The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

Nov. 10, 2017, 4:57 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"In the absence of redistribution of existing gender roles, gains for women that should result from investments in physical infrastructure, for example, may be short-lived, or benefit them less than men. After one village in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) was electrified, it was found that the main effect was to lead women to shift their domestic responsibilities to the evening, resulting in them working longer hours in the field. Leisure time increased for the village as a whole, but men were the primary beneficiaries (FAO, IFAD, and ILO 2010, p. 40, referring to Lucas et al. 2003)"(4)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:57 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010)"(3)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:57 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)."If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea"(3)."A major cause of the persistence of existing gender roles is that many men in the formal sector work long hours, providing at least a partial explanation of why they are not assuming a greater share of family responsibilities. ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:57 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia, Pakistan
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"A major cause of the persistence of existing gender roles is that many men in the formal sector work long hours, providing at least a partial explanation of why they are not assuming a greater share of family responsibilities. In countries such as Indonesia, Republic of Korea, and Pakistan, more than 30% of all employees work more than 48 hours per week. Male employees especially tend to work excessive hours—both a consequence and cause of gender stereotypes reinforcing the existing division of labor (Lee, McCann, and Messenger 2007, p. 240)"(6)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:57 p.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:57 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"A study on the Indian state of Gujarat estimated that reducing to 1 hour a day the time spent fetching water by women would allow the women to increase their incomes by $100 yearly using the time saved (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP] 2006)"(3)."It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were ...more
Nov. 7, 2017, 11 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"The workday begins at half past three in the morning, when they start sweeping the streets with handmade brooms. Later in the day, women in orange hi-vis vests can be seen digging the earth, planting shrubs and tending roadside flowers...Street cleaners are now mostly female, although there are a few men who join their ranks, either very young or elderly. The salary is small, but it makes a difference to the family budget"(para 3,5)
Nov. 3, 2017, 10:47 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"A national survey of women aged 18 to 65 by the Moroccan High Commission for Planning found that in 2009 nearly two-thirds – 62.8 percent – had experienced physical, psychological, sexual, or economic violence"(1)."She [Shayma] said that two months into their marriage, he started having an affair, then started to beat her. She said he would punch her, throw her from the bed, and one time kicked her in her belly when she was pregnant. She said he raped her many times, and demanded money from her"(9)
Oct. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"She [Asma Mahmoud] stressed that 'there is a sharp distinction between men and women; it's incumbent on Nubian women to be at their fathers’, brothers’ or husbands’ beck and call all the time'"(para 5)."Fatima Imam, a translator, researcher and human rights activist on Egyptian women's issues, noted in remarks to Al-Monitor that Nubian women have suffered a decline in stature within Nubian society. Women once held authority and managed the Nubian economy to such an extent that men would be referred to by their mothers' names. But Imam has been saddened by the return of a chauvinist culture once again to Nubia, one of the consequences of the siege on ...more
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"When their husbands die many widows are left destitute. If they remain with their in-laws they may be confined to the house and treated like servants, activists say"(para 15)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"Women carried a special burden on their shoulders during the republic’s two wars. Men fought on both sides, and for those who didn’t, it was dangerous to move through the republic’s numerous checkpoints. They could be arrested, abducted, tortured or killed. Women became the main breadwinners, took care of children, cleared away debris and repaired damaged houses. They negotiated with the military, and when men were abducted by security services they blocked roads, protested, spent days in official institutions trying to establish their whereabouts, and searched through mass graves"(para 12)."Chechnya’s 38-year-old dictator Ramzan Kadyrov declared that his regime was going to restore traditional values and mores, and today exerts immense ...more
Sept. 26, 2017, 2 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"The first episode addressed the importance of time management and prioritization in particular in house management. It also stressed the importance of the participatory approach in life and family management through the division of home responsibilities among all the family members for making a successful family life based on participation. To listen the first episode, please visit https://soundcloud.com/user-160861507/y5rcws60lylw - Kindly note, the episodes are in Arabic"(para 4)
Sept. 21, 2017, 6:25 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"According to the 2016 Chinese Women's Wealth Management Report, 80 percent of the decisions about the family's consumption were made by women. Hence, women's determination has a direct influence on the quantity and quality of the family consumption. In terms of the sum of consumption, women have more savings than men, the report indicated. Meanwhile, these figures will be continuously enhanced with women's age"(para 4-5)
Sept. 19, 2017, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Venezuela
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"The 31-year-old opted to be sterilized in November, as soon as she gave birth to her second daughter. 'It’s so difficult to find contraceptive methods and the [baby’s] basic needs are hard to fill,' she explained.In a country where government-subsidized products are the most affordable but the least available, mothers often spend whole days searching for milk powder or diapers. Those who can’t find them are simply forced to go without or turn to the black market, where these products are often readily available at inflated prices"(para 6-7)
Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: AOM-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2, MABFC-DATA-1

"The team captain, Forozan Tajali, 22, took over the training session. She said security concerns, family pressure and public harassment were not the only difficulties the soccer players faced. The national team has lost more members to marriage than anything else, she said, because Afghan women are considered too old to wed after their early 20s, and their husbands typically refuse to allow them to play"(para 29)
Sept. 1, 2017, 1:17 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

“Most Moroccan women are illiterate, and don’t have financial resources. They depend on their husband so they tend to obey this culture that tells them not to ask for anything, whether it is schools, hospitals or roads. They are told if they are you are calm and placid they will go to paradise" (para 26).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

“In Cairo, this same sense of exclusion from their own families was similarly felt. Girls here sometimes reported their inability to confide in family members when facing problems, in particular sexual harassment. Their reasons were fear of people blaming them, fear of being prevented from leaving home, fear of fights, and fear of damaging their family’s reputation. Sometimes, though, they were often afraid not of their families, but for their families – they were afraid their fathers and brothers would try to fight the harasser and end up getting hurt” (28). “In all of the cities, girls said that they did not feel included in decision-making processes at home or ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:33 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"In Delhi, ‘girls shared that inclusion within the school, community, and governing systems are a distant reality for them when they don’t feel included within their own families. The majority of them felt that their brothers were prioritised before them’" (28). “In all of the cities, girls said that they did not feel included in decision-making processes at home or in the community at large” (28). “In Delhi, it was found that girls differed from adult women in their responses about restrictions experienced both within the home and outside as well as how these impacted their mobility. Specifically, some girls spoke about discrimination within the home, as boys were given ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:31 a.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

“In all of the cities, girls said that they did not feel included in decision-making processes at home or in the community at large” (28). “Research shows that over 41% of girls in Lima never or seldom participate in decisions that affect them" (29).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

“In all of the cities, girls said that they did not feel included in decision-making processes at home or in the community at large” (28). “Girls in Kampala mentioned not having a voice in the decisions that affect them, citing examples of parents who decided to take them out of school. Young women who were married went on to explain that this attitude towards them continues in their marriage where they felt they had to obey the decisions taken by their husbands without question” (28). “In Kampala, adolescent girls in the district of Kasubi were not a part of any decision making process in their families or their communities. ‘They ...more
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:28 a.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

“In all of the cities [including Hanoi], girls said that they did not feel included in decision-making processes at home or in the community at large” (28).
Aug. 30, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"when he wants sex, I have to give it to him. I tell him I don’t like it, then he says, ‘if you stay in my house, you have to give it to me’. He grabs me all of a sudden when I am sleeping. Then, he attacks me" (1). This is a quote from a child bride at 9:54 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT). "This is the man Beezly is marrying. 25 year old Shyamal picked 13 year old Beezly because he says she’s easy to control. Shyamal tells me he was offered a lot more dowry money to marry other girls. But he wanted the youngest and most innocent ...more
Aug. 26, 2017, 11:31 a.m.
Countries: Rwanda
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

“To be a rural woman in Rwanda means you don’t easily know your land rights. It means you are dominated by your husband. It means you alone have the burden and struggle to feed your children. It also means that you face poverty because you don’t have your land rights” (1). Rose says this from 0:55-1:16 (MM - CODER COMMENT). “I used the land as I pleased, without the consent of my wife. Before I recognized my wife’s rights to land, I placed my daughters in the same low level as my wife, because for me, my sons had the right to land, and not my daughters” (1). Jean de ...more
Aug. 15, 2017, 7:56 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"In the Maasai community, as soon as a girl undergoes circumcision, she is considered a woman and, typically, no longer has to listen to her parents. She is now ready for marriage, no matter her age. As she is now a woman, she is also expected to leave school, which leads to fewer opportunities for girls and creates major barriers to gender equity"(para 9)."[Clare] Ntasikoi was among the first girls in the Maasai community to reject circumcision; she asked her father to allow her to finish school rather than undergo the cut and marry. At first, her father worried it would bring shame to his family"(para 18)
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:04 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"And the 2013 gender relations study also reported that only 3.7 per cent of Georgians, both male and female, fully disagreed with the statements, 'men have the last say in the family' and 'women should endure verbal abuse to maintain the integrity of the family'"(para 7)
July 19, 2017, 12:14 p.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"But traditional practices emphasising, among other things, girls' subordination to their husband, still contribute to child marriage" (para 10).
July 13, 2017, 5:58 p.m.
Countries: Bolivia
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

``Thus, the Court (Inter-American Court of Human Rights) recognized that the freedom and autonomy of women in sexual and reproductive health, generally, has historically been limited or annulled on the basis of negative and harmful gender stereotypes in which women have been socially and culturally viewed as having a predominantly reproductive function, and men viewed as decision-makers over women’s bodies. The Court recognized that non-consensual sterilization reflects this historically unequal relationship. The Court noted how the process of informed decision-making operated under the harmful stereotype that I.V., as a woman, was unable to make such decisions responsibly, leading to 'an unjustified paternalistic medical intervention' restricting her autonomy and freedom``(para 4).¨ ...more
June 16, 2017, 6:26 a.m.
Countries: Estonia
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

A graph on page 25 depicting responsibility for day-to-day money management decisions in the household indicates that for over 65% of Estonian households, both spouses are equally responsible for making money management decisions, while in approximately 15%, women are primarily responsible and in about 10% of households men are primarily responsible (TPJ – CODER COMMENT).
June 13, 2017, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Czech Republic
Variables: ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

A graph on page 25 depicting responsibility for day-to-day money management decisions in the household indicates that for almost 30% of Czech households, women are primarily responsible for money management decisions while in about 20% of households men are primarily responsible, and in almost 50% of households, both spouses are equally responsible for making money management decisions (TPJ – CODER COMMENT).
June 12, 2017, 1:04 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2, DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Nearly 10,000 people, aged between 18 and 59, were questioned with a majority of the men supporting a range of traditional and inequitable attitudes toward women, including a belief that they are not fit to be leaders, should not work outside the home, and that it is more important to educate boys than girls...In Egypt, more than 90% of men agreed with the statement that ‘a man should have the final word about decision in the home’. Although a majority – 58.5% – of women also agreed. More than half of the Egyptian men surveyed agreed that ‘there are times when a woman deserves to be beaten’, compared with less ...more