The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Sri Lanka

Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Belize, Benin, Botswana, Brunei, Central African Rep, Comoros, D R Congo, Gambia, Haiti, Iran, Japan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Maldives, Mali, Nigeria, Oman, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Vanuatu, Yemen
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

3.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Comoros, East Timor, Egypt, Fiji, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Moldova, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

2.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Section 360(C) of the penal code criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking and prescribed penalties of two to 20 years’ imprisonment and a fine, which were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with those prescribed for other serious offenses, such as rape. The government also frequently used Section 360(A), a procurement statute that criminalized obtaining a person to become a prostitute, with or without the consent of the person, to prosecute sex trafficking cases. Procurement crimes carried lesser penalties of two to 10 years’ imprisonment and fines, and prosecutors often brought these cases before magistrate judges who generally only had the authority to issue sentences of up...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"When authorities officially identified foreign victims of trafficking, they had access to the same rehabilitation services as domestic victims. Foreign victims who cooperated in prosecutions could receive a visa extension until the end of the trial; however, Sri Lankan law did not provide foreign victims with legal alternatives to deportation to countries where they might face hardship or retribution after trial completion or for victims who did not cooperate in the prosecution of traffickers. The government did not identify any foreign victims in Sri Lanka during the reporting period" (442).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Sri Lanka, and traffickers exploit victims from Sri Lanka abroad (…) Within the country, traffickers exploit women and children in sex trafficking. Traffickers exploit boys and girls in commercial sex in coastal areas for child sex tourism, including in hotels, on beaches, and during annual festivals. Reports allege some hotels allow clients to book 'services' with children for child sex tourism, and some hotels use intermediaries to provide their guests with males and females—including those younger than 18—for commercial sex. In addition to foreign tourists—including from Germany, Russia, India, and China—researchers report significant local demand...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Sri Lanka does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking; however, it is making significant efforts to do so. These efforts included convicting more traffickers than previous years, including the first conviction under the trafficking statute in five years; identifying more potential trafficking victims; and continuing to conduct numerous anti-trafficking trainings and awarenessraising events for government officials and civil society. However, the government did not demonstrate overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period. While it convicted more traffickers, it issued suspended sentences to some of those convicted and initiated significantly fewer prosecutions. Despite numerous trainings, officials did not make adequate efforts...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"The government identified 66 potential trafficking victims in 14 cases, an increase from 46 potential victims identified the previous reporting period and 23 in 2016. Among the 66 potential trafficking victims, authorities reported 56 males and 10 females, including three girls" (441).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1, ERBG-DATA-2

"Wage boards have equal minimum wages for male and female workers. In the white-collar categories, wages are largely set for the job irrespective of sex. Legal provisions relating to leave and holidays apply equally to men and women other than for one or two minor exceptions. Employment in government service may require a person to acquire proficiency in an official language within a reasonable period of time. While the government effectively enforced these laws and regulations, discrimination occurred based on the above categories with respect to employment and occupation. Some institutions would regularly specify particular positions as requiring male or female recruits. Women had no legal protection against discrimination in...more
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"Couples and individuals have the right to decide the number, spacing, and timing of their children; manage their reproductive health; and have access to the information and means to do so, free from discrimination, coercion, or violence" (Pg 30).
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"Estimating the prevalence of sexual abuse and domestic violence, in June former state minister of women’s and children’s affairs Rosy Senenayake said, “A woman is raped every 90 minutes in Sri Lanka and of 300,000 cases, only 600 perpetrators are remanded. Only 2 percent of the perpetrators in such cases are actually punished.” There were also a number of high-profile cases of rape and sexual violence that made national headlines and sparked intense debate" (Pg 28-29).
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"The law prohibits rape and domestic violence, but enforcement of the law was inconsistent. Sexual assault, rape, and spousal abuse remained pervasive societal problems. The law specifically addresses sexual abuse and exploitation and contains provisions in rape cases for equitable burden of proof and stringent punishments. The law considers marital rape an offense only in cases of legally separated spouses. An average rape case took six to 12 years to complete" (Pg 28). "An illustrative case occurred in March when a girl age 16 from Kilinochchi was allegedly gang-raped by three men and subsequently died from her injuries. Following the incident, human rights activists reported police repeatedly attempted to pressure...more
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2

"An illustrative case occurred in March when a girl age 16 from Kilinochchi was allegedly gang-raped by three men and subsequently died from her injuries. Following the incident, human rights activists reported police repeatedly attempted to pressure the girl’s grandmother into stating the cause of death was a brain disorder. The girl’s body was exhumed in April and sent to the judicial medical officer in Colombo for post-mortem investigation. The officer’s report had yet to be released by year’s end" (Pg 29). "Services to assist survivors of rape and domestic violence, such as crisis centers, legal aid, and counseling, were generally scarce due to a lack of funding. Language barriers...more
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-1, LBHO-LAW-1

"There are no laws that prevent women or minorities from participating in political life on the same basis as men or majority citizens. Some cultural and social barriers to women’s participation include financial constraints and the sometimes violent nature of local politics. There was no provision for, or allocation of, a set number or percentage of political party positions for women or minorities" (Pg 24).
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-1, AOM-PRACTICE-1, AOM-LAW-1, AOM-DATA-2

"The minimum legal age for marriage is 18 for both men and women, although girls may marry at age 16 with parental consent. According to the 2006-07 Demographic Health Survey, 11 percent of women between the ages 20 and 24 reported being married or in a union before age 18. The Ministry of Women and Children’s Affairs conducted programs in many districts to educate the public at the village level on the complications that may result from early marriage. In a 2013 study, Emerging Concerns and Case Studies on Child Marriage in Sri Lanka, the UN Children’s Fund documented a growing list of human rights concerns, especially for young girls,...more
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1, LO-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-2, IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"The law provides for equal employment opportunity in the public sector. Women have equal rights under civil and criminal law. Adjudication of questions related to family law--including divorce, child custody, and inheritance-- varied according to the customary law of each ethnic or religious group, resulting in discrimination" (Pg 30).
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-1

"There were a number of credible reports of sexual violence against women in which the alleged perpetrators were armed forces personnel, police officers, army deserters, or members of militant groups. Many women did not file official complaints, however, due to fear of retaliation" (Pg 29). "Sexual harassment is a criminal offense carrying a maximum sentence of five years in prison. Some observers acknowledged widespread sexual harassment. Reports of the prevalence of 'survival sex,' whereby vulnerable women engaged in sexual acts for monetary and other kinds of support or compensation, especially with security force personnel, continued to emerge. One report noted members of the security forces approached a woman in the...more
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-1, AOM-PRACTICE-1, AOM-LAW-1, AOM-DATA-2

"The minimum legal age for marriage is 18 for both men and women, although girls may marry at age 16 with parental consent. According to the 2006-07 Demographic Health Survey, 11 percent of women between the ages 20 and 24 reported being married or in a union before age 18. The Ministry of Women and Children’s Affairs conducted programs in many districts to educate the public at the village level on the complications that may result from early marriage. In a 2013 study, Emerging Concerns and Case Studies on Child Marriage in Sri Lanka, the UN Children’s Fund documented a growing list of human rights concerns, especially for young girls,...more
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: LRW-LAW-1, LRW-LAW-2, LRCM-LAW-1, DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-LAW-1

"The law prohibits rape and domestic violence, but enforcement of the law was inconsistent. Sexual assault, rape, and spousal abuse remained pervasive societal problems. The law specifically addresses sexual abuse and exploitation and contains provisions in rape cases for equitable burden of proof and stringent punishments. The law considers marital rape an offense only in cases of legally separated spouses. An average rape case took six to 12 years to complete" (Pg 28).
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1, GP-DATA-5

"Many women’s organizations believed that greater sensitization of police and the judiciary was necessary to make progress in combating rape. The police Bureau for the Prevention of Abuse of Women and Children conducted awareness programs in schools and at the grassroots level, encouraging women to file complaints. Police continued to establish women’s units in police stations" (Pg 29).
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2, IIP-LAW-2

"Sexual harassment is a criminal offense carrying a maximum sentence of five years in prison. Some observers acknowledged widespread sexual harassment. Reports of the prevalence of 'survival sex,' whereby vulnerable women engaged in sexual acts for monetary and other kinds of support or compensation, especially with security force personnel, continued to emerge. One report noted members of the security forces approached a woman in the north and told her that if she allowed them to have sex with her on a regular basis, they would compensate her. If she refused, they would rape her by force, so she chose the former course" (Pg 29).
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

The law prohibits discrimination based on race, sex, gender, disability, language, or social status, and the government generally respected these rights in practice. The constitution also has provisions that prohibit discrimination regarding religion, caste, political opinion, and place of birth. There were instances, however, in which gender, religious, disability and ethnic-based discrimination occurred" (Pg 28). "The law provides for equal employment opportunity in the public sector. Women have equal rights under civil and criminal law. Adjudication of questions related to family law--including divorce, child custody, and inheritance-- varied according to the customary law of each ethnic or religious group, resulting in discrimination" (Pg 30).
June 28, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"Services to assist survivors of rape and domestic violence, such as crisis centers, legal aid, and counseling, were generally scarce due to a lack of funding. Language barriers between service providers and victims were also reported. There was one government-established shelter for victims of domestic violence. The Ministry of Health, in partnership with NGOs, maintained hospital-based centers to provide medical assistance to those requiring attention for sexual assaultrelated injuries before referral to legal and psychosocial services" (Pg 29).
May 15, 2019, 6:51 p.m.
Countries: Bahamas, Bahrain, Belarus, Belize, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Comoros, D R Congo, Iran, Iraq, Japan, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Lithuania, Morocco, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Thailand, Vanuatu, Vietnam, Yemen
Variables: GP-SCALE-1

4.0
May 7, 2019, 10:02 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: IAW-LAW-1

Female and male surviving spouses have equal inheritance rights in Sri Lanka (136).
May 7, 2019, 10:02 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: GIC-LAW-3

There is not paid maternity leave available to women in Sri Lanka of at least 14 weeks. Women receive at least 2/3 of their wages for the duration of their maternity leave. The government pays for 0% of maternity leave benefits. There is no paid parental leave. Mothers are not guaranteed an equivalent position after returning to work from maternity leave. The government does not support or provide childcare services. Childcare payments are not tax deductible (136). Parents in Sri Lanka are not able to work flexibly (136). Working flexibly, such as working from home or taking partial days off to care for children, could be considered a childcare benefit...more
May 7, 2019, 10:02 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: ATFPA-LAW-1

In the Sri Lanka, there is no legislation designating head of household status (136).
May 7, 2019, 10:02 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: IIP-LAW-2, AFE-PRACTICE-1

There is legislation on sexual harassment in education in Sri Lanka (136).
May 7, 2019, 10:02 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Sri Lanka can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (136).
May 7, 2019, 10:02 a.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

Primary education in Sri Lanka is free and compulsory (136).