (Pg 30).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-3

"Women tended to be discouraged from assuming leadership positions because of the belief such activities conflicted with their domestic duties" (Pg 30). "Women also experienced discrimination in employment, pay, credit, education, inheritance, housing, and ownership and management of businesses or land. Although women have the right to own property and land under the transitional constitution, community elders often sought to prevent women from exercising these rights because they contradict customary practice, and the deceased husband’s family often usurped land. Traditional beliefs tended to discourage women from assuming leadership positions because of the belief this undermined fulfillment of domestic duties" (Pg 37).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"These laws were inconsistently implemented at both the state and national levels. While women have made gains in both the NLA and in the executive branch (see below), they remained marginalized in the judiciary, local governments, and among traditional leaders. Representation was particularly poor at the local level, where implementation of the 2009 act’s provisions was particularly wanting. The current system also devolved substantial candidate selection power to political party leaders, very few of whom were women. Women held 87 of the 296 filled seats in the NLA but occupied only six of the 50 seats in the Council of States. The government did not meet the 25 percent representation...more
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: MARR-LAW-4, CUST-LAW-1

"Despite statutory law to the contrary, under customary law a divorce is not final until the wife and her family return the full dowry to the husband’s family. As a result, families often dissuaded women from divorce. Traditional courts usually ruled in favor of the husband’s family in most cases of child custody, unless children were between three and seven years of age" (Pg 37).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: ATDW-PRACTICE-1

Despite statutory law to the contrary, under customary law a divorce is not final until the wife and her family return the full dowry to the husband’s family. As a result, families often dissuaded women from divorce. Traditional courts usually ruled in favor of the husband’s family in most cases of child custody, unless children were between three and seven years of age" (Pg 37).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: CWC-DATA-3

"IDPs suffered significant abuses, such as armed attacks, killings, ethnically targeted violence, arbitrary detention, gender-based violence, and recruitment of child soldiers. Both government and opposition forces targeted IDPs. Outside the major UN-operated PoC sites, IDP settlements were collocated with armed elements, and IDPs reported abuse by these elements" (Pg 26). "Refugees sometimes suffered abuse, such as armed attacks, killings, gender-based violence, forced recruitment, including of children, and forced labor, according to UNHCR" (Pg 27).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"The law does not prohibit discrimination with respect to employment or occupation on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, political opinion, national origin or citizenship, social origin, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity, age, language, HIV-positive status, or on any other basis" (Pg 44).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2, IIP-LAW-2

"Sexual harassment is punishable by up to three years imprisonment and a fine. The government rarely enforced the law, and NGOs reported that most women were unaware that it was a punishable offense. Although no statistics were available, observers noted that sexual harassment, particularly by military and police, was a serious problem throughout the country" (Pg 36).
June 28, 2019, 8:55 a.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Girls often did not have equal access to education. Many girls did not attend school or dropped out of school due to early marriage, domestic duties, and fear of gender-based violence at school. According to the 2015 Education for All national review, girls comprised only 39 percent of primary school students and 32 percent of secondary school students, although this figure may be even lower due to continuing violence and displacement as a result of the conflict. Only approximately 12 percent of teachers were women, according to World Bank and UNESCO reports, and in many communities it was not acceptable to send girls into a male-dominated public space" (Pg 37-38).more
May 15, 2019, 6:51 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cameroon, Chad, Congo, East Timor, Egypt, Eritrea, Fiji, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Israel, Jordan, Kosovo, Laos, Lesotho, Macedonia, Maldives, Mali, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Serbia, Singapore, Slovenia, Somalia, South Korea, South Sudan, Taiwan, Ukraine
Variables: GP-SCALE-1

2.0
May 14, 2019, 2:38 p.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: AOM-DATA-2

An Image between paragraphs 12-13 posted in the article, elaborated by Girls not Brides, shows the following child marriage rates: Acoording to UNICEF-2017, 9% of women were married by 15 and 52% of girls were married by 18. South Sudan is ranked 5 on an international ranking.