The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for AFE-DATA-1

Sept. 12, 2018, 9:50 p.m.
Countries: Eritrea
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"In rural areas parents did not enroll young girls as commonly in school as they did young boys, but the percentage of girls in school continued to increase" (para 112)
Sept. 5, 2018, 9:59 a.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Girls represented approximately half of all those enrolled in primary school but were absent more often than boys due to household duties. At the secondary level, boys represented a disproportionally high percentage of enrolled students, and child marriage and pregnancy often prevented girls from finishing school" (24).
Sept. 5, 2018, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"The government reported that 95 percent of citizen women pursued higher education after high school, and women constituted more than 70 percent of government university students" (23).
Sept. 5, 2018, 9:44 a.m.
Countries: Vanuatu
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Boys tended to receive more education than did girls. Although attendance rates were similar in early primary grades, proportionately fewer girls advanced to higher grades" (12).
Sept. 5, 2018, 9:39 a.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"There were substantial differences in the education profile of men and women at postsecondary level. In higher education the number of female students enrolled in applied technology programs was much smaller than the number of men enrolled" (41).
Sept. 4, 2018, 11:28 a.m.
Countries: Zimbabwe
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"According to the DHS, 94 percent of girls and 90 percent of boys between ages 10 and 14 attended primary school. School attendance was only slightly higher in urban than in rural areas, and enrollment for children older than 14 was in decline. Relatively high and increasing school fees were the main reason for lack of attendance after age 14, particularly affecting girls ages 17 and 18. Only 52 percent of girls age 17 attended school, compared with 64 percent of boys. Reports that schools turned away students with unpaid fees continued" (36).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"School attendance rates were lower for girls than for boys, and the dropout rate was higher for girls" (11).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Illiteracy among citizen women largely was eliminated, and women made up 83 percent of higher education students" (18).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"A gender gap in education persisted with a reported two-thirds of adolescent girls in rural areas not attending school" (32).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:25 a.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"According to the government’s 2010 Millennium Development Goals report, despite joint government-NGO initiatives in some localities to improve girls’ school attendance, only 27 percent of girls finished primary school, compared with 40 percent of boys" (17).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:21 a.m.
Countries: Madagascar
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"According to UNICEF boys and girls generally had equal access to education, although girls were more likely to drop out during adolescence" (18).
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:19 a.m.
Countries: Laos
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"School enrollment rates for girls were lower than for boys, although the gender disparity continued to decrease. Overall, 17 percent of school-age girls, compared to 11 percent of school-age boys, never attended school" (21).
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“In 2013, 12.8 percent of women aged 25 and older in the United States had not completed high school, and 27.3 percent had a high school diploma or the equivalent as their highest level of educational attainment” (133)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“Between 2000 and 2013, the percentage of women in the United States with a bachelor’s degree or higher increased from 22.8 to 29.7 percent” (xix)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“only 19.6 percent of women aged 65 and older have a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared with 29.9 percent of their male counterparts. Approximately 23.2 percent of women aged 65–74 have at least a bachelor’s degree, compared with 15.3 percent of women aged 75 and older” (142)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“Older women (aged 65 and older) are much less likely than older men to have a bachelor’s degree or higher (19.6 percent of older women compared with 29.9 percent of older men)” (xxi)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“Women who live with a same-sex partner are considerably more likely to hold a bachelor’s or advanced degree (43.7 percent) than married women in different-sex households (34.9 percent) and women who live with a different-sex partner (25.0 percent). Men who live with a same-sex partner are the most likely to hold at least a bachelor’s degree (48.5 percent)” (135)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“While a substantial share of immigrant women hold bachelor’s degrees, three in ten (29.6 percent) have less than a high school diploma. Among the ten largest sending countries, women from Mexico and El Salvador are the most likely to have less than a high school diploma (57.3 and 52.7 percent, respectively). Immigrant women from the Philippines and Canada are the least likely to lack a high school diploma (8.6 and 9.4 percent, respectively)” (131)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“Millennial women aged 25–34 are considerably more likely than millennial men of the same age range to have a bachelor’s degree or higher (36.3 percent compared with 28.3 percent). This difference between millennial women’s and men’s education is much larger than the difference between women and men overall (29.7 percent of women and 29.5 percent of men overall have a bachelor’s degree or higher)” (128)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“Millennial women aged 25 and older are considerably more likely than millennial men to have a bachelor’s degree or higher (36.3 percent of millennial women in the nation overall compared with 28.3 percent of millennial men), yet they are much more likely than their male counterparts to live in poverty (22.4 percent of millennial women aged 16–34 compared with 16.8 percent of millennial men of this age range are poor). Millennial women have the highest poverty rates in Mississippi (33.9 percent) and New Mexico (30.9 percent), and the lowest rates in Alaska and Maryland (14.0 percent each)” (xxi)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“As Figure 4.3 shows, Asian/Pacific Islander women are the most likely to hold a bachelor’s degree or higher (48.4 percent), followed by women who identify with another race or two or more races (32.6 percent) and white women (32.5 percent). Native American and Hispanic women are the least likely to hold at least a bachelor’s degree (15.5 percent and 15.3 percent, respectively). One in three Hispanic women (33.9 percent) has less than a high school diploma; the proportion of Hispanic women with this level of education is approximately twice as large as the proportion of Native American women, the group with the second largest share of women holding the lowest...more
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“The share of women with a bachelor’s degree or higher increased 6.9 percentage points during this [2004-2015], from 22.8 to 29.7 percent” (126)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“More than one in four immigrant women in the United States (27.9 percent) holds a bachelor’s or advanced degree, compared with 30.0 percent of U.S.-born women. Among the ten largest sending countries for female immigrants—Mexico, the Philippines, China, India, Vietnam, Korea, El Salvador, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Canada—immigrant women from India (71.8 percent), the Philippines (51.4 percent), and Korea (46.1 percent) are the most likely to have a bachelor’s degree or higher (IWPR 2015a). Some immigrant women who have college degrees, however, find that their qualifications are not recognized in this country and can find only low-skilled, low-paying jobs” (131)
Aug. 30, 2018, 2:23 p.m.
Countries: East Timor
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Table 1 presents descriptive data for the quantitative survey including the sample of 1193 women. Approximately 1 in 10 (11.3%) of the sample was 25 years or younger, a third (36%) was aged 25–34 years and 23% were 50 years or older (table 1). The majority (69.6%) lived in the rural area, and 87.3% were married. Two-thirds (64.3%) had either never attended school or had completed primary school only, 22% had completed senior high school and 4.7% had obtained a degree or other postschool qualification" (Para 24).
Aug. 28, 2018, 10:03 a.m.
Countries: Mali
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Nevertheless, the Committee remains concerned (see CEDAW/C/MLI/CO/5, para. 27) at the extremely low completion rate for girls at the secondary level. . . . The Committee . . . notes that the crisis in the north has seen 115 schools closed and seriously disrupted the education of some 700,000 children, with a disproportionate impact on girls" (page 9).
Aug. 20, 2018, 11:08 a.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"The Committee is concerned about: (a) The lower number of girls enrolled in pre-primary and primary education compared with boys and the lack of information on girls out of school" (page 9).
Aug. 15, 2018, 9:40 a.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"During recent years the percentage of women which have higher education has increased" (page 24). Table on pages 25-26 breaks down school enrollment of RE students by gender and school level, over 3 school year periods from 2012 to 2014. The data indicate that in 2013/14, the number of female students enrolled in primary, secondary and tertiary education were 725, 45, and 6, respectively, compared to 855, 46, and 9 male students. In 2014/15, the figures were (for primary, secondary, and tertiary, respectively), female: 722, 38, and 8; male: 816, 42, and 9 (page 25-26).
July 11, 2018, 8 p.m.
Countries: Uruguay
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"The Committee welcomes the achievements with regard to women’s access to all levels of education, noting that women complete upper secondary education 30.7 per cent more often than men. It also notes that women account for 60 per cent of all university students" (page 10).
July 6, 2018, 6:49 p.m.
Countries: Uruguay
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"It should be noted that at the ages of 3 or 4 and 13 or 14, the start and end points of basic education, male enrolment is 3 per cent higher than female. After the age of 15, however, female enrolment outstrips male by 4.9 per cent. The gap continues to widen in secondary and tertiary education, a pattern that repeats itself year after year (Table 25). Apart from university education (Tables 26 to 28), high school was the stage where female participation was greatest (53.8 per cent in middle school and 54.9 per cent in upper middle). Males, on the other hand, slightly predominated in primary and initial education...more
June 26, 2018, 7:54 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

In 2011, 58% of 1,864 GMAT examinees were female (2).