The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Sri Lanka

Dec. 20, 2017, 7:54 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"Not only are Sri Lanka Muslim women subject to personal laws that deny usequality in an integral aspect of our lives--marriage and family, but there are also no constitutional guarantees and safegaurds of our fundamental rights of equality and non-discrimination" (para 2). "But the legal discrimination do not end there. Since 1978, Article 16(1) of our Constitution has prevented those affected by the MMDA-women and men-from being able to seek redress against discriminatory aspects of the law and has rendered Muslims less than equal as citizens. In other words, if our rights were in any violated by said personal laws to which we are compelled to abide by should we ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:54 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"Not only are Sri Lanka Muslim women subject to personal laws that deny usequality in an integral aspect of our lives--marriage and family, but there are also no constitutional guarantees and safegaurds of our fundamental rights of equality and non-discrimination" (para 2). "The events and widespread discussions of the past few months around the Muslim Marriage and Divorce Act (MMDA) of 1951, has made it clear that the status quo with respect to MMDA is untenable. There are also serious consequences of these shortcomings in creating a culture of discrimination that has adversly impacted on the rights and wellbeing of women and girls within the Muslim community. The struggle of ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:54 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"In November, we completed 'unequal citizens: Muslim women's struggle for justice and equality in Sri Lanka'--a one-year study that sought answers as to why the reforms to the Muslim Marriage and divorce Act (MMDA) was many decades overdue. In light of the constitutional reforms process, the study also led to the inquiry about whether or not as a result of our religious affiliation and gender--we and our sisters in faith were equal before the law, as others. The answer, as we found out is a resounding 'no', and the reasons are many" (para 1). "The events and widespread discussions of the past few months around the Muslim Marriage and Divorce ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:48 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"In an alarming submission made to several parliamentarians and other conservative groups with regard to proposed amendments to the muslim marriage and Divorce act (MMDA), the All Ceylon Jamiyathul Ulama (ACJU) has said that they agree with the Hadith 'No people will ever prosper who appoint a woman in charge of their affairs' and therefore a woman isn't worthy of being appointed a Qazi (judge)" (Para 1).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:48 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"In a brief document dated March 2017 of which colombo Telegraph possesses a copy, the clerics have said that therefore they oppose the appointing of female judges (Qazis)" (Para 3). "The ACJU accordingly has made a sweeping conclusion saying they are against any female judge sitting in as a Qazi and that her edicts will be not binding as per the sharia and will therefore be null and void. Instead the ACJU has sought to confine the female in a consultative capacity" (Para 10).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:48 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"In an alarming submission made to several parliamentarians and other conservative groups with regard to proposed amendments to the muslim marriage and Divorce act (MMDA), the All Ceylon Jamiyathul Ulama (ACJU) has said that they agree with the Hadith 'No people will ever prosper who appoint a woman in charge of their affairs' and therefore a woman isn't worthy of being appointed a Qazi (judge)" (Para 1). "Several organizations including Muslim led civil society groups and the media have highlighted and documented many issues of rural Muslim women suffering as a result of the MMDA, including many instances of child marriage" (Para 13).
Dec. 20, 2017, 7:48 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"Several organizations including Muslim led civil society groups and the media have highlighted and documented many issues of rural Muslim women suffering as a result of the MMDA, including many instances of child marriage" (Para 13).
Dec. 6, 2017, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

According to Table 2, in 2007, for those age 10 and older, 36.8% of those employed in agriculture were women, 27.1% of those employed in industry were women, and 25.6% of those employed in services were women (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2

According to Table 2, in 2007, for those age 10 and older, 36.8% of those employed in agriculture were women, 27.1% of those employed in industry were women, and 25.6% of those employed in services were women (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 5:42 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-DATA-5

According to Table 2, in 2007, for those age 10 and older, 36.8% of those employed in agriculture were women, 27.1% of those employed in industry were women, and 25.6% of those employed in services were women (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 5:42 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

According to Table 2, in 2007, for those age 10 and older, 36.8% of those employed in agriculture were women, 27.1% of those employed in industry were women, and 25.6% of those employed in services were women (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 5 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-DATA-5

According to Figure 5, about 37% of economically active women are employed by the agriculture sector, about 27% by the industry sector, and about 26% by the services sector (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 6, 2017, 4:59 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

According to Figure 5, about 37% of economically active women are employed by the agriculture sector, about 27% by the industry sector, and about 26% by the services sector (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 5, 2017, 10:17 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The opportunity cost of women’s time rises due to their employment, affecting food consumption patterns and causing a shift to time-saving foods—especially commercially baked breads, as documented in Sri Lanka (Senauer, Sahn, and Alderman 1986)"(70)
Nov. 30, 2017, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Botswana, Brunei, Cameroon, Canada, Cuba, Fiji, Finland, Georgia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lesotho, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Mauritania, Moldova, Mongolia, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Russia, Senegal, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

According to AgeOfConsent's data, the legal age of consent is 16 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:29 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"In countries such as Malaysia and Sri Lanka, young women in particular out-migrate to urban centers to work at transnational production sites or free trade zones. Well-documented tensions are often created between the traditional values of the peasant society from which the women originate and the values at industrial sites where they work (Ong 1987)"(22)."Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999). ...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 9:55 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2

"While women tend to be the first to lose their jobs in an economic slowdown, heightened competition during such episodes may result in wage cuts and extended work hours for those remaining employed (Chhibber, Ghosh, and Palanivel 2009). Recent developments confirm this trend in the garment industry in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, in electronics factories in Thailand and the Philippines, and in a range of exporting sectors in India (Ghosh 2009)"(15)
Nov. 29, 2017, 9:53 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

"While women tend to be the first to lose their jobs in an economic slowdown, heightened competition during such episodes may result in wage cuts and extended work hours for those remaining employed (Chhibber, Ghosh, and Palanivel 2009). Recent developments confirm this trend in the garment industry in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, in electronics factories in Thailand and the Philippines, and in a range of exporting sectors in India (Ghosh 2009)"(15)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

"Indeed, while sub-Saharan African countries consistently rank lower than South Asian countries in Human Development Index (HDI) indicators, women- and child-specific nutrition indicators—such as infants born with low birth weights and the percentage of undernourished children below 5 years of age—are generally better in the sub-Saharan Africa region. Sri Lanka is the major exception to this pattern"(18). Low birth weight in children could be a manifestion that women do not gain enough weight during pregnancy, possibly due to lack of calories (ENB-Coder Comment)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-DATA-5

"In South Asia in 2003–2005, for example, agricultural employment represented 46% of total female employment in India, 60% in Bangladesh, and about 40% in Sri Lanka (FAO, IFAD, and ILO 2010, p. 8)"(21)."In the PRC and in India, women accounted for 21% and 24%, respectively, of all fishers and fish farmers in 2008 (FAO 2012b, p. 108). They account for about 10% of the total aquaculture workforce in Malaysia, and in Sri Lanka they constitute 5% of the workforce in shrimp aquaculture and 30% of those engaged in the production and breeding of ornamental fish (FAO 2012c)"(42)."In the Rural Works component of the Sri Lanka Poverty Alleviation Programme financed in ...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"Indeed, while sub-Saharan African countries consistently rank lower than South Asian countries in Human Development Index (HDI) indicators, women- and child-specific nutrition indicators—such as infants born with low birth weights and the percentage of undernourished children below 5 years of age—are generally better in the sub-Saharan Africa region. Sri Lanka is the major exception to this pattern"(18). Low birth weight in children could be a manifestion of poor care/insufficient calories for women while pregnant (ENB-Coder Comment)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2, LR-DATA-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-DATA-1

"Tamil women on tea plantations in Sri Lanka, who are the majority of tea pickers, evidence high rates of illiteracy and lack of numeracy skills. Customarily, the husband or a male kin collects their daily payment at weighing time, with little of it accessed by the woman worker (Nandini Gunewardena, personal communication"(46)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LO-DATA-1, NGOFW-DATA-1

"Where women are not adequately supported in the use of loans granted for micro-enterprise development, or are not trained in management, the loans are of limited effect in the long term. This was one of the lessons drawn from the Sri Lanka Poverty Alleviation Project supported by the World Bank in 1991–1998. The project included the microcredit component in which a higher percentage of females (57%) than males benefited by allowing them to bypass money-lenders charging exorbitant rates. However, only about one-third of the beneficiaries successfully established and operated microenterprises over a period of 3 years. The World Bank evaluation report attributed low performance to insufficient preparation of the beneficiaries ...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"In South Asia in 2003–2005, for example, agricultural employment represented 46% of total female employment in India, 60% in Bangladesh, and about 40% in Sri Lanka (FAO, IFAD, and ILO 2010, p. 8)"(21)."In the PRC and in India, women accounted for 21% and 24%, respectively, of all fishers and fish farmers in 2008 (FAO 2012b, p. 108). They account for about 10% of the total aquaculture workforce in Malaysia, and in Sri Lanka they constitute 5% of the workforce in shrimp aquaculture and 30% of those engaged in the production and breeding of ornamental fish (FAO 2012c)"(42)."Tamil women on tea plantations in Sri Lanka, who are the majority of tea ...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

"Women often acquire land through government land allocation programs. Several countries have implemented land distribution schemes as part of land reform, land rehabilitation programs, or as part of anti-poverty programs. In most cases, however, women were not given equal rights under these schemes, with the male head of household given sole ownership of the land. That was the case, for instance, in the Mahaweli irrigation and resettlement scheme in Sri Lanka, as well in a major land reform initiative in the Indian state of West Bengal in the 1980s (Agarwal 2002)"(27)."Where women are not adequately supported in the use of loans granted for micro-enterprise development, or are not trained in ...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999). Female migrants formed threequarters of those migrating from Sri Lanka, and over half of those migrating from the Philippines in recent years (United Nations Research Institute for Social Development [UNRISD] 2005). They often become part of heavily segmented employment markets (Salazar Parrenas 2001)"(22-23)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2, ERBG-DATA-2

"In the Rural Works component of the Sri Lanka Poverty Alleviation Programme financed in 1991–1998 by the World Bank, it appeared that twice as many women as men participated in unpaid labor (World Bank 1998, p. 89)"(57)."The opportunity cost of women’s time rises due to their employment, affecting food consumption patterns and causing a shift to time-saving foods—especially commercially baked breads, as documented in Sri Lanka (Senauer, Sahn, and Alderman 1986)"(70)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LO-LAW-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1, GP-DATA-5

"Women often acquire land through government land allocation programs. Several countries have implemented land distribution schemes as part of land reform, land rehabilitation programs, or as part of anti-poverty programs. In most cases, however, women were not given equal rights under these schemes, with the male head of household given sole ownership of the land. That was the case, for instance, in the Mahaweli irrigation and resettlement scheme in Sri Lanka, as well in a major land reform initiative in the Indian state of West Bengal in the 1980s (Agarwal 2002)"(27)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, CWC-DATA-2, NGOFW-DATA-2, NGOFW-DATA-3

"In the Rural Works component of the Sri Lanka Poverty Alleviation Programme financed in 1991–1998 by the World Bank, it appeared that twice as many women as men participated in unpaid labor (World Bank 1998, p. 89)"(57)
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LO-DATA-3

"Women often acquire land through government land allocation programs. Several countries have implemented land distribution schemes as part of land reform, land rehabilitation programs, or as part of anti-poverty programs. In most cases, however, women were not given equal rights under these schemes, with the male head of household given sole ownership of the land. That was the case, for instance, in the Mahaweli irrigation and resettlement scheme in Sri Lanka, as well in a major land reform initiative in the Indian state of West Bengal in the 1980s (Agarwal 2002)"(27)."Where women are not adequately supported in the use of loans granted for micro-enterprise development, or are not trained in ...more