The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for Thailand

May 2, 2018, 9:32 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"in Thailand the number of female parliamentarians dropped after the military coup of 2014, from 16 per cent to 6.1 per cent" (para 9).
April 19, 2018, 10:25 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IRP-DATA-1

"In 2004, Dr. Nitet Tinnakul, while working at Chulalongkorn University, said that the sex industry in Thailand involved 2.8 million people: 2 million women; 20,000 adult males, and 800,000 minors under the age of 18" (para 4).
April 19, 2018, 10:25 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, AOM-PRACTICE-1

"Thai women historically have been used as chattel. F.A. Neale’s book, ‘Residence in Siam’, written in the late 19th century, explains that he witnessed fathers taking their unmarried 13 year old daughters, “having reached their expiration date”, to their shops to be “ sold to the highest bidder”, or even “sold to Arab merchants”. Dok Kaew, the practice of selling off a daughter at a young age to a male buyer – although not available until she came of age – was evident in Thailand until the ’90s" (para 5).
April 19, 2018, 10:25 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IRP-LAW-1

"You should know that prostitution has been illegal in Thailand since 1960. Still, it’s estimated to be worth US$6.4 billion a year in revenue, a large part of the country’s GDP, according to black market research company Havocscope" (para 3). "But this last week it seems the nation was shocked by a moment of lewd candidness after a Thai sex worker in the city of Pattaya was caught on camera fellating her Korean John. The aptly named Pol.Col. Sukthat Pumpanmuang, superintendent of Pattaya Police Station, said that the couple would be charged with public indecency, as was reported by Khaosod...The offending bar was shut down for 10 days, and life...more
April 19, 2018, 10:25 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IRP-PRACTICE-1

"A lot of women, and men, in Thailand sell sexual services for money...Only over the last few years has the full body massage (no penetration) become extremely popular, with new houses of supposedly ill-repute opening and closing – as is often the case with the service orientated industry in Thailand – all over the country. There’s also now what is referred to as the business of sidelines, which is young girls, supposedly of a more pure status, selling themselves online. It’s no secret; in this report by the Kinsey Institute, “90% of the [Thai] male participants had had sex with a prostitute and 74% had lost their virginity with a...more
April 19, 2018, 10:25 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IRP-DATA-2

"In 2004, Dr. Nitet Tinnakul, while working at Chulalongkorn University, said that the sex industry in Thailand involved 2.8 million people: 2 million women; 20,000 adult males, and 800,000 minors under the age of 18. Dr. Nitet explained that this number includes those indirectly involved in the industry, including cleaners at establishments, accountants, and even corrupt policemen receiving kickbacks from bars" (para 4).
April 19, 2018, 10:01 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"In the afternoon I was going to get some rest, but Ms Noina called me on the phone. She is from the Wat Sake's shantytown. She was in tears: her daughter was beaten by her husband for the umpteenth time. She asked me if I could go with her to get her daughter and two grandchildren of three and a year...On the way, we talked about the latter’s problems. Her husband left her and her oldest son, in his thirties, beats her. At about 2.30 pm we arrived at the house of Noina's daughter, Leck. Her face still swollen from the beating, she took her children and ran out. The...more
April 19, 2018, 10:01 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IRP-PRACTICE-1

"Nat, the wife, has had a very troubled life. She was bought as a child by a family who then “lent” her to a prostitution house for money" (para 5).
April 16, 2018, 8:40 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IRP-PRACTICE-1

"In an attempt to redefine Thailand as a destination for 'quality' tourism, tourism minister Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul recently proclaimed she wants the country’s sex industry 'gone.' At the same time, police have launched a series of raids on bars and clubs, saying the aim is to tackle trafficking, underage sex work and licensing breaches" (para 2). "According to Empower spokeswoman Liz Hilton, the story is the same for many of the disadvantaged Thai women who choose to enter the sex industry: After trying to make ends meet in a series of jobs, they turn to sex work as a last-ditch attempt to fulfill their economic duties. 'This is a group of...more
April 16, 2018, 8:40 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: SMES-DATA-2

"Anecdotal evidence suggests that at least 80 percent of Thailand’s sex workers are single mothers, and all are supporting some combination of parents, grandparents, and sometimes siblings with their sex work. The national wage is currently set at 300 Thai baht (about $8) per day. According to Hilton, even the lowest-paid sex workers can bring home twice that much" (para 12).
April 16, 2018, 8:40 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IRP-PRACTICE-4

"Now Mint is getting help from NightLight, a charitable foundation and outreach project that helps sex workers who want to transition out of the industry. CEO Annie Dieselberg says that although the organization would ultimately like to see the end of sex tourism, that can’t happen until the government addresses the issues that force women to turn to sex work in the first place" (para 16).
April 16, 2018, 8:40 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IRP-LAW-1

"Though prostitution is technically illegal in Thailand, the thinly veiled cover of bars, karaoke clubs and massage shops do little to counter the town’s long-held reputation as a mecca for partying, sun and sex" (para 1). "The solicitation of sex has been illegal in Thailand since the 1960s. However, with the onset of the Vietnam War and the subsequent influx of U.S. soldiers across Southeast Asia, the industry flourished. When the military left, tourists took their place. Ever since then, Thailand’s sex industry has been openly, if reluctantly, tolerated by authorities" (para 10).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"According to the UN Children’s Fund 2012 UNICEF Report Card on Adolescents, however, the birth rate in the country per 1,000 girls from 15 to 19 years was 43, placing it second highest among countries in East Asia and the Pacific" (37).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: IIP-LAW-2

"Sexual harassment is illegal in both the public and private sectors. The law specifies maximum fines of 20,000 baht ($550) for individuals convicted of sexual harassment. The punishment depends on the degree of harassment. Abuse categorized as an indecent act may result in maximum 15 years’ imprisonment and a maximum fine of 30,000 baht ($830)" (37).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: CWC-DATA-3

"The government allowed UNHCR to monitor the protection status of the more than 110,000 Burmese refugees and asylum seekers living in nine camps along the border with Burma but prohibited UNHCR from any assistance role in the camps" (26). There are a large number of refugees coming from Burma (aka Myanmar), which borders Thailand (AA-CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"There were 13 women in the NCPO-appointed 218-member NLA...The previous elected government had 81 women in the 500-seat lower house" (31).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"NGO-supported programs included emergency hotlines, temporary shelters, and counseling services to increase awareness of domestic violence, HIV/AIDS, and other matters involving women...The government’s crisis centers, located in all state-run hospitals, cared for abused women and children, although several centers faced budget constraints. Government hospitals referred abused women to private organizations when inhospital services were not available" (36). "The Ministry of Social Development and Human Security continued to develop a community-based system, operating in all regions of the country, to protect women from domestic violence. The program focused on training representatives from each community on women’s rights and abuse prevention to increase community awareness" (36).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"The government reported investigating 280 trafficking cases, prosecuting 155 traffickers, and obtaining convictions against 151 traffickers during 2014. Of the 280 trafficking cases, 58 investigations (20 percent) involved suspected cases of forced labor" (49).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: EWCMS-LAW-4

"NGOs lobbied for more female investigators in police stations to deal with violence against women cases, and police made some efforts to increase women’s enrollment into the Police Cadet Academy. During the year female officers constituted approximately 8 percent of police personnel countrywide, the same as reported in 2014. There were an estimated 300 female police investigators nationwide, with 130 based in Bangkok" (35). "The Police Cadet Academy for commissioned officers accepts female cadets and reserved 70 of 280 places in the cadet class for women. The first female cadet class graduated from the four-year program in 2013, and three groups of 70 women have graduated from the program and...more
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: EWCMS-DATA-1

"According to the Ministry of Defense’s Personnel Directorate, 96 women held the rank of general or equivalent across all military branches and within the Ministry of Defense as of August, an increase from 85 in 2014. Women also accounted for approximately 35,000 of the country’s 300,000 military personnel" (38).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"In April the government reaffirmed its “zero tolerance” policy for human trafficking and re-emphasized combatting trafficking in persons (TIP) as a national priority. The government established a new prime minister-led national committee to combat human trafficking, forced labor, child labor, illegal migration, and illegal fishing to address problems in a more integrated manner" (49).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: CBMC-DATA-1

"According to a World Health Organization report, the country has the second highest number of teenage births among Association of Southeast Asian Nations countries" (40).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: GP-DATA-1

"...three female ministers in the 34-person interim cabinet (Ministry of Tourism and Sport, Ministry of Industry, and Ministry of Commerce)" (31). "According to the Office of the Civil Service Commission, women held 17 percent of executive-level civil service positions, a significant decrease from 2014" (38).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"NGOs suggested reports of early forced marriage in the country were not yet at the level of serious concern when compared to the problems of rape, domestic violence, and premature pregnancy among teens. Nonetheless, NGOs noted early forced marriage between student teens who become pregnant, a practice to 'save face' and protect the baby’s legal status, appeared to be increasing as the country’s teenage pregnancy rate also increased" (40).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Military academies (except for the nursing academy) refused admittance to female students, although a significant number of instructors were women" (38).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: DV-LAW-2

"The law imposes a maximum fine of 6,000 baht ($170) or a maximum of six months’ imprisonment for violators and provides authorities, with court approval, the power to prohibit offenders from remaining in their homes or contacting family members during trial. The law also establishes measures designed to facilitate both the reporting of domestic violence complaints and reconciliation between the victim and the perpetrator. Additionally, the law restricts media reporting on domestic violence cases in the judicial system" (35-36). "Sentencing in those cases that resulted in conviction included imprisonment of the abuser (three months maximum); attendance at mental “rehabilitation;” or payment of fines, probation, or both" (36).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"The law specifies penalties for conviction of rape or forcible sexual assault ranging from four years’ imprisonment to the death penalty, as well as fines, depending on such factors as age of the victim, severity of the assault, use of a weapon, multiple assailants, and physical and mental condition of the victim afterward. The amount of the fine depends on the severity of injury to the victim and generally varies from 8,000 to 40,000 baht ($220 to $1,110). The law also provides that any individual convicted twice for the same type of criminal rape within three years may receive increased penalties for recidivism" (35). "The law imposes a jail term...more
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"NGOs lobbied for more female investigators in police stations to deal with violence against women cases, and police made some efforts to increase women’s enrollment into the Police Cadet Academy" (35). Public discourse and lobbying appears to be influencing policies, meaning that the discourse is taken at least somewhat seriously. Some issues, such as sexual assault/rape, are given more consideration than others, such as domestic violence laws (AA-CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: INFIB-LAW-1

"No specific law prohibits this practice" (36). This refers specifically to female genital mutilation and cutting, FGM/C (AA-CODER COMMENT). "There were no reports of international or governmental efforts to prevent or address the practice" (37).
Jan. 25, 2018, 9:09 a.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"Authorities prosecuted some domestic violence crimes, particularly cases where the perpetrator seriously injured the victim, under provisions for assault or violence against a person, where they could seek harsher penalties. Domestic violence frequently went unreported, however, and police often were reluctant to pursue reports of domestic violence" (36).