The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for Uganda

Feb. 11, 2020, 2:45 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

"The network is piloting a social tenure domain model in Uganda. It is using a survey, GPS system and a database to gather and analyse information, mapping community structures and facilities, family information, supporting documents and photos, and producing reports of the community and their land tenure situation. Part of the process is to build the capacity of the community in Uganda to input and update this system. The occupants are given a "certificate of residency" in recognition of their history within the space which gives them an address to access other services. Though it does not grant full land ownership, the certificate can be used to start a conversation...more
Feb. 11, 2020, 2:29 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"On a positive note, women's increased access to education, capacity to earn higher incomes and participation in the decision making process has created changes in power relations at all levels. There is also need for society to continuously address the paradox premised on the fact that women are not considered as decision makers when it pertains to land and yet women's labour is key to productivity" (para. 11).
Feb. 11, 2020, 2:29 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LO-PRACTICE-1

"Before colonial rule, land ownership and access took diverse forms, some were vested in lineages, clans and families, with males exercising day-today control. Historically, women had traditional protection that ensured continued access after separation, divorce or widowhood. There were also traditional means of arbitration which could be used if this access was contested. Subsequent colonial rule encouraged privatisation and subdivision of land, held under individual freehold titles. In some parts of Africa, land was left under communal ownership, managed by customary leaders. At independence some African governments such as Tanzania proclaimed state ownership of all land whereas in others like Uganda, private ownership existed alongside customary ownership. Overtime, factors such...more
Feb. 11, 2020, 2:29 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: WR-PRACTICE-2

"In the case of land titling, this policy was expected to assist women secure legal rights to properties that they owned or inherited. In some parts of East and southern Africa, land titling has not facilitated women to secure legal rights to land because where this practice has been adopted; it was mainly men who got their names on the documents because they were deemed to be the "household heads". Widows lucky enough to get land were allocated the smallest pieces of land. Another remedy aimed at ensuring women's access to land was premised on historical considerations whereby a woman has always been guaranteed of the right to use land...more
Feb. 11, 2020, 2:29 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LO-LAW-1

"The Constitution provides for the right for men and women to own property individually or jointly. There is need for increased awareness of equal rights to property countrywide and establishment of institutions responsible for implementing land laws. Land tribunals which are already established by law could be used to decentralise the operations of the Administrator General." (para. 12-13).
Dec. 18, 2019, 5:05 p.m.
Countries: Albania, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chad, Costa Rica, Cote D'Ivoire, Croatia, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Macedonia, Madagascar, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Qatar, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Solomon Islands, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: TRAFF-SCALE-1

2.0
Dec. 7, 2019, 10:53 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LBHO-PRACTICE-2

"Other East African countries certainly have issues in terms of how women politicians are viewed and treated by their male peers. There are many who argue that leaders like Paul Kagame in Rwanda and Yoweri Museveni in Uganda court women as a political bloc, because they view them as more malleable or susceptible to influence. But the fact remains that these leaders interact with women as a political force to be reckoned with. Women are part of the conversation in these countries in a way that they are not in Kenya and Somalia" (6).
Dec. 7, 2019, 10:43 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LBHO-DATA-1

"Proportions of women in parliament in East Africa … Uganda at 33.5 percent" (3).
Oct. 18, 2019, 3:05 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Guyana, Iceland, Iraq, Italy, Kazakhstan, Laos, Latvia, Macedonia, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, South Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tanzania, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom, Vietnam, Zimbabwe
Variables: GP-SCALE-2

1.0
Oct. 18, 2019, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Angola, Bahamas, Benin, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Congo, D R Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea-Bissau, Iceland, Laos, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, North Korea, Peru, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Variables: ERBG-SCALE-1

0.0
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The 2009 anti-trafficking act criminalized sex trafficking and labor trafficking, and prescribed punishments of up to 15 years’ imprisonment for offenses involving adult victims and up to life imprisonment for those involving child victims. These penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with those prescribed for other serious crimes, such as kidnapping. The law also criminalized the use of a child in any armed conflict and prescribed penalties of up to the death penalty. The Children Amendment Act of 2016 conflicted with the 2009 anti-trafficking act in some respects—for example, it defined child sex trafficking to require force, fraud, or coercion, which was inconsistent with the...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:40 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-3

"Ugandan law permitted foreign trafficking victims to remain in Uganda during the investigation of their cases and to apply for residence and work permits, but the government did not report any victims applying for such benefits during the reporting period (...) While the 2009 anti-trafficking act prohibits the penalization of trafficking victims for unlawful acts committed as a direct result of being subjected to human trafficking, reports from prior years indicated that the government detained and placed on bond some trafficking victims, including children, in an attempt to compel them to cooperate with and periodically report to law enforcement in support of criminal investigations" (481).
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-2

"As reported over the past five years, human traffickers exploit domestic and foreign victims in Uganda, and traffickers exploit victims from Uganda abroad (…) Traffickers exploit girls and boys in prostitution. Recruiters target girls and women aged 13-24 years for domestic sex trafficking, especially near sports tournaments and road construction projects (...) Reportedly, traffickers, called 'elders,' force the children to beg on the streets and exploit the girls in child sex trafficking via prostitution around age 12; the children are forced to relinquish all proceeds and if the child does not earn his or her quota each day, he or she may be beaten or starved (...) Young women remained...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1

"The Government of Uganda does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking but is making significant efforts to do so. The government demonstrated overall increasing efforts compared to the previous reporting period; therefore Uganda remained on Tier 2. These efforts included training more law enforcement officials and investigating and prosecuting more cases than in the previous year. The government approved and published the 2009 anti-trafficking act’s implementing regulations and established a trafficking-specific desk in the Directorate of Public Prosecutions (DPP). The government also investigated and delicensed more fraudulent labor recruitment companies. However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government...more
Oct. 16, 2019, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: TRAFF-DATA-1

"The government reported identifying at least 214 victims in 2018, as compared with 276 in 2017. Of the 214 trafficking victims, 27 children and 149 adults were victims of forced labor, and 18 children and 15 adults were victims of sex trafficking. The government also identified five adults who were victims of both sex trafficking and forced labor. Of the identified victims, 182 were transnational and 32 were internal; most of the internal victims were children" (481).
Sept. 20, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Cuba, Dominican Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Georgia, Ghana, Indonesia, Israel, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Libya, Lithuania, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Suriname, Trinidad/Tobago, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia
Variables: MULTIVAR-SCALE-1

3.0
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: MABFC-DATA-1

"The median age at first birth among women age 20-49 in Uganda is 19.4 years, and the median age at first birth among women age 25-49 is 19.2 years (Table 5.9)" (89).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: AOM-DATA-1

"On average, women marry more than 4 years earlier than men. The median age at first marriage is 18.7 years among women age 25-49 and 23.3 years among men age 25-49" (71).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: CRPLB-PRACTICE-1

"Almost all women (97%) age 15-49 with a live birth in the past 5 years received antenatal care (ANC) from a skilled provider during their most recent pregnancy. However, only 29% of women had their first ANC visit during the first trimester of pregnancy. Sixty percent completed at least four ANC visits" (141). "Most women who attended ANC for their most recent pregnancy in the past 5 years had a blood sample taken (93%), were weighed (88%), and had their blood pressure measured (72%); they were less likely to have a urine sample taken (39%)" (141). "More than 7 in 10 live births in the past 5 years were delivered...more
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: IRP-PRACTICE-3

"Among men who paid for sex in the past 12 months, almost three quarters (73%) reported using a condom during the last paid sexual intercourse" (251).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: ISTD-DATA-3

"In 2016, an estimated 1.4 million adults and children were living with HIV in Uganda" (247).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: PPWA-DATA-1

"One-third (32%) of women age 15-49 have some degree of anaemia. One quarter (25%) are mildly anaemic, 6% are moderately anaemic, and 1% are severely anaemic (Table 11.13.1). Sixteen percent of men age 15-49 are anaemic (Table 11.13.2)" (204). "Pregnant (38%) and breastfeeding women (34%) are more likely to be anaemic than women who are neither pregnant nor breastfeeding (30%). Pregnant women have a lower prevalence of mild anaemia (19%) than women who are breastfeeding (29%) and those who are neither pregnant nor breastfeeding (25%); however, they have a higher prevalence of moderate anaemia (18%) than other women (4-5%)" (204).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LR-DATA-1

"Nearly 7 in 10 women (68%) and 8 in 10 men (79%) are literate" (45).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: CWC-DATA-2

"Urban women (5.6 years) and men (6.1 years) spend longer in school than rural women (2.9 years) and men (3.5 years)" (16). "Urban women are more educated than their rural counterparts. Five percent of urban women have no education, as compared with 11% of rural women. Seventeen percent of urban women have more than a secondary education, compared with 5% of rural women" (46). "Respondents living in urban areas are more likely to be literate than those living in rural areas, and the gap in literacy rates between women and men is higher in rural than in urban areas. Eighty-four percent of urban women and 86% of urban men are...more
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Among currently married women age 15-49 with cash earnings, 9 in 10 (91%) participate in decisions about the use of their earnings; five of them (53%) make decisions on their own, and four (38%) make decisions jointly with their husband" (275). "Half (51%) of currently married women age 15-49 participate in three specific household decisions either alone or jointly with their husbands. Women are more likely to participate in decisions about their own health care (74%) and visits to their family or relatives (72%) than in decisions about making major household purchases (64%)" (275). "Eight percent each of both currently married men age 15-49 with cash earnings and currently married...more
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: SAB-DATA-2

"Almost all (98%) children born in the 2 years before the survey were breastfed at some point; two-thirds (66%) of children under age 6 months are exclusively breastfed" (193).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: SAB-DATA-3

"The median duration of breastfeeding among children born in the 3 years before the 2016 UDHS is 19.8 months (Table 11.5); half of all children have stopped breastfeeding before they are age 20 months(Table 11.3). The median duration of exclusive breastfeeding is 4.0 months, and the median duration of predominant breastfeeding (either exclusive breastfeeding or breastfeeding plus water and/or other nonmilk liquids) is 4.9 months (Table 11.5)" (193).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: ERBG-DATA-2

"Seventy-three percent of women age 15-49 are currently employed, as compared with 92% of men age 15-49" (45).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: DACH-DATA-1

"Adult mortality is higher among men (5.95 deaths per 1,000 population) than among women (3.78 deaths per 1,000 population)" (307).
July 8, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: LO-DATA-3

"Just under 4 in 10 (38%) women age 15-49 own a house, and 3 in 10 (31%) own land" (278). "Eight in 10 women (81%) and men (80%) age 15-49 who own a house do not possess a title or deed for that house (Table 14.5.1 and Table 14.5.2); nearly 7 in 10 women and men (69% each) age 15-49 who own land do not possess a title or deed for that land (Table 14.6.1 and Table 14.6.2)" (278).