The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for AFE-PRACTICE-1

Dec. 14, 2018, 5:46 p.m.
Countries: Malawi
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"'I have terminated 330 marriages of which 175 were girl-wives and 155 were boy-fathers, I wanted them to go to school and that has worked,' she told Nyasa Times, 'I don’t want youthful marriages, they must go to school…no child should be found loitering at home or doing household chores during school time'" (para 3).
Dec. 14, 2018, 4:36 p.m.
Countries: Libya
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Colonel Qaddafi, in his bizarre style, had opened opportunities for women in ways that few other Arab strongmen ever did. 'It is an undisputed fact that both man and woman are human beings,' Colonel Qaddafi wrote in the Green Book, his magnum opus of philosophical musings. He expanded women’s education, sharply reduced illiteracy among women, enabled women to enter new professions, and conspicuously included uniformed women in both the army and the police" (3) Women illiteracy was a sharply reduced issue, once a large issue (A.M.G.-CODER COMMENT).
Dec. 6, 2018, 12:25 p.m.
Countries: Trinidad/Tobago
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The Marriage Act (1923), the Muslim Marriage and Divorce Act (1961), the Hindu Marriage Act (1945) and the Orisa Marriage Act (1999) allow for girls to be married at 12, 14 and 16 years of age, which causes them to drop out of school and exposes them to health risks, including maternal mortality owing to early pregnancy" (page 6). "The Committee . . . commends the State party on introducing an adolescent mothers programme in 1996, aimed at, among other things, supporting teenage mothers and assisting with re-entry into school after childbirth. The Committee is concerned, however, at: (a) The high rate of teenage pregnancy, resulting in girls dropping out...more
Dec. 1, 2018, 2:20 p.m.
Countries: Malawi
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"In many Malawian communities, gendered barriers to schooling for girls include domestic chores, sibling care, distance to schools, and lack of safety, transportation, and hygiene facilities. Expectations to marry, the risk of pregnancy, violence, lack of access to dignified menstrual hygiene, and barriers to a quality education are just some of the obstacles that limit girls' lives and prevent them from reaching their full potential" (para 6, 7).
Nov. 30, 2018, 1:43 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Although sexual harassment is prohibited by a 2009 High Court guideline, a June 2016 Bangladesh National Woman Lawyers’ Association (BNWLA) document noted that harassment remained a problem and monitoring and enforcement of the guidelines were poor, which sometimes prevented girls from attending school or work" (26). "The government offered subsidies to parents to keep girls in class through 10th grade... Despite free classes, teacher fees, books, and uniforms remained prohibitively costly for many families, and the government distributed hundreds of millions of free textbooks to increase access to education... Early and forced marriage was a factor in girls’ attrition from secondary school" (26). "Many forms of child abuse, including sexual...more
Nov. 26, 2018, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Human rights NGOs expressed concern that the law on compulsory education allows female students to be kept at home and married early . . . The Ministry of Family and Social Policies provided conditional cash transfers to support families and children. The ministry reported that these cash transfers helped poor families continue education for their daughters, although it did not indicate how many families received the stipend during the year" (page 59).
Nov. 16, 2018, 12:39 p.m.
Countries: Bhutan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Girls have unequal access to the country’s secondary and tertiary schools because of their distance, their lack of adequate sanitation, and transportation difficulties" (14).
Nov. 16, 2018, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"While all women in Burma face the same struggle to enjoy their rights under CEDAW, rural and ethnic women face additional hurdles and specific harms such as trafficking, unequal access to education and healthcare, land insecurity and the devastating impact of drug production and trade. Moreover, rural and ethnic women are directly implicated by armed conflict and the quest for peace. This gap between the experiences of women in cities and urban settings versus those of ethic women in rural areas must be understood and taken account when analyzing the status of women’s rights in Burma" (page 1). "Despite being in the 14th year of a Long Term Education Plan,...more
Nov. 16, 2018, 9:30 a.m.
Countries: Belgium
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Restrictions on Islamic clothing in... schools, and public spaces affected Muslim women in particular" (12).
Nov. 15, 2018, 12:07 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"While taking note of the programme PROMAJOVEN, which provides basic education grants to pregnant teenagers and young mothers, the Committee is concerned that pregnant teenage girls are stigmatized and forced to drop out from school" (8).
Nov. 9, 2018, 2:01 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Reports indicate that girls with less education are at the highest risk of child marriage" (para 9).
Nov. 9, 2018, 1:53 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Reports indicate that girls with less education are at the highest risk of child marriage" (para 9).
Nov. 9, 2018, 11:06 a.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The education system does not adequately address deep-rooted gender stereotypes… In particular, the Committee notes with concern the low number of girls assuming the class president role and the reported incidence of sexual harassment in schools" (9). "The Committee is concerned about the limited information on the situation of women and girls with disabilities in the State party and on the services available, in particular access to education" (12).
Nov. 3, 2018, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"According to media reports, on December 1, at a conference in Bnei Brak, leading rabbis in the Ashkenazi ultra-Orthodox community issued an order to the principals of ultra-Orthodox institutions not to recognize the degrees of women who study in academic institutions. They also banned ultra-Orthodox women from attending colleges and universities, saying a woman’s higher pay resulting from higher education was 'a danger to the entire structure of the household'" (para 159). "The government did not enforce compulsory education, however, in unrecognized Bedouin villages in the Negev, and Bedouin children, particularly girls, continued to have the highest illiteracy rate in the country" (para 165)
Nov. 2, 2018, 9:21 a.m.
Countries: Kazakhstan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"According to observers, women in rural areas faced greater discrimination than women in urban areas and suffered from . . . education and employment opportunities, limited access to information" (page 29). "Access to education, however, was a challenge for some migrant children who do not have an individual identification number, which became a requirement for school enrollment in September 2014" (page 30). "Incidents of child abuse in state-run institutions, such as . . . boarding schools . . . were “not rare,” according to government sources" (page 31).
Nov. 1, 2018, 6:27 p.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Afterward, victims [of rape] reported being thrown out of universities" (para 3).
Oct. 31, 2018, 1:23 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-2, ASR-PRACTICE-1

"For more than a decade, investigators found, the school (Tokyo Medical University) had systematically altered entrance-exam scores to restrict the number of female students and to award admission to less-qualified male applicants. The supposed rationale, that female doctors are prone to leave the profession after marriage or childbirth, only inflamed a national debate on gender inequality" (para. 1).
Oct. 28, 2018, 9 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Universities are also enforcing the beard and hijab ban, and one university has also banned women from wearing a Tajik traditional shawl. Police in Dushanbe are also enforcing the ban with visits to schools" (para 7). "Tajik State Pedagogical University in Dushanbe announced on 30 September that female students cannot attend lectures wearing a traditional Tajik shawl covering the head. Statements announcing this from Mirzabek Sharipov, Dean of the Biology Faculty, were widely reported by Tajik news agencies such as akhbor.com" (para 28). "Sharipov also insisted that women can attend universities in a hijab, claiming 'absolutely they can.' However, Akobir Karimov, Dean of the Biology Faculty of Tajikistan National University...more
Oct. 28, 2018, 7:56 p.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Some young girls are given away to older men whom they call 'sugar daddies'. They drop out of school when pregnant but school is already difficult when they are hassled on the way there and when they are menstruating. Without school, options are limited and the cycle of poverty continues. Maternal malnutrition, complications surrounding birth and abortion are all present" (para 11).
Oct. 27, 2018, 7:47 p.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"In Nampula, the province where Miss Nelmane lives, 60 per cent of teenage girls will get pregnant before they are 19, and a similar proportion will be married by that age. Most will drop out of school and preclude themselves from ever joining the formal workplace" (para 13). "'Some of my classmates are already married, or have boyfriends,' she said. 'They drop out of school when they get pregnant, and sometimes they miss two years'" (para 26).
Oct. 26, 2018, 8:42 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Women and girls also experienced discrimination in education since those who become pregnant or married young were often pressured to leave school" (page 16). "The law provides for tuition-free, compulsory education for children between ages six and 16, although many children did not attend school due to lack of resources or available facilities. Students often had to pay for their own books, uniforms, and other school supplies. Girls encountered greater difficulties in continuing in school beyond the elementary level. When families could not afford for all their children to attend school, parents tended to remove daughters rather than sons from school. Sexual harassment by school staff and early pregnancy also...more
Oct. 25, 2018, 3:09 p.m.
Countries: Sudan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Alkarib said that although child marriage is not new to Sudanese society, the phenomenon has been on the rise during the past two decades... She said, 'There are economic factors and widespread poverty. The closure of girls' boarding schools which persuaded some families to stop sending their daughters to school and marrying them off instead" (para 11).
Oct. 22, 2018, 9:31 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Women had access to primary and advanced education, although the percentage of female students entering universities decreased from 62 percent in 2007-08 to 48 percent in 2012-13, following 2012 gender-rationing policies" (para 160). "Although primary schooling until age 11 is free and compulsory for all, the media and other sources reported lower enrollment in rural areas, especially for girls" (para 165)
Oct. 19, 2018, 7:59 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Although the law provides for free education, most schools were not free, and poverty put education out of the reach of many children...Enrollment in primary and secondary education was virtually the same for both girls and boys, but according to NGOs, boys continued to be more likely to finish school, particularly in rural areas" (para 162)
Oct. 12, 2018, 11:14 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"'The ongoing conflict and worsening security situation across the country, combined with deeply ingrained poverty and discrimination against girls, have pushed the rate of out-of-school children up for the first time since 2002 levels,' UNICEF's Afghanistan country study said in a statement" (para 3). "The spread of violence had forced many schools to close, undermining fragile gains in education for girls in a country where millions have never set foot in a classroom" (para 4). "Adele Khodr, UNICEF's Afghanistan representative, said those out of school were at an 'increased danger of abuse, exploitation and recruitment [into armed gangs]'" (para 6). UNICEF's representative is referring to schools in the worst-affected provinces,...more
Oct. 11, 2018, 8:09 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"In districts where the Taliban have regained control or have enough power to intimidate residents, they have returned to barring girls from the classroom and dictating curriculum for the boys" (para 13). "The HRW report said that girls “often bear the brunt of these disruptions because parents are wary of sending daughters to schools occupied by armed men'" (para 18).
Oct. 8, 2018, 3:27 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"From the time she was young, she was the clever one in her family. She attended a public university and studied Arabic literature, married at 19, raised five children and taught at a girls’ school" (para 22). "Only a limited number of training courses have opened for women — and given the strict gender segregation in effect in schools and government agencies, it is challenging to staff them. Earlier this year, pilot driver’s education programs were scrambling to find qualified women to instruct their Saudi sisters. That is how Sheikha al-Kadeeb, 29, who had been looking for work in finance, was recruited to teach driving" (para 31-32). "Another problem is...more
Oct. 5, 2018, 5:56 p.m.
Countries: Ukraine
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee is further concerned that schools offer 'life skills lessons' where girls are taught cooking and sewing, while boys are taught woodworking and carpentry, a situation that also upholds traditional gender roles in society. It is concerned about the unequal access of women to the universities of the Ministry of the Interior and Defence. The Committee is also concerned at the high dropout rates among Roma girls" (Pg 12).
Oct. 3, 2018, 1:31 p.m.
Countries: Honduras
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"By law education is free, compulsory, and universal through middle school, corresponding to between 15-17 years of age, although students at the higher levels often had to pay fees" (para 112). These fees may be a barrier to girls' education. Some families may choose to send sons rather than daughters to school in order to save money (MAD - CODER COMMENT). "Children ages eight to 12 frequently worked as lookouts and collected “war taxes” (extortion payments); consequently, areas around schools were frequently battlegrounds for rival gangs" (para 115)
Sept. 26, 2018, 10:49 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Our report shows that close relationships exist between child marriage, teen pregnancy, and the low level of education reached by large numbers of girls. It shows that child marriage is likely to be the cause of more than half of babies born to under 18s in Uganda, so that ending it could reduce early childbearing by the same amount" (para 9). "The report’s analysis suggests that, depending how early a girl marries, child marriage reduces the likelihood of completing secondary school by 12 to 23 percentage points. Once a girl is married, it is very difficult for her to stay at school, whatever her age. In contrast, keeping girls in...more