The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Uganda

Dec. 14, 2017, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: INFIB-DATA-2

"FGM is practiced by approximately 1 percent of the Ugandan population. Yet among the Sabiny, Pokot and Tepeth communities, in Uganda’s east and north-east, the prevalence is more than 90 per cent" (para 8).
Dec. 14, 2017, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: INFIB-LAW-1

"In 2010, the Uganda Government passed the Prohibition of FGM Act, which criminalized the practice" (para 10).
Dec. 14, 2017, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: INFIB-PRACTICE-1

"At the time, she believed it was her calling as a member of the Sebei ethnic group. People in her family have been circumcisers for generations" (para 2). “At first I was trained as a mentor, guiding young girls and preparing them for cutting the night before, and encouraging them to be strong and ready,” Ms. Chelangat, now 77, told UNFPA. “I was told I had to keep our culture alive" (para 3). "FGM is typically carried out without anaesthesia and using crude instruments. It is often performed without the consent of the person being cut. It is internationally recognized as a violation of women’s and girls’ rights" (para 5). ...more
Dec. 14, 2017, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: NGOFW-PRACTICE-1

"The UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting, which is funded in part by the European Commission, works with communities to help end FGM, raising awareness about its dangers among community leaders, religious leaders, women and the elderly. It has also helped countries strengthen the laws and policies prohibiting the practice" (para 9).
Dec. 13, 2017, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: MURDER-DATA-1

"Eight children have been saved this year from child sacrifice. When they were abducted, the community responded" (para 14).
Dec. 13, 2017, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"World Vision’s Amber Alert-style programis taking on child sacrifice in Uganda. The program is ingenious in the way it has created a radical partnership between leaders of all faiths, law enforcement, local government, child protection committees, and traditional healers" (para 11). "This diverse group has reached out with the message that stopping child sacrifice is everyone’s responsibility. Faith leaders have created a radio program that airs messages about child sacrifice, good parenting, and taking care of one’s neighbors. Betty Nandawula, a Catholic, and Umar Mukisa, a Muslim, co-host a live call-in program about family relationships, taking on topics such as domestic violence and parenting. The traditional healers have started their ...more
Dec. 13, 2017, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: NGOFW-PRACTICE-1

"World Vision’s Amber Alert-style program is taking on child sacrifice in Uganda. The program is ingenious in the way it has created a radical partnership between leaders of all faiths, law enforcement, local government, child protection committees, and traditional healers" (para 11)."World Vision goes to the same efforts, helping parents in Uganda protect their children through the Amber Alert" (para 19).
Dec. 13, 2017, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: WAM-PRACTICE-1

"This diverse group has reached out with the message that stopping child sacrifice is everyone’s responsibility. Faith leaders have created a radio program that airs messages about child sacrifice, good parenting, and taking care of one’s neighbors. Betty Nandawula, a Catholic, and Umar Mukisa, a Muslim, co-host a live call-in program about family relationships, taking on topics such as domestic violence and parenting. The traditional healers have started their own radio program, trying to protect children and to ferret out the witch doctors who kill them" (para 12).
Dec. 13, 2017, 9:35 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1

"Witchcraft is in plain sight here in Buikwe, a district east of the capital city, Kampala" (para 5)."Abductors are middlemen between people desperate — for money, to bear children, or to rid their bodies of disease. Witch doctors convince them that only a child’s body part, such as the head, the fingers, or the private parts, mixed with traditional medicine, will cure the problem. Ritual demands that the parts be removed while the child is still alive and conscious" (para 8)."Abductors prey on vulnerable families, like Trevor’s, waiting until the child is alone to abduct them" (para 10). "World Vision’s Amber Alert-style program is taking on child sacrifice in Uganda. ...more
Nov. 30, 2017, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Argentina, Benin, Bhutan, Burundi, Chile, Congo, Cote D'Ivoire, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, Malta, Nicaragua, Panama, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Vietnam
Variables: LRW-LAW-1

According to AgeOfConsent's data, the legal age of consent is 18 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Nov. 28, 2017, 8:31 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"Faith leaders have created a radio program that airs messages about child sacrifice, good parenting, and taking care of one’s neighbors. Betty Nandawula, a Catholic, and Umar Mukisa, a Muslim, co-host a live call-in program about family relationships, taking on topics such as domestic violence and parenting" (para 13).
Nov. 28, 2017, 8:31 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-1

"Two years ago, David and his little sister, Sharon, were brushing their teeth under a coffee plant in the front yard. That’s when the strangers approached. 'Two men came here and started calling us,' says David. 'I told Sharon to run. I ran.' He points down a path that leads to more homes. Sharon, a toddler, could not keep up. The men captured her, pressing chloroform to her face to silence her cries. Child sacrifice is an abomination. Abductors are middlemen between people desperate — for money, to bear children, or to rid their bodies of disease. Witch doctors convince them that only a child’s body part, such as the ...more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:05 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: IM-DATA-1

"Although the study recognises that the rates of death among children under five have more than halved in LDCs since 1990" (para 5). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:04 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

"Women in LDCs are also more vulnerable to unemployment than men – 84.1% to 71.4%" (para 9). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:04 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-2

"While the prevalence of women using modern contraceptives in LDCs rose from 15% in 1994 to almost 34% in 2015, it lags well behind the global average of 64%" (para 9). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia ...more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:03 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"the fertility rate is falling – from 6.2 children in 1985-90 to 4.3 in 2010-12 – it says LDCs need to do more to anticipate the approaching phase of accelerated development" (para 5). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, ...more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:03 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: MARR-PRACTICE-1

"As of 2010, more than half of the women in LDCs aged 20-24 were married before they were 18; in some countries, the figure was 70%" (para 8). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia (TPJ - CODER ...more
Nov. 9, 2017, 9:02 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Rep, Chad, Comoros, D R Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia
Variables: AOM-PRACTICE-1

"As of 2010, more than half of the women in LDCs aged 20-24 were married before they were 18; in some countries, the figure was 70%" (para 8). The 48 least developed countries (LCDs) according to the UN are: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Fast, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kirbati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia (TPJ - CODER ...more
Nov. 2, 2017, 4:37 p.m.
Countries: Malawi, Uganda, Zambia
Variables: SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"At the recently ended United Nations General Assembly, President Edgar Lungu of Zambia, President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda and President Peter Mutharika of Malawi pledged to support efforts in ending child marriage in Africa by 2030" (para 9).
Oct. 26, 2017, 4:35 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan, Uganda
Variables: MURDER-PRACTICE-2

"In the last 15 years, it has been estimated that more than 3,200 acid-throwing attacks were recorded in countries as varied as Bangladesh, Britain, Colombia, Pakistan and Uganda, totaling an estimated 3,500 victims in that time period" (para 1).
Sept. 25, 2017, 8:22 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-6

12.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LO-SCALE-3

3.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 8:51 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LO-SCALE-2

1.0
Sept. 1, 2017, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LO-SCALE-1

2.0
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1

“When making suggestions for addressing the issues facing girls, the women in Kampala emphasised the need for income-generating activities for girls that differed from the traditional ones, such as tailoring, since they believed that girls could no longer make a living this way” (para 32).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: NGOFW-DATA-3

“This issue of decision-making and inclusion were often highlighted by girls in all five cities. … Often because of no fault of their own, in each of the cities girls are relegated to passive observers or beneficiaries of the system rather than being consulted and valued as the agents of change” (27). “We even have youth committees in Kalungu [Uganda] that we as girls head. The girls from my community are given a listening ear and therefore that is why most of us from that area have a very high self-esteem” (27).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

“In all of the cities, girls said that they did not feel included in decision-making processes at home or in the community at large” (28). “Girls in Kampala mentioned not having a voice in the decisions that affect them, citing examples of parents who decided to take them out of school. Young women who were married went on to explain that this attitude towards them continues in their marriage where they felt they had to obey the decisions taken by their husbands without question” (28). “In Kampala, adolescent girls in the district of Kasubi were not a part of any decision making process in their families or their communities. ‘They ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1

“Their [adolescent girls’] worlds tended to revolve mainly around their families, especially their mothers and friends, and the places they go are usually limited to their homes, school or work, market places, and mosques” (20). “In Kampala, 80% of girls reported feeling ‘very unsafe’ or ‘unsafe’ in public spaces. Girls outlined that they feel particularly unsafe in markets, roads, recreational centres, and other urban spaces due to high incidents of rape and theft. Girls felt unsafe when they were moving through the city – when using public transportation, when walking, and when using passenger taxis and motorcycles (boda-boda)” (21). “The issue of lighting clearly emerged as the most tangible element ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-2

“Lack of proper and adequate basic services, such as drainage systems and garbage collection, can limit walking paths and cause girls to feel unsafe. Girls in Kampala, Cairo, Delhi and Lima all commented on how piles of garbage can block their paths or cause drains to overflow, limiting the space they have to move through. The girls explained that they felt vulnerable in such situations since men and boys take advantage of them by pressing themselves against them, groping them or sexually harassing them as they passed by. This is also connected to girls being able to escape and get help – the third principle of girls’ safety – since ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

“In Kampala, girls commented that in areas with security guards and police, they could not always trust them because they sometimes cause harm to girls, and they sometimes report to duty intoxicated” (26). “The girls’ maps in … Kampala included greater police presence than on the boys’ maps. When asked about this, the adolescent boys in Kampala pointed to a different form of gender discrimination and explained that they felt that the police often unnecessarily targeted them, so for them, the police represented a source of insecurity and they chose to remove police posts from their ideal city maps” (32).