The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Sudan

Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Human rights groups alleged that NISS regularly harassed and sexually assaulted many of its female detainees. NISS arrested award-winning journalist and women’s rights activist Amal Habani in July on charges of indecent dress in violation of the Public Order Act. She stated publicly that she was physically assaulted while in police custody." (pg 6). "Overall conditions, including food, sanitary and living conditions, were reportedly better in women’s detention facilities and prisons, such as the Federal Prison for Women in Omdurman, than at equivalent facilities for men, such as Kober or Omdurman Prisons." (pg 7). "There were reports of individuals detained due to their actual or assumed support of antigovernment forces,...more
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"More than 10,000 women in the informal sector depended on selling tea on the streets of Khartoum State for their livelihoods after having fled conflict in Darfur and the Two Areas. Despite the collective activism of many tea sellers in Khartoum, harassment of tea sellers and confiscation of their belongings continued as in previous years." (52).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: INFIB-DATA-2

"According to UNICEF and UNFPA, the national prevalence rate of FGM/C among girls and women between 15 and 49 years old was 87 percent. Prevalence varied geographically and depended on the local ethnic group."(pg 42).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

"In October women’s rights activists reported that 45,000 complaints were issued against women under the Public Order Act in 2016. Of these, 15,000 women received the punishment of lashings. These numbers could not be independently verified." (pg 6).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"In August, 66 Eritrean citizens were rescued from human smugglers by security forces in Gergef near the Eritrean border. The group included 37 women and girls and 29 men and boys, of whom 30 were unaccompanied and separated children." (pg 34).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"Since the 2015 elections, women have held 30 percent of the National Assembly seats and 35 percent of the Senate seats." (pg 38).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: ABO-PRACTICE-1

"There were no reports of coerced abortion, involuntary sterilization, or other coercive population control methods." (pg 42).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"The most significant human rights issues included extrajudicial killings; torture, beatings, rape…lack of accountability in cases involving violence against women, including rape and female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); the use of child soldiers; trafficking in persons." (pg 2). "Security forces, rebel groups, and armed individuals perpetrated sexual violence against women and girls; the abuse was especially prevalent in the conflict areas." (pg 6). "Government forces abused persons detained in connection with armed conflict as well as IDPs suspected of having links to rebel groups. There were continuing reports that government security forces, progovernment and antigovernment militias, and other armed persons raped women and children." (pg 20). "Outside IDP camps and towns,...more
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: ASR-PRACTICE-1

"The government restricted academic freedom at cultural and academic institutions. It determined the curriculums and appointed the vice chancellors responsible for administration. It continued to arrest student activists and cancel or deny permits for some student events. Youth activists reported some universities discouraged students from participating in antigovernment rallies and showed favorable treatment towards NCP students. Some professors exercised self-censorship. Security forces used tear gas and other heavy-handed tactics against largely peaceful protests at universities or involving university students. The Public Order Police continued to monitor public gatherings and cultural events, often intimidating women and girls, who feared police would arrest them for “indecent” dress or actions." (para 28).more
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: FSCB-PRACTICE-1

" There were no reports of coerced abortion, involuntary sterilization, or other coercive population control methods." (pg 42).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: ASR-LAW-1

"The legal age of marriage was 10 years for girls and 15 years or puberty for boys. The government and the president’s wife continued to work to end child marriage." (pg 44).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: RCDW-PRACTICE-1

"Human rights groups alleged that NISS regularly harassed and sexually assaulted many of its female detainees. NISS arrested award-winning journalist and women’s rights activist Amal Habani in July on charges of indecent dress in violation of the Public Order Act. She stated publicly that she was physically assaulted while in police custody." (pg 5). "The law prohibits indecent dress and punishes it with a maximum of 40 lashes, a fine, or both. The law does not specify what it deems to be indecent dress. Officials acknowledged authorities applied these laws more frequently against women than men and applied them to both Muslims and non-Muslims. Most women were released following payment...more
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1

"The most significant human rights issues included extrajudicial killings; torture, beatings, rape…lack of accountability in cases involving violence against women, including rape and female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C); the use of child soldiers; trafficking in persons." (pg 2).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"In February 2015, an amendment to Artice 149 of the Criminal Code changed the definition of rape and added Article 151 (3) to criminalize the offense of sexual harassment. Under the new definition of rape, rape victim could no longer be prosecuted for adultery." (pg 41).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

"Outside IDP camps and towns, insecurity restricted freedom of movement, and women and girls who left the towns and camps risked sexual violence. Insecurity within IDP camps also was a problem. The government provided little assistance or protection to IDPs in Darfur. Most IDP camps had no functioning police force. International observers noted criminal gangs aligned with rebel groups operated openly in several IDP camps." (pg 33).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: INFIB-LAW-1

"FGM/C remained a problem throughout the country. No national law prohibits FGM/C, and the procedure continued to be used on women and girls throughout the country." (pg 42). "The government launched a national campaign in 2008 to eradicate FGM/C by 2018, and since 2008, five states had passed laws prohibiting FGM/C: South Kordofan, Gedaref, Red Sea, South Darfur, and West Darfur." (pg 42).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"Some observers believed traditional and cultural factors limited the participation of women in political life." (pg 38).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: PRN-LAW-1

"Penalties for offenses related to the sexual exploitation of children vary and can include imprisonment, fines, or both. The government tried to enforce laws criminalizing sexual exploitation of children. Some police stations included “child friendly” protection units and provided legal, medical, and psychosocial support for children." (pg 44). "Pornography, including child pornography, is illegal. Statutes prescribe a fine and period of imprisonment not to exceed 15 years for offenses involving child pornography." (pg 44).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6, MARR-LAW-5

"Under Islamic law a Muslim man may marry a Jewish or Christian woman. A Muslim woman may not marry a non-Muslim man." (pg 18). "A Muslim woman cannot legally marry a non- Muslim man." (pg 43).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LDS-PRACTICE-2

"Some domestic workers were believed to work under forced conditions or without pay. Women refugees were especially prone to labor violations." (pg 49).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1

"The law prohibits indecent dress and punishes it with a maximum of 40 lashes, a fine, or both. The law does not specify what it deems to be indecent dress. Officials acknowledged authorities applied these laws more frequently against women than men and applied them to both Muslims and non-Muslims. Most women were released following payment of fines...On December 21, a Public Order Court judge acquitted Omer, noting that the clothing she had worn was no different than clothing worn by other Sudanese women on a daily basis." (pg 6). "On December 10, police arrested Wini Nawal Omer, a human rights defender, while she was walking home from work and...more
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: IIP-LAW-1, IAW-PRACTICE-1, IAW-LAW-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"In accordance with Islamic judicial interpretation, a Muslim widow inherits one-eighth of her husband’s estate; of the remaining seven- eighths, two-thirds goes to the sons and one-third to the daughters." (pg 43)
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: NGOFW-PRACTICE-1

"On October 7, rebels kidnapped 70-year-old Swiss humanitarian worker Margaret Schenkel from her residence in El Fasher, North Darfur. Schenkel is a long-time resident of Darfur and well respected by the community for her work serving women and malnourished children. In mid-November, Schenkel was freed by security forces." (pg 23). "Following the death of Fatima Ahmed Ibrahim on August 12, a women’s rights activist and the first female parliamentarian, civil society organizations planned a public event to commemorate the political leader’s life. The organizers were denied permits to hold the event at numerous government-owned public locations. The event was then held at the Umma Party headquarters, which was controversial given...more
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"In February 2015, an amendment to Artice 149 of the Criminal Code changed the definition of rape and added Article 151 (3) to criminalize the offense of sexual harassment. Under the new definition of rape, rape victim could no longer be prosecuted for adultery." (pg 41). "There is no minimum age for consensual sex or statutory rape law." (pg 44).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"There were no reliable statistics on the prevalence of rape and domestic violence. The international expert on the human rights situation in Sudan and UNAMID’s human rights section reported that they received regular reports of incidents of rape and sexual and gender-based violence." (pg 41). "The government did not provide any information on the number of sexual harassment reports made." (pg 42).
Oct. 22, 2019, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LRW-LAW-3

"In certain probate trials, the testimony of women is not considered equivalent to that of men; the testimony of two women is required. In other civil trials, the testimony of a woman equals that of a man." (pg 43).
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Comoros, East Timor, Egypt, Fiji, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Moldova, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

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Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The 2014 anti-trafficking law criminalized some forms of sex trafficking and some forms of labor trafficking, but failed to define what constituted exploitation. Additionally, inconsistent with international law, Sudan’s anti-trafficking legal framework required a demonstration of force, fraud, or coercion to constitute a child sex trafficking offense, and therefore did not criminalize all forms of child sex trafficking. The law prescribed between three and 10 years’ imprisonment for base offenses involving adult male victims and between five and 20 years’ imprisonment for offenses involving adult female and child victims or involving additional aggravating circumstances; these penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with the penalties prescribed...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Due to a lack of consistent screening, officials likely penalized some victims for unlawful acts traffickers compelled them to commit." (444).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Sudan, and traffickers exploit victims from Sudan abroad. (…) Criminal groups exploit Sudanese women and girls—particularly internally displaced persons or those from rural areas—in domestic work and Sudanese girls to sex trafficking (...) Due to the ongoing conflict in South Sudan, there was an increase in South Sudanese refugees across Sudan, many of whom remained vulnerable to forced labor and sex trafficking in Sudan" (445).