The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for BR-DATA-1

Sept. 8, 2017, 9:20 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"India’s total fertility rate of 2.3 is expected to sink below 2 within the next decade. Telangana’s fertility rate reached replacement levels before the State came into being in 2014...The third round of National Family Health Survey (NFHS) done a decade ago established that undivided Andhra Pradesh had recorded fertility rate of 1.8. The latest survey in 2015 affirmed Telangana’s fertility rate stood at 1.8 births per woman" (para 7-8).
Aug. 24, 2017, 2:39 p.m.
Countries: Portugal
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Birthrates in the region [Southern Europe] have slid back almost to where they were before the crisis emerged in 2008. ... In ... Portugal ... birthrates have reverted to about 1.3" (para 7).
Aug. 24, 2017, 2:38 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Birthrates in the region [Southern Europe] have slid back almost to where they were before the crisis emerged in 2008. ... In Italy, ... birthrates have reverted to about 1.3" (para 7).
Aug. 24, 2017, 2:37 p.m.
Countries: Spain
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Birthrates in the region [Southern Europe] have slid back almost to where they were before the crisis emerged in 2008. Women in Spain had been averaging 1.47 children per household, up from 1.24 in 2000. But those gains have all but evaporated" (para 7).
Aug. 24, 2017, 2:32 p.m.
Countries: Greece
Variables: BR-DATA-1

“In … Greece, birthrates have reverted to about 1.3 [since the economic crisis in 2008]” (para 7).
Aug. 23, 2017, 12:46 a.m.
Countries: Cuba
Variables: BR-DATA-1

The fertility rate was 1.6 percent (HDI: P3)
July 13, 2017, 7:13 p.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: BR-DATA-1

According to Table 1, the Peru fertility rate is 2.5. Units are not provided (1)
July 10, 2017, 9:14 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"In an analysis issued by the National Center for Health Statistics, researchers report that birthrates declined to record lows in all groups under age 30. Among women ages 20 to 24, the decline was 4 percent. For women 25 to 29, the rate fell 2 percent" (p 3)
July 10, 2017, 9:14 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CBMC-DATA-1, BR-DATA-1

"The birthrate among unmarried women went down, to 42.1 per 1,000 from 43.5 in 2015, a drop of 3 percent and the eighth consecutive year of decline since the peak of 51.8 in 2007 and 2008. There were differences by race: 28.4 percent of white babies had unmarried parents, 69.7 percent of black babies and 52.5 percent of Hispanics" (p 10-11)
July 10, 2017, 9:14 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"The present overall fertility rate puts the United States population below replacement level, but that does not mean the population is declining" (p 6)
July 10, 2017, 9:14 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CBMC-DATA-1, BR-DATA-1

"The decrease in the birthrate among teenagers — 9 percent from 2015 to 2016 — continues a long-term decline: 67 percent since 1991" (p 4)
July 10, 2017, 9:14 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"There were 62 births per 1,000 women aged 15 to 44, down 1 percent from 2015. There were 3,941,109 babies born in 2016" (p 2)
July 10, 2017, 9:14 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Women ages 40 to 44 also had more babies, up 4 percent from 2015. The rate for women 45 to 49 increased to 0.9 births per thousand from 0.8 in 2015" (p 9)
July 10, 2017, 9:14 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Fertility increased among older women. The birthrate for women ages 30 to 34 rose by 1 percent over the 2015 rate, and the rate for women ages 35 to 39 went up by 2 percent, the highest rate in that age group since 1962" (p 8)
May 31, 2017, 7:14 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Increased prevalence [of contraception] has been matched by the halving of fertility rates since 1990 – from an average of six children per woman to three" (p 8)
May 25, 2017, 12:32 p.m.
Countries: Germany, Japan, Russia, South Korea
Variables: BR-DATA-1

A graph titled “Figure 2. Populations of Russia, Japan, Germany and South Korea with Current Fertility Constant: 1950-2100” shows four separate lines, each charting the projected population given no changes to the current fertility rate. It shows that Russia would drop to less than 95 million in 2100 from the current (2015) 140 million, approximately. In Japan it is projected that the population will decrease to approximately 65 million from a current just above 125 million approximately. In Germany it shows the population will decline to 50 million from a current approximate 80 million. Then it shows South Korea will drop to a little more than 25 million from the ...more
May 25, 2017, 12:19 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Assuming a slight increase in its current fertility level, China’s population of 1.38 billion is projected – according to the UN medium variant – to peak by 2030 at 1.42 billion and then decline to 1 billion by the end of the century. However, if fertility were to remain constant at its current level, China’s population would soon begin declining, reaching around 0.8 billion by the year 2100. If fertility were to instantly reach the replacement level, an unlikely event, China’s population would grow to 1.51 billion by midcentury" (p 3) The document has a graph titled "Figure 1. Population of China by Fertility Level: 1950-2100" that visualizes this data ...more
March 22, 2017, 7:37 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"According to 2015 data, Chinese women had 1.05 children on average, well below the population replacement rate of more than 2.1" (para 27).
March 16, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Guinea
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"The adolescent birth rate was estimated at 154 per 1,000 girls and women ages 15 to 19 from 1999-2012" (22).
March 14, 2017, 11:44 a.m.
Countries: Armenia
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"'In 10 to 20 years, we will face a shortage of women and — combined with a dramatic decline in fertility rates — that will lead to a serious demographic crisis,' warned Garik Hayrapetyan, UNFPA Armenia’s assistant representative" (para 9).
Feb. 15, 2017, 2:34 p.m.
Countries: Dominican Republic
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"In 2014 the World Bank cited an adolescent birth rate of 1 percent..." (30).
Feb. 13, 2017, 3:53 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Poland’s birthrate is about 1.3 children per woman of reproductive age, compared with a rate of almost 1.9 in the U.S" (para 17).
Feb. 13, 2017, 3:51 p.m.
Countries: Poland
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Poland’s birthrate is about 1.3 children per woman of reproductive age" (para 17).
Feb. 2, 2017, 12:33 p.m.
Countries: D R Congo
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Adolescent birth rates were 138 per 1,000 live births for girls and women ages 15 to 19" (28).
Feb. 2, 2017, 7:39 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: BR-PRACTICE-2, BR-DATA-1

"It’s not that women aren’t choosing to pursue careers, sometimes at the expense of family, in ever increasing numbers. The low fertility rate in Japan is primary evidence of that" (para 12).
Jan. 30, 2017, 1:05 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"At the same time, fertility rates were declining to comparatively low levels, especially in China, with its introduction of the one-child policy. The high fertility levels of the 1950s, which were clearly dropping by the mid-1980s, have now reached near or below the replacement fertility level of approximately two births per woman" (para 6).
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:03 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"Much of the marriage decline results from China’s one-child policy. Ended formally in January after 35 years, the policy accelerated a decline in the country’s birthrate. As a consequence, people between 20 and 29 — prime marrying age — make up a declining share of the population compared with two decades ago" (para 9).
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:18 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"The conditions prevailing during the 2003–2011 Iraq War are likely to have altered previous fertility trends in multiple, and possibly countervailing, ways. On the one hand, the regime change marked a turning point in the country’s population policy. In the post-2003 period, family planning services have been actively supported by the government (United Nations 2011). The wider availability of birth control methods may have fostered a decline in the average number of children per woman" (2-3). "Figure 1b shows the estimated trend in the TFR using pooled data from the 2006 and 2011 I-MICS. Pooled fertility rates are obtained by summing the number of births from the two surveys in ...more
Jan. 18, 2017, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"UNFPA reported the adolescent birth rate as 128 per 1,000 girls and women ages 15 to 19 between 1999 and 2012" (32).
Dec. 2, 2016, 5:11 p.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: BR-DATA-1

"The data for the 2004–2012 period show that the fertility rate in Slovenia increased to 1.58" (4)