The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Tajikistan

Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Fiji, Gabon, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Niger, North Korea, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Korea, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Zambia
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

2.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Comoros, East Timor, Egypt, Fiji, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Moldova, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

2.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Throughout 2018, the government utilized provisions under its criminal code, which criminalized all forms of labor trafficking and some forms of sex trafficking. Article 130.1 criminalized labor trafficking and some forms of sex trafficking and prescribed penalties of five to eight years’ imprisonment, which were sufficiently stringent and, with regard to sex trafficking, commensurate with penalties prescribed for other serious crimes, such as rape. Inconsistent with international law, Article 130.1 required a demonstration of force, fraud, or coercion to constitute a child sex trafficking offense and therefore did not criminalize all forms of child sex trafficking. Article 167 prohibited the buying and selling of children and also prescribed five to...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Women in prostitution reported instances of sexual violence by law enforcement officials. It was possible officials penalized trafficking victims for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking (…) The law provided foreign victims the right to request temporary residency, which could be extended for one year following the completion of a criminal case, based on the victims’ cooperation with law enforcement agencies, although no such cases were reported in 2018" (457).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Tajikistan, and traffickers exploit victims from Tajikistan abroad (…) Women and children from Tajikistan are subjected to sex trafficking primarily in Turkey, UAE, and Russia, and also in Saudi Arabia, Kazakhstan, and Afghanistan, as well as within Tajikistan (...) Some women who traveled to Syria or Iraq with promises of marriage were instead sold into sexual slavery. Children of Tajik ISIS combatants in Iraq and Syria were vulnerable to child soldiering. Traffickers transport Tajik women and girls to Afghanistan for the purpose of forced marriage, which can lead to domestic servitude, sex trafficking, and debt bondage....more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Tajikistan does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but it is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Tajikistan was upgraded to Tier 2. These efforts included assuming oversight and financial responsibility for a trafficking shelter; amending the criminal code to eliminate inconsistencies with the 2014 victim protection law and remove a demonstration of force, fraud, or coercion for child sex trafficking; facilitating the return of Tajik children from Iraq and Syria; identifying significantly more trafficking victims; and collaborating with local and international civil society groups on the development and...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"The government identified 53 trafficking victims in 2018, an increase from 15 in 2017; the government did not provide additional information, such as the victims’ nationality, gender, and type and location of exploitation. An international organization reported assisting 20 victims of international trafficking, 11 of whom were referred by Tajik law enforcement, seven by NGOs, and two by embassies; all were Tajik citizens. Women constituted 19 of the 20 referrals; 12 of the victims were sexually exploited, eight were trafficked in forced labor" (457).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"Violence against women, including spousal abuse, remained a widespread problem. According to a survey conducted by the National Statistic Committee during the year, 19 percent of women between ages 15 and 49 reported they experienced physical violence since age 15. The highest incidence of domestic violence was reported in Sughd, where 22 percent of women reported suffering domestic violence. The lowest reported level of domestic violence was in the Districts of Republican Subordination around Dushanbe, where 13 percent of women reported suffering domestic violence. Women underreported violence against them due to fear of reprisal or inadequate response by police and the judiciary, resulting in virtual impunity for the perpetrators. Authorities...more
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: ISTD-PRACTICE-1, ISTD-DATA-1

"Women were increasingly vulnerable to HIV infection because of social taboos on discussion of sex education topics and popular sentiment against the use of condoms. Women remained a minority of those infected with HIV, although their incidence of infection was increasing. The government’s National Center on HIV, under the Ministry of Health, detected 580 cases of HIV infection during the first half of the year, of which 370 were male and 214 were female. There were 7,142 officially registered cases of HIV in the country, 4,953 of which involved men and 2,189 involved women" (Pg 26).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"The government did not interfere with the rights of individuals and couples to decide freely and responsibly the number, spacing, and timing of their children; to manage their reproductive health; and to have the information and means to do so, free from discrimination, coercion, and violence. Traditional stereotypes prevented women and girls from obtaining information on reproductive health" (Pg 21).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: SUICIDE-PRACTICE-1

"Physical and psychological abuse of wives by mothers-in-law was widespread. In some rural areas, officials observed a continued trend of female suicide in which independent observers considered such abuse to be a contributing cause" (Pg 20)
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"The law provides for the rights and freedoms of every person regardless of race, gender, disability, language, or social status, but there was discrimination against women and persons with disabilities. Trafficking in persons for sexual and labor exploitation remained a problem" (Pg 19).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1, GP-DATA-1

"Women were underrepresented in decision-making processes at all levels of political institutions. Female representation in all branches of government was less than 30 percent. There was one female minister but no ministers from minority groups. A deputy prime minister; the minister of labor, migration, and employment; and several deputy ministers were women. In the 63-member lower chamber of parliament, there were 12 female members and no minority group members. In the 33-member upper chamber of parliament, there were six women and two members of a minority group. Cultural practices discouraged participation by women in politics, although the government and political parties made efforts to promote their involvement, such as the...more
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: AFE-LAW-1

"Free and universal public education is compulsory until age 16 or completion of the ninth grade. The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) reported that school attendance generally was good through the primary grades, but girls faced disadvantages, especially in rural school systems where families elected to keep them home after primary grades to take care of siblings or work in agriculture. Families often invested money in their sons’ education rather than that of their daughters so that the boys, with a better education, could provide for them and take care of their parents in old age" (Pg 22).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: GP-DATA-3, GP-DATA-4, NGOFW-DATA-1, NGOFW-DATA-2

"Five police stations were fully equipped and staffed with police officers trained, with OSCE support, to respond to family violence cases and address the needs of victims in a gender-sensitive manner. In rural areas the government and NGOs operated additional crisis centers and hotlines where women could seek guidance on domestic violence problems and legal assistance, but many centers lacked funding and resources. Local governments donated the premises of three of the shelters. The Committee for Women’s Affairs (within the government) had limited resources to assist domestic violence victims, but local committee representatives referred women to the crisis shelters for assistance" (Pg 20).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"The law prohibits discrimination with respect to employment and occupation on the basis of race, sex, gender, disability, language, sexual orientation, gender identity, HIV-positive status, other communicable diseases, or social status" (Pg 29).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: ADCM-PRACTICE-1, IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

"Inheritance laws do not discriminate against women, although some inheritances passed disproportionately to sons. In addition, many men hid their assets with their parents or other family members, so that if divorce occurred, they could claim no wealth and become exempt from paying child support or other restitution to the former wife" (Pg 22).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

"No specific statute banned sexual harassment in the workplace. Victims often did not report incidents because of fear of social stigma. Authorities often perceived sexual harassment as female fabrications. Women reporting sexual harassment faced retaliation from their employers as well as scrutiny from their families and communities" (Pg 21).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: MARR-LAW-5, ATDW-PRACTICE-1, ATDW-PRACTICE-2

"Due to family pressure, young women, especially adolescent girls, often dropped out of school to marry. The law protects women’s rights in marriage and family matters, but families often pressured female minors to marry against their will. Religious marriages were common substitutes for civil marriages, due to the high marriage registration fees associated with civil marriages and the power afforded men under religious law. In cases of religious marriages not registered with the government, husbands simply repeated a phrase in front of two witnesses to divorce their wives. Husbands also used these officially unregistered religious marriages to prevent wives from accessing family assets and other rights in the event of...more
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-1, AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Many of these polygynous marriages involved underage brides. Unofficial second and third marriages were increasingly common, with neither the wives nor their children having legal standing or rights" (Pg 22). "The legal minimum age for marriage of men and women is 18 years. Under exceptional circumstances, which a judge must determine, such as in the case of pregnancy, a couple may also apply to a court to lower the marriageable age to 17. Underage religious marriage was more widespread in rural areas. Many parents told their daughters to quit school after ninth grade, at which point parents considered their daughters to have obtained sufficient professional skills, such as sewing or...more
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

"No specific statute banned sexual harassment in the workplace. Victims often did not report incidents because of fear of social stigma. Authorities often perceived sexual harassment as female fabrications. Women reporting sexual harassment faced retaliation from their employers as well as scrutiny from their families and communities" (Pg 21). "Although the law provides for women and women to receive equal pay for equal work, cultural barriers restricted women’s professional opportunities (see section 7.d.)" (Pg 21).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: ERBG-DATA-1

"The law provides that women receive equal pay as men for equal work, but cultural barriers continued to restrict the professional opportunities available to women. Employers forced women to work overtime without additional pay" (Pg 29).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: PW-PRACTICE-2, PW-PRACTICE-3

"The 2004 Council of Ulema fatwa prohibiting Hanafi Sunni women--constituting the vast majority of the female population--from praying in mosques remained in effect. Religious ceremonies also made polygyny possible, despite the illegality of the practice. NGOs estimated that up to 10 percent of men practiced polygyny. Many of these polygynous marriages involved underage brides. Unofficial second and third marriages were increasingly common, with neither the wives nor their children having legal standing or rights" (Pg 21-22).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1, LRW-PRACTICE-2, LRW-LAW-1, LRW-LAW-2, LRCM-LAW-1

"The law prohibits rape, which is punishable by up to 20 years’ imprisonment. There was no separate statute for spousal rape. The government did not provide statistics on the number of cases or convictions. Law enforcement officials usually advised women not to file charges but registered cases at the victim’s insistence. Most observers believed the majority of cases were unreported because victims wished to avoid humiliation" (Pg 19).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: PW-DATA-1

"The 2004 Council of Ulema fatwa prohibiting Hanafi Sunni women--constituting the vast majority of the female population--from praying in mosques remained in effect. Religious ceremonies also made polygyny possible, despite the illegality of the practice. NGOs estimated that up to 10 percent of men practiced polygyny" (Pg 21).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"Violence against women, including spousal abuse, remained a widespread problem. According to a survey conducted by the National Statistic Committee during the year, 19 percent of women between ages 15 and 49 reported they experienced physical violence since age 15. The highest incidence of domestic violence was reported in Sughd, where 22 percent of women reported suffering domestic violence. The lowest reported level of domestic violence was in the Districts of Republican Subordination around Dushanbe, where 13 percent of women reported suffering domestic violence. Women underreported violence against them due to fear of reprisal or inadequate response by police and the judiciary, resulting in virtual impunity for the perpetrators. Authorities...more
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1

"The Ministry of Education maintained a dress code that bans wearing the hijab in schools and government institutions. Authorities allowed women to wear a traditional version of the head covering--a scarf that covers hair but not the neck-- to schools and universities. Many female students wore the hijab to and from school but removed it upon entering the school building. Parents and school officials appeared to accept this arrangement. The ministry also maintained its ban on beards for all teachers. Students with beards reported being removed from class, questioned, and asked to shave" (Pg 11).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1, LO-LAW-1

"According to the World Bank report, Women, Business, and the Law 2014, women and men have equal ownership rights to property, although women owned significantly less property than men" (Pg 21).
July 3, 2019, 12:27 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"The legal minimum age for marriage of men and women is 18 years. Under exceptional circumstances, which a judge must determine, such as in the case of pregnancy, a couple may also apply to a court to lower the marriageable age to 17. Underage religious marriage was more widespread in rural areas. Many parents told their daughters to quit school after ninth grade, at which point parents considered their daughters to have obtained sufficient professional skills, such as sewing or cooking, to have a source of income in the future. The law expressly prohibits forced marriages of girls under age 18 or entering into a marriage contract with a girl...more