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Latest items for Tunisia

Jan. 12, 2018, 8:46 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon, Palestine, Tunisia
Variables: GP-DATA-3

"Egypt would not be the first Arab country to establish a Ministry for Women’s Affairs. Other countries, such as Tunisia, Lebanon and Palestine already took this step" (para 2).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1

"Violence against women is shockingly high, with the Tunisian Association of Democratic Women reporting that almost 70% of Tunisian women are victims of abuse" (para 4).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"in mid-September of this year, Essebsi revoked the 1973 administrative order and gave women the right to marry outside of the Muslim faith" (para 5). "On July 26, the Tunisian parliament passed the Law on Eliminating Violence Against Women, which introduces criminal provisions and penalties for perpetrators of domestic violence, and includes provisions to prevent child labor, sexual harassment in public places, and pay discrimination" (para 6).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: MARR-LAW-1

"Since 1956, the Code of Personal Status (CSP), granted equality in divorce proceedings and established the necessity of a minimum age and mutual consent in marriage" (para 3). "An administrative order dating back to 1973 forbade Muslim Tunisian women from marrying non-Muslims (though Tunisian men were not subject to this restriction)" (para 4). "in mid-September of this year, Essebsi revoked the 1973 administrative order and gave women the right to marry outside of the Muslim faith" (para 5).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-1

"Since 1956, the Code of Personal Status (CSP), granted equality in divorce proceedings and established the necessity of a minimum age and mutual consent in marriage, as well as codifying women’s rights to work" (para 3).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRW-LAW-4

"Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab Spring, was also the first to repeal the 'marry the rapist' laws" (para 2).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"On July 26, the Tunisian parliament passed the Law on Eliminating Violence Against Women, which introduces criminal provisions and penalties for perpetrators of domestic violence" (para 6).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LO-LAW-1, IIP-LAW-1

"Since 1956, the Code of Personal Status (CSP), granted equality in divorce proceedings and established the necessity of a minimum age and mutual consent in marriage, as well as codifying women’s rights to work, move, open bank accounts, and start businesses" (para 3).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"In 2015, Amnesty International called on the Tunisian government to pass laws recognizing martial rape" (para 4).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: CONST-LAW-1

"Article 21 of the 2014 Tunisian constitution stipulated that: 'Male and female citizens are equal in rights and duties. They are equal before the law without any discrimination'" (para 3).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Now, Essebsi is confronting Sharia law itself. In an August 2017 speech—on National Women’s Day—he affirmed that the Tunisian state must acknowledge the rights of women. 'We must state that we are moving toward equality between them in every sphere,' he said. 'And the whole issue hinges on the matter of inheritance'" (para 7). "Traditional religious leaders point to text in the Quran indicating that daughters can inherit only half of the inheritance received by sons. Regional leaders have been reluctant to take on this issue, because doing so would mean confronting the way traditional religious leaders have viewed this issue. 'Essebsi’s proposals oppose sharia,' claimed Abbas Shuman, director of ...more
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: MARR-LAW-5

"An administrative order dating back to 1973 forbade Muslim Tunisian women from marrying non-Muslims (though Tunisian men were not subject to this restriction)" (para 4). "in mid-September of this year, Essebsi revoked the 1973 administrative order and gave women the right to marry outside of the Muslim faith" (para 5).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: IIP-LAW-2

"On July 26, the Tunisian parliament passed the Law on Eliminating Violence Against Women, which introduces criminal provisions and penalties for perpetrators of domestic violence, and includes provisions to prevent child labor, sexual harassment in public places" (para 6).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: SMES-DATA-3

"Today in Egypt, one-third of Egyptian households are headed by women" (para 9).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: ATDW-LAW-1, ATDW-LAW-5

"Since 1956, the Code of Personal Status (CSP), granted equality in divorce proceedings" (para 3).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: ERBG-LAW-2

"On July 26, the Tunisian parliament passed the Law on Eliminating Violence Against Women, which introduces criminal provisions and penalties for perpetrators of domestic violence, and includes provisions to prevent child labor, sexual harassment in public places, and pay discrimination" (para 6).
Jan. 8, 2018, 10:24 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: DSFMF-LAW-1

"In 2015, Amnesty International called on the Tunisian government to pass laws recognizing martial rape and eliminate those criminalizing sexual relations between consenting, unmarried adults" (para 4).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: DV-DATA-1

"In 2010, Tunisia’s National Board for Family and Population conducted a survey concerning the prevalence of domestic violence, and they found that 47.6 percent of women between the ages of 18 and 64 had experienced at least one episode of domestic violence in their lives" (para 4).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: RCDW-LAW-1

"In addressing the issue of gender-based violence in its electoral platform, Al-Nahda specifically states that it will 'combat all forms of violence against women, and oppose compulsory dress code among women' in its platform" (para 3) (Coder comment: Al-Nahda is the moderate Islamist party - ARR).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Created in 1981, Al-Nahda is a moderate Islamist party that was inspired by the Muslim Brotherhood. However, Al-Nahda is more moderate than the Muslim Brotherhood, and it maintains that dialogue and political pluralism are key to successful Tunisian politics. . . . In addressing the issue of gender-based violence in its electoral platform, Al-Nahda specifically states that it will 'combat all forms of violence against women, and oppose compulsory dress code among women' in its platform. Interestingly, the question of gender-based violence emerged in the parliament in 2014, and Al-Nahda, along with other parties, had to address it. In 2010, Tunisia’s National Board for Family and Population conducted a survey ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: GP-DATA-3

"In response, the Ministry of Women and Family Affairs in 2014 created a draft bill criminalizing domestic violence" (para 4). "It is important to note that the Ministry of Women and Family Affairs developed the draft law with the input of civil society activists" (para 5).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-1

"The draft law was approved in July 2016, though it has yet to go into effect" (para 4). "The law appears to be a significant improvement in legal protection from domestic violence" (para 6).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: DV-LAW-1

"In response, the Ministry of Women and Family Affairs in 2014 created a draft bill criminalizing domestic violence. Al-Nahda supported the bill, stating that the party does not view protecting women from injury as contradicting Islamic law. The draft law was approved in July 2016, though it has yet to go into effect. Its provisions include prohibiting all forms of violence against women (physical, psychological, sexual or economic), and issuing prison sentences or financial penalties should the law be broken. The law criminalizes marital rape, ends impunity for rapists who marry their victims and also criminalizes sexual harassment, with either imprisonment or financial penalty as the consequence. The penalty for ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRCM-LAW-2

"The law criminalizes marital rape, ends impunity for rapists who marry their victims and also criminalizes sexual harassment, with either imprisonment or financial penalty as the consequence. The penalty for these transgressions largely appears to be imprisonment for differing degrees of time (with increased severity if the victim is a family member), rather than a protective measure, such as a restraining order" (para 4).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

"In response, the Ministry of Women and Family Affairs in 2014 created a draft bill criminalizing domestic violence. Al-Nahda supported the bill, stating that the party does not view protecting women from injury as contradicting Islamic law. The draft law was approved in July 2016, though it has yet to go into effect. Its provisions include prohibiting all forms of violence against women (physical, psychological, sexual or economic), and issuing prison sentences or financial penalties should the law be broken. The law criminalizes marital rape, ends impunity for rapists who marry their victims and also criminalizes sexual harassment, with either imprisonment or financial penalty as the consequence. The penalty for ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRW-PRACTICE-2, DV-PRACTICE-2

"Many Tunisian women face practical challenges in bringing their cases to court due to patriarchal social norms and economic constraints" (para 6).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-2

"In 2010, Tunisia’s National Board for Family and Population conducted a survey concerning the prevalence of domestic violence, and . . . in response, the Ministry of Women and Family Affairs in 2014 created a draft bill criminalizing domestic violence. . . . It is important to note that the Ministry of Women and Family Affairs developed the draft law with the input of civil society activists, who participated in the form of creating training workshops and forging coalition partnerships from the onset of this endeavor. As such, their expertise was incorporated into the development of the law" (para 4-5). "It would be inappropriate to give either party full credit ...more
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRW-LAW-4

"The law criminalizes marital rape, ends impunity for rapists who marry their victims" (para 4).
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: LRW-LAW-2, DV-LAW-2

"The draft law was approved in July 2016, though it has yet to go into effect. Its provisions include prohibiting all forms of violence against women (physical, psychological, sexual or economic), and issuing prison sentences or financial penalties should the law be broken. The law criminalizes marital rape, ends impunity for rapists who marry their victims and also criminalizes sexual harassment, with either imprisonment or financial penalty as the consequence. The penalty for these transgressions largely appears to be imprisonment for differing degrees of time (with increased severity if the victim is a family member), rather than a protective measure, such as a restraining order" (para 4).more
Dec. 20, 2017, 11:56 a.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: RISW-PRACTICE-1

"The Ministry of Women and Family Affairs in 2014 created a draft bill criminalizing domestic violence . . . The draft law was approved in July 2016, though it has yet to go into effect" (para 4).