The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Tunisia

Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Guyana, Iceland, Iraq, Italy, Kazakhstan, Laos, Latvia, Macedonia, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, South Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tanzania, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

1.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Comoros, East Timor, Egypt, Fiji, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Moldova, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

2.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:41 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: TRAFF-LAW-3

"The government offered foreign trafficking victims legal alternatives to their removal to countries where they might face hardship or retribution. Under the anti-trafficking law, the government offered all identified foreign trafficking victims relief from deportation, and victims had the right to free legal aid to assist them in engaging in civil and criminal proceedings against their traffickers. The anti-trafficking law also allowed victims and witnesses of trafficking crimes access to psychological and physical protection services" (474).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"Tunisia’s anti-trafficking law, Organic Law 2016-61, enacted in July 2016, criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking and prescribed penalties of 10 years’ imprisonment and a fine of 50,000 Tunisian dinar (TND) ($16,620) for offenses involving adult victims and 15 years’ imprisonment and a fine of 50,000-100,000 TND ($16,620-$33,230) for those involving child victims. These penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with penalties prescribed for other serious crimes, such as kidnapping" (473).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"The government offered foreign trafficking victims legal alternatives to their removal to countries where they might face hardship or retribution. Under the anti-trafficking law, the government offered all identified foreign trafficking victims relief from deportation, and victims had the right to free legal aid to assist them in engaging in civil and criminal proceedings against their traffickers. The anti-trafficking law also allowed victims and witnesses of trafficking crimes access to psychological and physical protection services" (474).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Tunisia, and traffickers exploit victims from Tunisia abroad. Some Tunisian children are vulnerable to forced labor and sex trafficking in Tunisia. Some Tunisian girls working as domestic servants for wealthy families in Tunis and major coastal cities are highly vulnerable to trafficking, experiencing restrictions on movement, physical and psychological violence, and sexual abuse (...) Civil society and international organizations continue to report an increase in women, primarily from West Africa and increasingly from Cote d’Ivoire, who are exploited in domestic servitude in private homes in Tunis, Sfax, Sousse, and Gabes (...) An NGO reported in...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Tunisia does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Tunisia remained on Tier 2. These efforts included an increase in prosecutions of alleged traffickers under the anti-trafficking law; proactive identification of trafficking victims; and implementation of a pilot program for the national victim referral mechanism, which resulted in more victims receiving care. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in some key areas. The government did not provide sufficient training for security forces and border control agents to identify potential...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"Between April 2018 and January 2019, the government reported that the National Authority identified 780 trafficking victims from among the potential victims referred to it by government agencies and civil society organizations. The MOI identified 383 trafficking victims. Additionally, child protection specialists from MWFC identified 709 potential trafficking victims among the 10,000 child abuse cases it received in 2018. The MOH also identified 69 potential trafficking victims of sexual and economic exploitation, forced begging, and domestic servitude among patients that received services from the MOH" (473).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, D R Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zimbabwe
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

4.0
Aug. 3, 2019, 7:10 p.m.
Countries: Botswana, Morocco, Rwanda, Tunisia
Variables: POLY-LAW-1

"Polygamy is prohibited in Botswana, Rwanda and Tunisia, and highly restricted in Morocco, and so women who marry into these arrangements have no legal protection" (10)
June 28, 2019, 7:46 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2

"The Ministry of Women, Family, and Childhood designated 21 psychologists to treat victims and announced its collaboration with civil society to provide increased services for child victims in shelters in Sousse, Sfax, and Tunis" (p. 24).
June 28, 2019, 7:46 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2, DV-LAW-1

"Laws prohibiting domestic violence provide penalties for assault committed by a spouse or family member that are double those of an unrelated individual for the same crime, but enforcement was rare, and domestic violence remained a serious problem. The new law strengthens the penalties for domestic violence and allows women to seek restraining orders against their abusers without filing a criminal case or filing for divorce" (p. 22).
June 28, 2019, 7:46 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2, IIP-LAW-2

"In the new gender-based violence law, the article related to sexual harassment was revised. It allows up to a two-year sentence for the harasser and a 5,000-dinar ($2,040) fine, instead of the previous one year in prison. The law further clarifies that sexual harassment can include any act, gesture, or words with sexual connotation. The punishment is doubled if the victim is a child or the perpetrator has authority over the victim" (p. 22).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: ISSA-DATA-2

"The ratio of boy-to-girl births was 107 to 100" (p. 23).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2, DV-PRACTICE-2

"There were no government public education programs on domestic violence, including rape. Victims received services at two dozen social centers throughout the country" (p. 22).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-5

"On September 14, the government cancelled the 1973 decree law that prevented the marriage of Muslim female citizens with non-Muslim men unless the men presented proof of conversion to Islam. Sharia requires men, but not women, to provide for their families. Because of this expectation, in some instances sharia inheritance law provides men with a larger share of an inheritance" (p. 23).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRW-LAW-1, LRCM-LAW-2, ERBG-LAW-2, IIP-LAW-2, DV-LAW-1

"On June 27, parliament unanimously passed a comprehensive law addressing all forms of gender-based violence, including physical, economic, and social violence. It broadly defines violence against women as 'any restriction denying women equality in the civil, political, economic, social, or cultural domains.' The law, which enjoyed widespread support from both political parties and civil society organizations, adds or updates articles in the Penal Code to meet international best practices. The law criminalizes previously uncovered acts of incest, sexual harassment of women in public places, and gender discrimination" (p. 22).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: IW-LAW-1

"NonMuslim women and their Muslim husbands may not inherit from each other" (p. 23).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: AOM-LAW-1

"The minimum age for marriage for both sexes is 18, but the courts may, in certain situations, authorize the marriage of persons younger than 18 upon the request and approval of both parents" (p. 24).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-1

"Women in the private sector earned on average one-quarter less than men for similar work" (p. 23).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRW-LAW-2

"Anyone who has sexual relations with a girl under age 10 is subject to the death penalty... Under previous laws, intercourse with a girl under the age of 15 without the use of violence was punishable by six years in prison; the new law raised the age of consent to 16 and removed a clause in the legal code that allowed the court to drop the charges of sex with a minor if the perpetrator agreed to marry the victim, with the approval of her parents" (p. 24).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: CLCW-LAW-2

"There is no discrimination between a mother and father regarding passport application and authorization to leave the country" (p. 23).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: FSCB-PRACTICE-1

"There were no reports of coerced abortion, involuntary sterilization, or other coercive population control methods" (p. 22).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"As of October the government reported that police officers received 398 complaints of violence and 570 of sexual assaults against children" (p. 23).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"The law explicitly requires equal pay for equal work, and the government generally enforced it. The law allows female employees in the public sector to receive twothirds of their full-time salary for half-time work" (p. 23).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Citizenship is derived by birth from one’s parents, and the law provides for a period of 10 days to register a newborn… Female citizens can transmit citizenship on an equal basis with male citizens, and there is no discrimination between a mother and father regarding passport application and authorization to leave the country" (p. 23).
June 28, 2019, 7:45 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: GP-DATA-3

Theres is "The Ministry of Women, Family, and Childhood" (p. 24).
May 15, 2019, 6:51 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Armenia, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Central African Rep, China, Cote D'Ivoire, Cyprus, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, Mongolia, Niger, Pakistan, Qatar, Russia, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Syria, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan
Variables: GP-SCALE-1

3.0
April 30, 2019, 5:44 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Since September 2017, Tunisian women are free to marry non-Muslims. President Beji Caid Essebsi repealed a circular dated to 1973, inspired by the country's Muslim traditions that previously required non-Muslim men to convert to Islam in order to marry a Muslim woman. Only then the country's Mufti would allow the marriage to take place." (para 2). "Despite the change in legislation, the fight over inter-religious marriages is not over yet as many women have recently stumbled on problems when trying to marry outside of Islam." (para 3). ""The whole problem was that we couldn't find in Hammamet a notary who was willing to marry us," Zeineb said recalling the first...more
April 30, 2019, 5:44 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-1

"Monia Ben Jemia, feminist and former head of the Tunisian Association of Democratic Women (ATFD), long campaigned for the revocation of the 1973 administrative order." (para 25). ""We considered the circular illegal because the Personal Status Code doesn't forbid in any way a Muslim woman to marry a non-Muslim," voiced the AFTD's former president." (para 26). "Human rights groups in Tunisia have demanded that the new law be applied more strictly and efficiently." (para 28). "The Tunisian Association for the Support of Minorities (ATSM) urged the ministry of justice to adopt measures against those who continue to use the old circular to forbid mixed marriages." (para 29).