The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Tanzania

Sept. 29, 2020, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: MMR-PRACTICE-1

"Unsafe abortions kill many Tanzanian women, according to a recent study, but the deaths result from several factors and women in some regions die much more often than others" (para 1). "Tanzania's abortion rate -- 36 per 1,000 women-- is typical for East Africa. But abortions and related deaths are nearly five times higher for women in the north, near Lake Victoria, and in the southern highlands, than for women living on the island of Zanzibar. Zanzibar is 98 percent Muslim; polygamy is common and extramarital sex is taboo, so unplanned pregnancies are rare, Dr. Keogh said" (para 7).
Sept. 29, 2020, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: ABO-DATA-1

"Unsafe abortions kill many Tanzanian women, according to a recent study, but the deaths result from several factors and women in some regions die much more often than others" (para 1). "Of one million unintended pregnancies in 2013, the study found, 39 percent ended in abortion" (para 2). "Tanzania's abortion rate -- 36 per 1,000 women-- is typical for East Africa. But abortions and related deaths are nearly five times higher for women in the north, near Lake Victoria, and in the southern highlands, than for women living on the island of Zanzibar. Zanzibar is 98 percent Muslim; polygamy is common and extramarital sex is taboo, so unplanned pregnancies are...more
Sept. 29, 2020, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1

"Birth control is hard to get, and public health clinics lack trained staff and vacuum aspiration kits used to perform abortions" (para 2).
Sept. 29, 2020, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"Birth control is hard to get" (para 2).
Sept. 29, 2020, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: ABO-LAW-1

"In addition, the legality of abortion is ambiguous, forcing many women to try to do it themselves or see illegal abortion providers" (para 2). "Although Tanzania ratified the African Union's 2005 Maputo Protocol on women's rights--which endorsed abortion rights-- and also recognizes colonial-era British case law permitting abortion in some circumstances, national law mandates 14-year sentences for anyone 'unlawfully' performing an abortion and seven years for women who try to make themselves miscarry-- but without defining 'unlawfully', said Sarah C. Keogh, a Guttmacher Institute researcher and the study's lead author" (para 4). "The notion that two doctors must approve an abortion to make it legal 'is just a rumor, but...more
Sept. 29, 2020, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: ATC-DATA-5

"Although Tanzania ratified the African Union's 2005 Maputo Protocol on women's rights--which endorsed abortion rights-- and also recognizes colonial-era British case law permitting abortion in some circumstances, national law mandates 14-year sentences for anyone 'unlawfully' performing an abortion and seven years for women who try to make themselves miscarry-- but without defining 'unlawfully', said Sarah C. Keogh, a Guttmacher Institute researcher and the study's lead author" (para 4).
Sept. 29, 2020, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: DSFMF-PRACTICE-3, PW-DATA-1

"Zanzibar is 98 percent Muslim; polygamy is common and extramarital sex is taboo, so unplanned pregnancies are rare, Dr. Keogh said" (para 7).
Sept. 29, 2020, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: ABO-PRACTICE-1

"In addition, the legality of abortion is ambiguous, forcing many women to try to do it themselves or see illegal abortion providers" (para 2). "Although Tanzania ratified the African Union's 2005 Maputo Protocol on women's rights--which endorsed abortion rights-- and also recognizes colonial-era British case law permitting abortion in some circumstances, national law mandates 14-year sentences for anyone 'unlawfully' performing an abortion and seven years for women who try to make themselves miscarry-- but without defining 'unlawfully', said Sarah C. Keogh, a Guttmacher Institute researcher and the study's lead author" (para 4). The severity of these punishments suggests that Tanzanian culture places a social taboo on abortion (RAO-CODER COMMENT). "Women...more
Sept. 7, 2020, 10:53 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: DACH-DATA-3

"The median age at first intercourse for women ages 25-49 is 17.2 years old in 2015-2016."
Sept. 7, 2020, 7:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, D R Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Palestine, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Russia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: ISSA-SCALE-1

2.0more
Sept. 5, 2020, 5:02 p.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Suriname, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: AOM-SCALE-3

2.0
Sept. 5, 2020, 5:02 p.m.
Countries: Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, China, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, D R Congo, Denmark, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Liberia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, North Korea, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Rwanda, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam
Variables: AOM-SCALE-2

0.0more
Sept. 5, 2020, 5:01 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Cuba, D R Congo, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: AOM-SCALE-1

2.0more
Sept. 3, 2020, 11:45 a.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: WR-DATA-1

In Tanzania, there are about 610,722 widows, as estimated in 2015.
Sept. 2, 2020, 12:04 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia, Tanzania
Variables: PHBP-PRACTICE-1

“Barabaig women in Tanzania wear dotted scars surrounding the entire orbital region to signal female perfection. Comparable scars, in addition partly covering the cheeks, are found among Bumi men in Ethiopia. Some prestigious Fulani women show four‐three‐lane keloid chains in their faces to indicate their social rank. In fact, the ornaments may serve in these tribes as identity cards, indicating age, puberty, marital status, social status and merits, and they are perceived as signs of attractiveness.”
Sept. 2, 2020, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: CBMC-DATA-1, MABFC-DATA-1

"Tanzania is among countries with the highest adolescent pregnancy and birth rates in the world, with 21 percent of girls aged 15 to 19 having given birth based on a 2015/16 survey by the Tanzania’s own Bureau of Statistics" (para 4).
Sept. 2, 2020, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AOM-DATA-2

"Tanzania is currently ranked position 11 for having the highest absolute number of child brides in the world, according to UNICEF" (para 5).
Sept. 2, 2020, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"For the last 59 years, Tanzania has had a discriminatory ban that denies pregnant school girls their right to education. This ban does not take into account the jarring realities that often lead to the pregnancies in the first place. In the past 4 years this ban has been aggravated and reinforced by various political pronouncements. It prohibits girls from accessing education, not just for the duration of their pregnancy but even after. Considering that these girls may first be survivors of sexual violence or sexual exploitation, this ban is not only unjust but a double violation of their rights" (para 1-2). "More than 55,000 schools girls in Tanzania have...more
Sept. 2, 2020, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-1

"More than 55,000 schools girls in Tanzania have been expelled from school over the last decade as a result of the ban yet Tanzania continues to hold the unenviable reputation of having one of the highest rates of sexual violence in sub-Saharan Africa" (para 3). "This is so much that in December 2017 President John Magufuli pardoned two paedophiles and renewed calls to have pregnant school girls arrested before he later invited the paedophiles to the Tanzania State House. The two had been convicted of sexually assaulting 10 children among them girls, aged between 6 and 8" (para 6). "Many sexual violence cases are settled outside of the country’s justice...more
Aug. 31, 2020, 3:52 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: PHBP-LAW-1

“The government in Tanzania has officially banned the manufacture, sale, supply, and distribution of 168 various skin-bleaching cosmetic products containing prohibited ingredients such as mercury and hydroquinone (Tanzania Food and Drug Authority, 2003). Government agencies are also engaging in efforts to educate the public on the negative effects of skin bleaching via educational radio programs, brochures, books, and public forums (Tanzanian Food and Drug Authority, 2004; Warning Issued, 2009). However, creams are still readily accessible and the ban on importation, exportation, and sale of these creams is poorly enforced.”
Aug. 31, 2020, 3:51 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: PHBP-DATA-1

“Our study specifically looks at one East African community—Dar es Salaam, Tanzania—where recent research indicates that skin bleaching is increasing at estimated rates of nearly 30% annually, with women being the primary users (Lewis, 2009). Similar to findings from other regions of Africa, there has been a rise in the practice of skin bleaching in Tanzania among educated women in their 20s and 30s who are financially secure.”
Aug. 31, 2020, 3:50 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: PHBP-PRACTICE-1

“Six interrelated themes emerged about what motivates Tanzanian women to engage in skin-bleaching practices: (a) to remove pimples, rashes, and skin disease (17% of sample); (b) to have soft skin (5%); (c) to be White, beautiful, and more European looking (38%); (d) to remove the adverse affects of extended skin bleaching on the body (e.g., uneven skin tone and dark patches) (2%); (e) to satisfy one’s partner and/or attract male mates (14%); and (f) to satisfy/impress peers (22%).”
Aug. 29, 2020, 12:49 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: PHBP-PRACTICE-1

“In a Tanzanian study, women in relationships admitted to using the [skin lightening] products as a way to maintain their appeal to their partners.”
Aug. 13, 2020, 7:16 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: PHBP-PRACTICE-1

“The perceived attractiveness of whiter skin carries a strong appeal. In a qualitative survey in Tanzania by psychologist Kelly Lewis and colleagues, a 40-year-old teacher offers a simple reason for lightening her skin: “I use skin bleaching creams to avoid my husband from being attracted by other girls. … After my marriage, I intended to maintain my beauty to make my husband proceed loving me.””
Aug. 9, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"In 2017, President Magufuli banned pregnant girls and young mothers from attending school. Police have arrested pregnant schoolgirls and their families to force them to reveal the identity of the men or boys who had impregnated them while schools have subjected girls to forced pregnancy tests. In June [2019], Tanzanian civil society organizations filed a complaint before the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, seeking to have this policy annulled. Following discussions between the government and the World Bank on a loan for secondary education, the government committed to finding ways for pregnant girls to return to school" (para. 16).
Aug. 9, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"In October [2019], Tanzania’s Court of Appeal upheld a 2016 High Court ruling directing the government to raise the legal age of marriage to 18 years for both girls and boys. Tanzania’s Marriage Act of 1971 had set the minimum marriage age for girls at 15 with parental consent, and 18 for boys, and permitted the marriage of 14-year-old children when a court is satisfied that there is the existence of special, but unspecified, circumstances" (para. 18).
Aug. 9, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"In October, Tanzania’s Court of Appeal upheld a 2016 High Court ruling directing the government to raise the legal age of marriage to 18 years for both girls and boys. Tanzania’s Marriage Act of 1971 had set the minimum marriage age for girls at 15 with parental consent, and 18 for boys, and permitted the marriage of 14-year-old children when a court is satisfied that there is the existence of special, but unspecified, circumstances" (para. 19).
July 28, 2020, 8:54 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"Girls and boys in Tanzania have cause to celebrate: child marriage is now illegal in the country. Tanzania’s Marriage Act of 1971 sets the minimum marriage age for girls at 15 with parental consent, and 18 for boys. It permits the marriage of 14-year-old children when a court is satisfied that special, although unspecified, circumstances exist. In a landmark 2016 decision, a Tanzanian high court ruled these provisions unconstitutional, and directed the government to raise the legal age of marriage to 18 years for both girls and boys. This ruling followed a legal challenge by the Msichana Initiative, an organization advocating for girls’ right to education in Tanzania. Their petition...more
July 28, 2020, 8:48 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"The Law of Marriage Act 1971 allows for boys to marry at 18 years and girls to marry at 14 with consent of the court, and at the age of 15 with parental consent. In July 2016, the Constitutional Court ruled that marriage under the age of 18 was illegal, and stated that sections 13 and 17 of the Marriage Act (with its exceptions) were unconstitutional. This landmark ruling was the result of a petition by Mischana Initiative, a Girls Not Brides member. The matter is the subject of an appeal by the Attorney General of the State" (29-30)
July 27, 2020, 11:48 a.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AOM-DATA-2

According to 2016 data from the UNICEF Data Warehouse, 5.2% of women (aged 20-24 years) were married or in union before age 15 and 30.5% of women (aged 20-24 years) were married or in union before age 18 (CODER COMMENT - MAD)