The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for AFE-PRACTICE-3

April 17, 2018, 4:59 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"The percentage of the population with no education has been decreasing over time, from 46 % of females and 34% of males in 1991-92 TDHS to 24% of females and 19% of males in 2015-16 TDHS. . . . Urban residents are more likely to complete secondary school than rural residents. For example, 15% of females in urban areas have completed secondary school compared with 4% of females in rural areas. Similarly, 18% of males in urban areas have completed secondary school compared with 4% of males in rural areas. Similar patterns are observed for education beyond secondary school. Mainland and Zanzibar residents are similar in the percentages that have ...more
March 20, 2018, 1:29 p.m.
Countries: Gambia
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"The Committee commends the State party for achieving gender parity in enrolment in primary education and for setting up a trust fund for girls’ education, but remains concerned about: (a) The lower completion rate of girls at the primary level compared with that of boys, their considerably lower enrolment and retention rates at the secondary and tertiary levels and in vocational education, and the insufficient use of temporary special measures in this regard" (page 8).
March 19, 2018, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Iran’s view, found in its constitution, that because women have smaller brains than men, they are intellectually inferior to men and not able to benefit from education is laughable, given their own statistics. Women and girls were greatly benefited by the government’s literacy campaign, and by 2009, made up more than half of the students in Iranian colleges and universities. This happened in spite of the fact that women are prevented from entering certain fields of study not deemed appropriate to their gender. The educational successes of young Iranian women are all the more notable, given that discrimination against these highly qualified and educated young women means that they do ...more
Feb. 27, 2018, 11:14 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"It should be noted, however, that people’s attitudes and behaviours toward school, especially in the countryside, are not always favourable. Access and retention of girls remains a problem, one that arises mainly from sociocultural and economic obstacles such as early marriage and poverty. One of the objectives of the Ten-Year Education Development Programme (PDDE) requires strong mobilization and real involvement of all stakeholders through appropriate educational strategies and formulas" (pg 13). "Accordingly, the Ministry of National Education, through the Directorate for the Promotion of Girls’ School Enrolment and with the support of its partners, has developed strategies for behavioural change to achieve greater social mobilization in favour of education in ...more
Jan. 10, 2018, 4:16 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Karima, who like many Afghans goes by one name, secretly attended sixth grade in Paktia's capital, Gardez, but her family forced her to stop. 'When my brothers learned about it, they burned my books,' she said. 'Now me and my two sisters are at home, not allowed to go to school'" (para 16-17).
Jan. 10, 2018, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Just 5% of the province's 50,000 school-aged girls make it to sixth grade" (para 15). This data refers to the province of Paktia (CODER COMMENT-BCT).
Dec. 14, 2017, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

At 9:31 of the video Razia's teacher says "Razia was my student from class 1. She picked up everything I taught her right away. The girls are good students , but their parents can’t leave them behind on their own. After class 5 or 6, when the girls can’t study anymore, the marriage proposals start and then they marry. Parents think, if they marry their daughter off, they won’t have the financial burden of looking after her" (ENB-Coder Comment)
Dec. 7, 2017, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3, AFE-DATA-1

"Ms. Nehad AbolKomsan, ECWR [Egyptian Center for Women's Rights] Chairwoman, believes that these statements [MPs calling for mandatory virginity testing for university and vocational school students] are incitement to violence against large segments of young women, as the number of young women enrolled in the Egyptian universities reaches 1688770, amounting to 50.14% and the number of girls enrolled in vocational schools reaches 709370, amounting to 44.5%.According to the international conventions and United Nations’ decisions ratified by Egypt; This [MPs calling for mandatory virginity testing for female university and vocational school students] is a gross violation of human rights and incitement to violence against a large segment of population up to ...more
Nov. 7, 2017, 4:20 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-2, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"[Iman] Assaf blamed the spread of unemployment among women on the Israeli occupation, which erects checkpoints between cities in the West Bank, thus undermining Palestinians’ movements, the marginalization of Palestinian women, their isolation in some remote areas and discrimination between the two genders in employment. In addition, the quality of university education women receive is sometimes not in line with the job market requirements"(para 7)
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-2, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"But Nidhi Gupta from the Takshashila Institute, a thinktank, said the law was a step in the right direction despite its limitations.She said: 'Women bring as much skill and talent to the table as men do. We go to the best schools, best colleges, as we are as talented and skilled as men are. So why should we be excluded'"(para 20-21)
Oct. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Saleh justifies the stress that the Nubian culture lays on Nubian women marrying Nubian men, saying, 'Part of the Nubian heritage is collapsing, with the demise of the language, and so the society is attempting to preserve its existence through its customs and traditions.' She noted that 'Nubian men think it’s preferable for a Nubian woman to marry the son of a [Nubian] security guard rather than the son of a non-Nubian minister, [even if it means] a Nubian woman with a Ph.D. might end up marrying a Nubian man who hasn't even graduated middle school'"(para 10)."She [Wahibah Saleh] believes that the internet has succeeded in changing Nubians in a ...more
Oct. 4, 2017, 7:02 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Like many women, I always thought that after university and finding some financial stability, I would marry and have children.I guess the fact that I grew up in a progressive and supportive family made me forget that the experiences of Afghan women are unlike those of many women around the world. I forgot, for a second, that as a woman unless you can have children, your education, career, and marriage are considered meaningless"(para 2)."Conceiving soon after marriage is highly glorified in Afghan society. Women continuously quit their jobs or drop out of schools because of the societal pressure to prove they are able to have babies soon after marriage"(para 7)."But ...more
Sept. 22, 2017, 4:25 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Omaima Hoshan [living in a refugee camp in Jordan since 2012 but originally from Syria], 14, wasn’t really aware of early marriage until her best friend dropped out of school in the fifth grade. Omaima was very concerned. Her friend was an excellent student — the best in their class — and had always dreamed about becoming a doctor, so why would she leave school? Omaima learned from the teacher that her friend had married her 18-year-old cousin under pressure from her father. The girl hadn’t even turned 13 yet. Omaima never saw her again.From that day, Omaima noticed more girls leaving school as young as 12, 13 or 14 ...more
Sept. 22, 2017, 4:24 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-2, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Omaima Hoshan [living in a refugee camp in Jordan since 2012 but originally from Syria], 14, wasn’t really aware of early marriage until her best friend dropped out of school in the fifth grade. Omaima was very concerned. Her friend was an excellent student — the best in their class — and had always dreamed about becoming a doctor, so why would she leave school? Omaima learned from the teacher that her friend had married her 18-year-old cousin under pressure from her father. The girl hadn’t even turned 13 yet. Omaima never saw her again.From that day, Omaima noticed more girls leaving school as young as 12, 13 or 14 ...more
Aug. 28, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-2, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"The ratio of men and women in the labor force in the Solomon Islands has remained relatively stagnant over the past decade, largely a product of gender inequalities in education, training, household responsibilities, and cultural attitudes about the role of women"(para 3)
Aug. 15, 2017, 7:56 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Kanunga had to confront other leaders who didn’t share his perspective. 'It was very hard for me to speak about it, even after being taught the effects of the female genital mutilation,' he says. 'When I stood up to oppose female genital mutilation, people were shocked. They questioned why the defender of our culture was going against our tradition. But I believe the girl-child should be given a voice, a right to education and a right to life. Girls are a very important element of our society. If we educate them, they can change the community'"(para 8)."In the Maasai community, as soon as a girl undergoes circumcision, she is considered ...more
Aug. 14, 2017, 1:42 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"'Everything was always a discrimination in our family,' says [Jamila] Afghani, who observed how her brothers behaved with their wives. 'They were educated women, but my brothers stopped them from continuing their education and working,' she recounts. 'I thought, if [my brothers] can go outside, why not my sisters-in-law'"(para 9). Jamila and her family moved from Afghanistan to Pakistan when she was in fifth grade (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 14, 2017, 1:41 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"But in one neighborhood in the city, an imam has kept the doors of his mosque open to women for 12 years now. He often preaches about women’s rights in Islam – that women are equal to men and have the right to work and study"(para 1)."The sermons delivered by imams about the importance of education have also helped many women persuade their families to let them study. In fact, some 6,000 imams in Afghanistan have participated in Afghani’s training program"(para 4)."'Everything was always a discrimination in our family,' says [Jamila] Afghani, who observed how her brothers behaved with their wives. 'They were educated women, but my brothers stopped them ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:55 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-2, IAD-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-2, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Son you should focus on your studies instead of wasting your time playing on your phone at all times. You need to study hard! After all, you will be the one who shall take care of us when we are old and eventually inherit our property". The father tells his son this at 0:01. He also has a daughter (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 9, 2017, 5:34 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"'My youth was not a time period where I could have achieved something. My parents are to be blamed. They used to think I’m a "girl". “Why educate girls?” I regret the things I didn’t get to do. If I had been educated, I Too would have gone out and achieved something. I would have worked for my children. That’s why I think my daughter should never be in this hopeless situation. But this is how I see it. What I couldn’t do, my daughters should be able to. They should be successful in whatever they choose'". This statement was made by the mother at 0:09 (ENB-Coder Comment)."Whatever my daughter ...more
July 13, 2017, 7:13 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-3, AFE-LAW-1, AFE-DATA-1

According to Table 1, 76% of Peruvian young men are enrolled in secondary school and 77% of Peruivan young women are enrolled in secondary school (1)
April 4, 2017, 8:49 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Although approximately 3 million girls in Bangladesh are enrolled in madrassa schools, the majority will not complete secondary school or transition to university, and only the smallest percentage will enter the labor market...So, even though madrassa education may be free of cost in many cases—a traditional barrier many girls face in enrolling in private school barriers related to the quality of girls’ education discourages their retention and completion in madrassas" (Para 4). "One issue is that madrassa education often puts girls’ education as secondary to that of boys. For example, the majority of madrassas around the country use a cloth curtain to divide the boys from the girls in the ...more
March 14, 2017, 3:23 p.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"While compulsory through age 14, education through the secondary level is not obligatory, and girls were significantly less likely than boys to be educated to the secondary school level" (17).
Feb. 23, 2017, 9:45 a.m.
Countries: Equatorial Guinea
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Boys generally completed an additional seven years of secondary school or attended a program of vocational study after primary education. Domestic work and childbearing limited secondary education attendance for many girls in rural areas" (24).
Feb. 15, 2017, 2:46 p.m.
Countries: Djibouti
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"Although the educational system did not discriminate against girls, societal attitudes resulted in lower school enrollment rates for girls in some regions" (21).
Jan. 31, 2017, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Comoros
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"When families paid private-school tuition, boys generally were more likely to attend schools than girls. An approximately equal number of girls and boys attended public schools, but fewer girls graduated" (11).
Jan. 30, 2017, 4:13 p.m.
Countries: Chad
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3, AFE-DATA-1

"According to the most recent World Bank Development Indicators database, six girls attended primary school for every 10 boys. Most children did not attend secondary school" (19).
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:08 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"But, their continuation with education is breaking down due to various socio-economic and cultural reasons. Socio-cultural attitudes in the form of growing fundamentalism, increasing incidence of sexual violence and harassment against girls are also identified as contributing factors behind girl’s dropout of the school system. Gender disparity is significantly high in higher education (university level). In 2001, among the total student at public universities, only 24.3 percent were female students whereas, male enrollment comprises almost 3 times higher (75.7 percent) than that of the female. It is also observed that, over the years, both male and female enrollment at university level is increasing with a slower rate" (11). "Traditionally, women ...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"But the marriage slump — caused in large part by China’s aging population and the legacy of its harsh one-child policy — has a silver lining. It also stems from the rise of an educated population of women. Specialists in economics, demography and sociology say some of those women are delaying marriage to build careers and establish financial footing, resulting in a more empowered female population that no longer views marriage as the only route to security" (para 5). This trend indicates improving attitudes toward women's education (KH- CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:18 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: AFE-PRACTICE-3

"According to the 2006 and 2011 I-MICS, the proportion of women with less than secondary education is around 55 percent, with little variation across age groups" (10). This trend likely indicates gender biased societal attitudes regarding the importance of a woman's education (KH-CODER COMMENT).