The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for AFE-DATA-1

Oct. 17, 2017, 7 a.m.
Countries: Ghana, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Among street vendors in the five cities, men have significantly higher levels of education than women. While nearly one quarter of all women in the sample have no schooling at all, less than 1 per cent of men have no school at all; and more than half (56 per cent) of women have primary education or less, while one quarter of men have primary or less. Education levels are especially low in Ahmedabad, where 60 per cent of the all-female sample has never been to school" (11). This data is based on a survey of street venders that was conducted in Accra Ghana, Ahmedabad, India, Durban, South Africa, Lima, Peru ...more
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Like many women, I always thought that after university and finding some financial stability, I would marry and have children"(para 2)."Conceiving soon after marriage is highly glorified in Afghan society. Women continuously quit their jobs or drop out of schools because of the societal pressure to prove they are able to have babies soon after marriage"(para 7)
Aug. 14, 2017, 1:41 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Afghani was born in Kabul in 1974, a few years before the Soviet invasion of the country. When she was only a few months old, she contracted polio, which left one of her legs disabled. But for Afghani the disability became a blessing in disguise. Her family was conservative and did not approve of education for girls. Her sisters played outside, but Afghani was not able to; she became easily bored and spent her days crying. Finally, at the suggestion of her doctor, her father enrolled her in first grade"(para 5)
Aug. 10, 2017, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Most girls have had no schooling" (22).
July 26, 2017, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: UVAW-PRACTICE-1, AFE-DATA-1

"Other reasons [for high rates of child marriage] are high levels of violence against women as well as low school attendance and therefore low education levels for girls" (para 4).
July 13, 2017, 7:13 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-3, AFE-LAW-1, AFE-DATA-1

According to Table 1, 76% of Peruvian young men are enrolled in secondary school and 77% of Peruivan young women are enrolled in secondary school (1)
July 3, 2017, 2:58 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"The Committee is...concerned at: The wide gender gap in higher education enrolment, particularly at universities and graduate schools, as well as in fields of studies that are traditionally male-dominated, such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics; The large proportion of women who pursue higher education without completing their four-year university studies, which places them at a disadvantage in the labour market" (10)
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

In Table 4.1 it shows that the percent of women with a bachelor’s degree or higher, aged 25 and older in 2013 was 29.7% (125)
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

Figure 4.3 shows educational attainment among women by race and ethnicity, aged 25 and older in 2013. For all women, 12.8% had less than a high school diploma, 27.3% had a high school diploma or the equivalent, 30.3% had some college education or associate’s degree, 29.7% had a Bachelor’s Degree or higher. For Asian/Pacific Islander women, 15.5% had less than a high school diploma, 16.5% had a high school diploma or the equivalent, 19.7% had some college education or associate’s degree, 48.4% had a Bachelor’s Degree or higher. For white women, 7.9% had less than a high school diploma, 28.4% had a high school diploma or the equivalent, 31.2% had ...more
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“Among the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the three jurisdictions with the highest shares of women with less than a high school diploma are California (18.0 percent), Texas (17.5 percent), and Mississippi (16.0 percent) (Appendix Table B4.4). Wyoming has the smallest share of women with less than a high school diploma at 5.8 percent, followed by Vermont (6.5 percent) and Montana (6.7 percent). Although Wyoming has proportionately few women at the low end of the education spectrum, it also has a smaller share of women with a bachelor’s degree or higher than in the nation overall (26.9 percent compared with 29.7 percent). In Wyoming, women are most likely ...more
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“While a substantial share of immigrant women hold bachelor’s degrees, three in ten (29.6 percent) have less than a high school diploma” (131)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“Millennial women aged 25–34 are considerably more likely than millennial men of the same age range to have a bachelor’s degree or higher (36.3 percent compared with 28.3 percent). This difference between millennial women’s and men’s education is much larger than the difference between women and men overall (29.7 percent of women and 29.5 percent of men overall have a bachelor’s degree or higher)” (128)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“In 1990, 23.3 percent of men aged 25 and older held at least a bachelor’s degree, while only 17.6 percent of women had such credentials…. In 2000, 26.1 percent of men and 22.8 percent of women aged 25 and older had completed a bachelor’s degree or higher…. In 2013, women not only outnumbered men among those receiving bachelor’s degrees, but the share of women who held these degrees also slightly surpassed the share of men who had obtained them: 29.7 percent of women and 29.5 percent of men aged 25 and older held a bachelor’s degree or higher” (132)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“only 19.6 percent of women aged 65 and older have a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared with 29.9 percent of their male counterparts. Approximately 23.2 percent of women aged 65–74 have at least a bachelor’s degree, compared with 15.3 percent of women aged 75 and older” (142)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“The share of women with a bachelor’s degree or higher increased 6.9 percentage points during this time period [2002-2013], from 22.8 to 29.7 percent” (123)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“Asian/Pacific Islander women are the most likely to hold a bachelor’s degree or higher (48.4 percent), followed by women who identify with another race or two or more races (32.6 percent) and white women (32.5 percent). Native American and Hispanic women are the least likely to hold at least a bachelor’s degree (15.5 percent and 15.3 percent, respectively). One in three Hispanic women (33.9 percent) has less than a high school diploma; the proportion of Hispanic women with this level of education is approximately twice as large as the proportion of Native American women, the group with the second largest share of women holding the lowest level of education. White ...more
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“Women who live with a same-sex partner are considerably more likely to hold a bachelor’s or advanced degree (43.7 percent) than married women in different-sex households (34.9 percent) and women who live with a different-sex partner (25.0 percent). Men who live with a same-sex partner are the most likely to hold at least a bachelor’s degree (48.5 percent)” (135)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“The District of Columbia has, by far, the largest percentage of women with a bachelor’s degree or higher. More than half (53.5 percent) of women aged 25 and older in the nation’s capital hold this level of education. Massachusetts is a distant second, with 40.3 percent of women holding at least a bachelor’s degree…In West Virginia, fewer than one in five (19.1 percent) women aged 25 and older hold a bachelor’s degree or higher, the lowest percentage in the nation” (132-133)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“In 2013, 12.8 percent of women aged 25 and older in the United States had not completed high school, and 27.3 percent had a high school diploma or the equivalent as their highest level of educational attainment” (133)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“More than one in four immigrant women in the United States (27.9 percent) holds a bachelor’s or advanced degree, compared with 30.0 percent of U.S.-born women. Among the ten largest sending countries for female immigrants—Mexico, the Philippines, China, India, Vietnam, Korea, El Salvador, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Canada—immigrant women from India (71.8 percent), the Philippines (51.4 percent), and Korea (46.1 percent) are the most likely to have a bachelor’s degree or higher” (131)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

“During the 2012–2013 academic year, women comprised 57 percent of the nation’s college students” (132)
May 1, 2017, 3:07 p.m.
Countries: Singapore
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-2, AFE-DATA-1

"Women enjoy the same legal rights as men, including civil liberties, employment, commercial activity, and education. In 2013 women made up 51.6 percent of university graduates and 42.5 percent of professionals, managers, executives, and technicians" (21).
April 4, 2017, 8:49 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Since 1990, when democracy was restored in Bangladesh, the country has done a tremendous job enrolling approximately 9 million girls in school, with nearly 3 million of those girls attending school in madrassas" (Para 1). "Although approximately 3 million girls in Bangladesh are enrolled in madrassa schools, the majority will not complete secondary school or transition to university, and only the smallest percentage will enter the labor market. According to data from the madrassa Education Board of Bangladesh and informal conversations with madrassa teachers, an increasing number of girls attending madrassa drop out each year before completing lower secondary (grade 10) schooling and for those who do go on to ...more
March 16, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Guinea
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"While girls and boys had equal access to all levels of primary and secondary education, approximately 56 percent of girls attended primary school, compared with 66 percent of boys. Government figures indicated 11 percent of girls obtained a secondary education, compared with 21 percent of boys; a 2011 study from the International Labor Organization (ILO) confirmed this disparity" (23).
March 8, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Germany
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Slightly more than half of university graduates in 2012 were women" (19).
March 7, 2017, 10:54 a.m.
Countries: Gambia
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"During the year an estimated 75 percent of primary school-age children enrolled in primary schools. Islamic schools (madrassahs) enrolled another 15 percent. Girls constituted approximately half of primary school students and one-third of high school students" (22).
Feb. 27, 2017, 5:43 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Women with disabilities were more disadvantaged than men in education and employment. The 2010 Population Council Young Adult Survey found young persons with disabilities were less likely to have ever attended school than those without disabilities. The survey indicated girls with disabilities were less likely than boys to be in school: 23 percent of girls with disabilities were in school, compared with 48 percent of girls and 55 percent of boys without disabilities. Overall, 48 percent of young persons with disabilities surveyed reported not going to school due to their disability" (32-33).
Feb. 10, 2017, 5:18 p.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"Whereas a few decades ago, the uni- versity realm was dominated by men, today nearly two-thirds of all university degrees in Sweden are awarded to women. Equal numbers of women and men now take part in postgraduate and doctoral studies" (1-2).
Feb. 2, 2017, 12:33 p.m.
Countries: D R Congo
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"A 2013 government study found that between the ages of five and 17, girls made up more than half of the out-of-school population, with 68.3 percent of girls attending school as compared with 74.5 percent of boys" (29).
Jan. 31, 2017, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Comoros
Variables: AFE-DATA-1

"An approximately equal number of girls and boys attended public schools, but fewer girls graduated" (11).