The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Sudan

Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Comoros, East Timor, Egypt, Fiji, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Moldova, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

2.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The 2014 anti-trafficking law criminalized some forms of sex trafficking and some forms of labor trafficking, but failed to define what constituted exploitation. Additionally, inconsistent with international law, Sudan’s anti-trafficking legal framework required a demonstration of force, fraud, or coercion to constitute a child sex trafficking offense, and therefore did not criminalize all forms of child sex trafficking. The law prescribed between three and 10 years’ imprisonment for base offenses involving adult male victims and between five and 20 years’ imprisonment for offenses involving adult female and child victims or involving additional aggravating circumstances; these penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with the penalties prescribed...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Due to a lack of consistent screening, officials likely penalized some victims for unlawful acts traffickers compelled them to commit." (444).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Sudan, and traffickers exploit victims from Sudan abroad. (…) Criminal groups exploit Sudanese women and girls—particularly internally displaced persons or those from rural areas—in domestic work and Sudanese girls to sex trafficking (...) Due to the ongoing conflict in South Sudan, there was an increase in South Sudanese refugees across Sudan, many of whom remained vulnerable to forced labor and sex trafficking in Sudan" (445).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Sudan does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated significant efforts during the reporting period by convicting more traffickers; identifying more potential trafficking victims and referring them to services; developing standard operating procedures in partnership with international organizations to identify trafficking victims within vulnerable populations; and training more officials to effectively identify trafficking in persons. However, the government did not demonstrate overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period. Government military officials forcibly recruited a minor to serve in a combat role and reportedly recruited and provided forged documents for minors...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"In 2018, the MOI reported identifying approximately 1,400 potential trafficking victims, compared with 400 during the previous year. The UN reported the Criminal Investigation Department’s anti-trafficking unit referred 142 victims to a shelter run by an international organization; the government did not report referring any victims to care or directly providing such support in 2017" (444).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
July 13, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: GEW-PRACTICE-1

"The Sudanese president Omer Al Bashir has been charged by the international criminal court for crimes against humanity, particularly for his role in orchestrating mass rapes during the war in Darfur in western Sudan" (1).
July 13, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Some of these women have also documented being subjected to various forms of violence during demonstrations, and in prison – including disclosures of sexual violence intended to intimidate them and push them away from the public sphere, and from the protests" (1).
July 13, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1

"Public order laws and personal laws imposed since 1991 have prevented women from wearing what they want" (1).
July 13, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"Public order laws and personal laws imposed since 1991 have prevented women from… working" (1).
July 13, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"Women who put food on the table spoke out through WhatsApp and Facebook and rallied the people to defy the authoritarian regime. Women continued to lead peaceful street demonstrations, call for civil disobedience actions and take to social media in protest. Doctors, lawyers, students, teachers, and stay-at-home mothers have been steering the #SudanUprising for three months now, in the most sustained revolt against the regime in recent history. But women’s leadership, as is the case in countless countexts, is rarely recognised in the media. When it is reported, women are seen to have 'joined' protests – rather than being represented as leaders" (1).
July 13, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-3

"Women and men have both gathered and courageously faced live ammunition, tear gas, and heavy metal sticks in their backs… Sudan’s regime has clearly followed the example of the Egyptian state by targeting women activists through travel bans, asset freezing and judicial cases against them. It’s also followed in the footsteps of Saudi Arabia through detaining activists and denouncing 'those who conspire' against the state and 'seek to attack it'. Government forces have also attacked hospitals and doctors who’ve attempted to heal protestors, while interrogating and censoring journalists reporting on the protests – labeling them 'agitators' for 'incitement of hatred against the state'. Most recently, on 22 February, Al Bashir...more
July 13, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: IIP-LAW-1

"Public order laws and personal laws imposed since 1991 have prevented women from… walking on streets as they want, while stipulating restrictive rules like ‘male guardianship’ and ‘wife obedience’" (1).
July 13, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-2

"Sudanese women have always been the first enemy of the regime’s political religious fundamentalism… Meriem is vice president of The National Umma Party (a political party opposing the regime)" (1).
July 13, 2019, 12:03 a.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Sudanese women are fighting back against the Islamist state of Sudan after 30 years of oppression and humiliation… women… spoke out through WhatsApp and Facebook and rallied the people to defy the authoritarian regime. Women continued to lead peaceful street demonstrations, call for civil disobedience actions and take to social media in protest. Doctors, lawyers, students, teachers, and stay-at-home mothers have been steering the #SudanUprising for three months now, in the most sustained revolt against the regime in recent history. But… When it is reported, women are seen to have “joined” protests – rather than being represented as leaders. ‘Zagrouda’ (or the women’s chant) has become the calling code for...more
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1

"Various government institutions required women to dress according to Islamic or cultural standards, including wearing a head covering. In Khartoum Public Order Police occasionally brought women before judges for allegedly violating Islamic standards. Islamic standards for dress generally were not enforced for non-Muslims...On September 10, seven Cristian girls from South Sudan were arrested at a popular restaurant and convicted of indecent dress. The girls each were fined 100 SDG ($15)" (Pg 66).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"In two incidents in December 2014, a SAF sergeant and a police corporal raped 11-year-old girls. Authorities in Zalingei convicted the perpetrators and sentenced them to 20 years’ imprisonment. In another instance a SAF soldier raped a 27-year-old woman in Azom, Central Darfur, and was sentenced to 20 years’ imprisonment. As of November, two of these cases remained open for retrial following appeals" (Pg 29).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Some female detainees alleged NISS harassed and sexually assaulted them while in detention" (Pg 6). "In May security officials detained a female activist attempting to raise money for street children and questioned her about her work. Before releasing her, assailants cut her hair as a form of humiliation. A few days after her release, unidentified assailants trapped the woman in her vehicle, choked her with a cord, beat her, and tied her to a car seat. The home of the activist’s family was ransacked following the family’s attempts to file a case against authorities for the abuses" (Pg 6). "Reportedly, overall conditions, including food, sanitary and living conditions, were better...more
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

"It continued to arrest student activists and cancel or deny permits for some student events. Youth activists reported some universities discouraged students from participating in antigovernment rallies and showed favorable treatment towards NCP students. Some professors exercised self-censorship. Security forces used tear gas and other heavy-handed tactics against largely peaceful protests at universities or involving university students. The Public Order Police continued to monitor public gatherings and cultural events, often intimidating women and girls, who feared police would arrest them for “indecent” dress or actions" (Pg 45).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1

"FGM/C was traditionally practiced in the country. The government launched a national campaign in 2008 to eradicate FGM/C by 2018. The government, with the support of the first lady, continued to prioritize the “Saleema” campaign, which raised public awareness about FGM/C throughout the year. Despite these efforts FGM/C remained a problem for women and girls throughout the country. No national law prohibits FGM/C. Since 2008, however, five states have passed laws prohibiting FGM/C: South Kordofan, Gedaref, Red Sea, South Darfur, and West Darfur. In its October report, UNESCO expressed concern that the provisions criminalizing FGM/C were removed from the Child Health Act" (Pg 64). "The government attempted to curb the...more
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1, GP-DATA-1

"In July 2014 the National Assembly increased from 25 to 30 percent the proportion of seats in the national and state assemblies drawn from state-level women’s lists. Women held 120 of the 426 seats (28 percent) in the National Assembly, 19 of 54 seats (35 percent) on the Council of States, and eight of 88 (9 percent) positions in the cabinet" (Pg 58).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: INFIB-LAW-1

"FGM/C was traditionally practiced in the country. The government launched a national campaign in 2008 to eradicate FGM/C by 2018. The government, with the support of the first lady, continued to prioritize the “Saleema” campaign, which raised public awareness about FGM/C throughout the year. Despite these efforts FGM/C remained a problem for women and girls throughout the country. No national law prohibits FGM/C. Since 2008, however, five states have passed laws prohibiting FGM/C: South Kordofan, Gedaref, Red Sea, South Darfur, and West Darfur. In its October report, UNESCO expressed concern that the provisions criminalizing FGM/C were removed from the Child Health Act" (Pg 64).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: ATDW-LAW-5

"Depending on the wording of the marriage contract, it was often much easier for men than women to initiate legal divorce proceedings" (Pg 66).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Under sharia a Muslim man may marry a Jewish or Christian woman. A Muslim woman may not marry a non-Muslim unless he converts to Islam, but this prohibition was not universally enforced. Non-Muslims may adopt only non-Muslim children; a comparable restriction does not apply to Muslim parents" (Pg 20). "In May 2014 a local court sentenced Meriam Yahia Ibrahim Ishag to 100 lashes and death by hanging for committing apostasy and adultery by marrying a Christian man. Ishag identified herself as a Christian. The government released Ishag from custody in June 2014 after the Court of Appeals overturned her conviction. Following significant international pressure, authorities allowed her to leave the...more
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1, DV-PRACTICE-2, DV-LAW-1

"While the law prohibits violence in general, it does not specifically prohibit domestic violence. Violence, including spousal abuse, against women was common. Women who filed claims of domestic violence were subjected to accusations of lying or spreading false information, harassment, and detention. Consequently, many women were reluctant to file formal complaints, although such abuse constituted grounds for divorce. Police normally did not intervene in domestic disputes. Statistics on the number of abusers prosecuted, convicted, or punished were not available" (Pg 64).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: LRW-DATA-1

"Between December 2014 and October, UNAMID identified 54 cases of sexual and gender-based violence involving 93 victims, including 16 cases involving minors. Most victims were IDPs. UN Special Representative for the Secretary-General (SRSG) for Children and Armed Conflict Leila Zerrougui reported in May at least 60 girls were raped in 48 incidents in Darfur in 2014. The SRSG stated 15 were verified and attributed to the armed forces, 10 to the RSF, and 35 to unidentified armed men. In Darfur it was believed most rape victims did not report incidents, and the actual number of rapes was likely much higher" (Pg 28). "In Darfur UNAMID documented 27 incidents of sexual...more
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The Interim National Constitution states, 'All persons are equal before the law and are entitled without discrimination as to race, color, sex, language, religious creed, political opinion, or ethnic origin to the equal protection under the law.' Other articles of the constitution encourage tolerance between different tribes and provides for protection of women and persons with disabilities. The law provides for safeguards for children. The government worked to promote the rights of women, children, and persons with disabilities. It did not always provide protections to persons of different religious groups" (Pg 63).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"The law provides for tuition-free basic education up to grade eight, but students often had to pay school, uniform, and examination fees to attend. Primary education is neither compulsory nor universal. In Darfur few children outside of cities had access to primary education due to its high cost. In public schools, boys and girls are educated separately in urban areas but often together in rural areas, where resources are more limited" (Pg 67).
July 2, 2019, 12:52 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"In October 2014 Radio Dabanga, a media outlet with on-the-ground sources and local journalists (but which broadcasts from outside Sudan and which the government accuses of being a propaganda outlet for the armed groups of Darfur) reported SAF soldiers belonging to the military garrison near El Fasher, North Darfur, raped approximately 200 women and girls from Thabit village. The government rejected the allegations and delayed for several days UNAMID’s travel to Thabit to investigate the allegations. In February, Human Rights Watch issued a report detailing the mass rape. As of November the government had not made its full investigative report available to the public. Humanitarian and human rights groups reported...more