The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CIWM-DATA-1

Dec. 26, 2017, 10:52 p.m.
Countries: Panama
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1, MMR-PRACTICE-1, MMR-DATA-1, IM-DATA-1, PPWA-DATA-1

"Access to health care was a significant problem in the indigenous comarcas as reflected in high rates of maternal and infant mortality and malnutrition"(24)
Nov. 30, 2017, 1:10 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

"In Pakistan, the provision of take-home rations to girls attending school for at least 20 days a month boosted overall enrollment by 135% from fiscal year 1999 to fiscal year 2004 (WFP 2012, p. 53)"(62)."Private initiatives have sometimes supported take-home rations programs. A cooperative based in the United States, Land O’Lakes, working with funding by the United States Department of Agriculture, launched such a program in March 2010 in the province of Jacobabad, Pakistan. Enrollment rates of girls there were very low at the start of the program, at 36%, and half the girls’ primary schools were reportedly closed due to lack of participation of teachers and pupils. A take-home...more
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1, SMES-DATA-1, SMES-DATA-2, CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"According to a recent assessment of the program, 22,756 female headed households benefited from free rice distribution (around 12,000 tons of rice was distributed during the food lean period of late Oct/early Nov 2008); 31,555 girls benefited from a school feeding program; 5,510 girls were awarded scholarships; 6,453 female-headed households had access to a food-for-work program; 127 female volunteer teachers for the early childhood learning centers had access to a monthly rice grant; and 47,150 women (including 8,937 female-headed households) earned an income through a cash-for-work program. Further, a total of 13,841 female headed households benefited from the distribution of quality seeds and subsidized sale of fertilizers"(56)more
Nov. 29, 2017, 4:11 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

"Indeed, while sub-Saharan African countries consistently rank lower than South Asian countries in Human Development Index (HDI) indicators, women- and child-specific nutrition indicators—such as infants born with low birth weights and the percentage of undernourished children below 5 years of age—are generally better in the sub-Saharan Africa region. Sri Lanka is the major exception to this pattern"(18). Low birth weight in children could be a manifestion that women do not gain enough weight during pregnancy, possibly due to lack of calories (ENB-Coder Comment)
Nov. 29, 2017, 1:54 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

"A survey of households in rural Java, Indonesia revealed significant nutritional effects in 1997–1998. Mothers were found to buffer children’s caloric intake, resulting in increased maternal wasting. Reductions in consumption of high-quality food increased the prevalence of anemia in both mothers and children. The effects of maternal undernutrition were particularly severe for babies conceived and weaned during the crisis (Block et al. 2004)"(14)."In both Thailand and Indonesia, food prices increased significantly in 1997–1999. In Thailand, no significant nutritional outcomes were detected except for a reported increase in the incidence of anaemia in pregnant women. Indonesia, however, evidenced increased prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies (especially vitamin A) in children and women of...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 1:44 p.m.
Countries: Laos
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-2, AFE-PRACTICE-1, AFE-DATA-1

"In the Lao People’s Democratic Republic—where girls’ enrollment can be very low, particularly in rural areas and within some ethnic groups—pupils receive a take-home family ration of canned fish, rice, and iodized salt as an incentive for parents to send them to school. Though both girls and boys benefit, the effect on girls’ attendance has been most significant because of girls’ lower enrollment rate. From 2002 to 2008, enrollment rates in primary schools benefiting from the program increased from 60% to 88% for boys and from 53% to 84% for girls (WFP 2012, p. 49)"(62)
Nov. 29, 2017, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

"In 2008, maternal undernutrition (where a mother has a body mass index of less than 18.5 kg per square meter) affected more than one-fifth of women in south central and southeastern Asia, and more than two-fifths of women in India and Bangladesh"(12)."Agarwal highlights work done in Andhra Pradesh in south India by the nongovernment organization (NGO) Deccan Development Society. Groups of 5–15 poor, low-caste women in a drought-prone region were able to lease or purchase land with the support of government schemes (Agarwal 2003). The women typically would not have been able to buy or cultivate land on an individual basis. Group farming allowed planting of a wide range of...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:09 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1

"In 2008, maternal undernutrition (where a mother has a body mass index of less than 18.5 kg per square meter) affected more than one-fifth of women in south central and southeastern Asia, and more than two-fifths of women in India and Bangladesh"(12). "Bangladesh’s Challenging the Frontiers of Poverty Reduction—Targeting the Ultra-poor, launched in 2002 by the NGO BRAC, is a prime example of such a program. During its first phase (2002–2006), 100,000 ultra-poor women and their households living in 15 of the most food insecure districts of the country’s 64 districts were supported. The second phase (2007–2011), expanded the program’s reach threefold"(59)
Nov. 28, 2017, 9:50 p.m.
Countries: Malawi
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

"In Malawi, the introduction of take-home rations of 12.5 kg of maize per month for girls and orphans attending at least 80% of school days led to a 37.7% rise of girls’ enrollment (WFP 2012, p. 52)"(62)
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:02 p.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1, MURDER-DATA-1, IIP-PRACTICE-1

"According to the Hidden Gulag IV report, since late 2008, Jongo-ri (Camp 12) in North Hamkyung Province was expanded to include a women’s annex. Camp 12’s women’s annex holds approximately 1,000 women, most of whom were imprisoned after being repatriated from China. The existence of this women’s annex was corroborated by satellite imagery and defector testimony. Defector testimony cited food rations below subsistence levels, forced labor, and high rates of death due to starvation at Camp 12"(3)
Aug. 8, 2017, 5:49 p.m.
Countries: Norway
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

According to Figure 3.5, the percentage of women (aged 40-44) with a BMI greater than 30, signifying obesity, decreased from about 11% in 1965 to about 7.5% in 1985. It then increased to about 14% in 2000-20002. The percentage of men with a BMI greater than 30, signifying obesity, increased from about 5% in 1965 to about 16% in 2000-2002 (ENB-Coder Comment)
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:08 p.m.
Countries: Lesotho
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“Forty-five percent of women age 15-49 are overweight or obese; 20% are obese. Twelve percent of men age 15-49 are overweight or obese; 7% are obese” (163). “Forty-five percent of women in Lesotho are overweight or obese. Four percent are thin, and 51% of women have a BMI in the normal range” (173). “The percentage of women who are thin (indicative of undernutrition) has declined in the last 5 years by 2 percentage points. In contrast, the proportion of women who are overweight or obese (indicative of overnutrition) has increased by 3 percentage points since 2009 (Figure 11.9)” (173). “Women most likely to be thin (BMI below 18.5) are those...more
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“Thirty-one percent of ever-married women age 15-19 are undernourished (BMI <18.5). However, women’s nutritional status has improved considerably in the last 10 years. The percentage of women undernourished (BMI<18.5) has declined from 34 to 19 percent between 2004 and 2014” (151). “On the other hand, overweight or obesity (BMI ≥25) among ever-married women age 15-49 has been increasing over the past decade from 9 percent in 2004 to 24 percent in 2014” (151). “Using a lower cutoff point, with BMI ≥23 as a measure of overweight or obesity among ever-married women age 15-49, the proportion has increased from 17 percent in 2004 to 39 percent in 2014” (151). “The mean...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 4:05 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“Eleven percent of women are undernourished (BMI <18.5), and 25 percent are overweight or obese (BMI ≥25.0)” (175). “Table 11.8 shows that the mean BMI among women age 15-49 is 23.0 kg/m2. Mean BMI generally increases with age” (195). “Urban women have a mean BMI of 23.9 kg/m2, while the mean among rural women is 22.3 kg/m2. There are only small differences among women living in the different zones, although women in the North West have the lowest mean BMI (21.9 kg/m2)” (195). “Mean BMI is lower among women with no education (21.9 kg/m2) than among those with a primary or higher education (23.3 kg/m2 and 25.4 kg/m2, respectively). Mean...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:55 p.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“More than half of women (56 percent) have a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range (BMI 18.5-24.9)” (xxiii). “In Namibia, overweight and obesity are more common than underweight. A total of 28 percent of women are overweight or obese (BMI ≥25.0), including 12 percent classified as obese (BMI ≥30.0). At the other extreme, 16 percent are considered thin (BMI <18.5), including 6 percent who are moderately or severely thin (BMI <17)” (xxiii). “Table 12.8 shows that the average BMI for women in Namibia is 23, which is within the normal BMI range of 18.5-24.9. Overall, 56 six percent of women are within this range” (162). “Sixteen percent of...more
Sept. 14, 2016, 3:44 p.m.
Countries: Ghana
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“Overall, 54 percent of Ghanaian women have a BMI in the normal range, 6 percent are thin, and 40 percent are overweight or obese. Five percent of women are classified as mildly thin, and 1 percent are moderately or severely thin” (173). “Overweight and obesity seem be of greater concern in Ghana compared with thinness. The mean BMI for women age 15-49 in Ghana is 24.8 kg/m2” (173). “The mean BMI generally increases with age, with the lowest value (21.3 kg/m2) being observed in the youngest women age 15-19 and the highest value (27.2 kg/m2) being observed for women age 40-45. The mean BMI is positively associated with women’s education...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:55 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“Eleven percent of women are undernourished (BMI <18.5), and 25 percent are overweight or obese (BMI ≥25.0)” (175). “Table 11.8 shows that the mean BMI among women age 15-49 is 23.0 kg/m2. Mean BMI generally increases with age” (195). “Urban women have a mean BMI of 23.9 kg/m2, while the mean among rural women is 22.3 kg/m2. There are only small differences among women living in the different zones, although women in the North West have the lowest mean BMI (21.9 kg/m2)” (195). “Mean BMI is lower among women with no education (21.9 kg/m2) than among those with a primary or higher education (23.3 kg/m2 and 25.4 kg/m2, respectively). Mean...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:53 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“More than half of women (56 percent) have a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range (BMI 18.5-24.9)” (xxiii). “In Namibia, overweight and obesity are more common than underweight. A total of 28 percent of women are overweight or obese (BMI ≥25.0), including 12 percent classified as obese (BMI ≥30.0). At the other extreme, 16 percent are considered thin (BMI <18.5), including 6 percent who are moderately or severely thin (BMI <17)” (xxiii). “Table 12.8 shows that the average BMI for women in Namibia is 23, which is within the normal BMI range of 18.5-24.9. Overall, 56 six percent of women are within this range” (162). “Sixteen percent of...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:52 a.m.
Countries: Namibia
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“More than half of women (56 percent) have a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range (BMI 18.5-24.9)” (xxiii). “In Namibia, overweight and obesity are more common than underweight. A total of 28 percent of women are overweight or obese (BMI ≥25.0), including 12 percent classified as obese (BMI ≥30.0). At the other extreme, 16 percent are considered thin (BMI <18.5), including 6 percent who are moderately or severely thin (BMI <17)” (xxiii). “Table 12.8 shows that the average BMI for women in Namibia is 23, which is within the normal BMI range of 18.5-24.9. Overall, 56 six percent of women are within this range” (162). “Sixteen percent of...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:50 a.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“Nine percent of women age 15-49 are thin or undernourished (BMI <18.5 kg/m2); 33 percent of women are either overweight or obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m2), with 10 percent of them being obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2)” (xxiii). “Nine percent of women age 15-49 are thin or undernourished (BMI <18.5 kg/m2); 33 percent of women are either overweight or obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m2), with 10 percent being obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2)” (157). “The mean BMI among women age 15-49 is 23.7 kg/m2. Nine percent of women of reproductive age are thin or undernourished (BMI <18.5 kg/m2)” (179). “The proportions of mild thinness (17.0-18.4 kg/m2) and moderate and severe thinness (<17 kg/m2) are...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:47 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“Eleven percent of women are undernourished (BMI <18.5), and 25 percent are overweight or obese (BMI ≥25.0)” (175). “Table 11.8 shows that the mean BMI among women age 15-49 is 23.0 kg/m2. Mean BMI generally increases with age” (195). “Urban women have a mean BMI of 23.9 kg/m2, while the mean among rural women is 22.3 kg/m2. There are only small differences among women living in the different zones, although women in the North West have the lowest mean BMI (21.9 kg/m2)” (195). “Mean BMI is lower among women with no education (21.9 kg/m2) than among those with a primary or higher education (23.3 kg/m2 and 25.4 kg/m2, respectively). Mean...more
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:46 a.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“Overall, 46 percent of women and 72 percent of men have a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range. Comparatively few women are malnourished; only 3 percent of women are thin, and 1 percent are severely thin” (xxv). “Malnutrition is higher among men, with 10 percent of men assessed as too thin, and 3 percent considered moderately or severely thin. At the other end of the BMI range, 14 percent of men are assessed as overweight (BMI 25-29.9) and 4 percent are obese (BMI >30). Among women, 28 percent are classified as overweight, and 23 percent are considered obese” (xxv). “The BMI results indicate that only a few women...more
July 27, 2016, 10:06 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1

“Twenty-four percent of ever-married women age 15-49 are undernourished (BMI <18.5), and 17 percent are overweight or obese (BMI ≥25.0). Women’s nutritional status has improved only slightly over the years” (161). “Overall, 65 percent of ever-married women age 15-49 live in a food-secure environment. However, only 35 percent of women in the lowest wealth quintile are food secure compared with 90 percent of women in the highest wealth quintile” (161). “Twenty-one percent of ever-married women living in an environment of severe food insecurity are less than 145 centimeters tall, which is 7 percentage points higher than the national average of 13 percent” (185). “The mean BMI for ever-married women age...more
July 27, 2016, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: CIWM-PRACTICE-1, CIWM-DATA-1

“Nine percent of women are undernourished (BMI < 18.5), while 18 percent are overweight or obese (BMI > 25.0)” (143). “The mean BMI for women age 15-49 is 22.5; 9 percent of women are considered to be thin (BMI < 18.5), while 18 percent of women are considered overweight or obese (BMI > 25.0). Women age 15-19 are more likely to be thin (15 percent) than older women (8 percent or less). Rural women and women in the Northern and Eastern regions are also more likely to have a low BMI” (167). “The proportion of women with an overweight or obese BMI increases with age and wealth. For example, the...more
May 25, 2016, 10:55 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh, India
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1

"It was very high in some countries, such as Bangladesh, India and Timor-Leste, where over 40 per cent of children, both girls and boys, were found to be underweight...The exceptions to the pattern include Armenia, Bangladesh and India where girls were more underweight than boys by a margin of more than 3 per cent" (41).
May 25, 2016, 10:55 a.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1

According to Figure 2.8, approximately 25% of women were considered obese while less than 20% of men were considered obese from 2000-2008 (30).
May 25, 2016, 10:55 a.m.
Countries: Chile
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1

According to Figure 2.8, a little less than 30% of women were considered obese while just under 20% of men were considered obese from 2000-2008 (30).
May 25, 2016, 10:55 a.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1

According to Figure 2.8, less than 25% of women were considered obese while less than 20% of men were considered obese from 2000-2008 (30).
May 25, 2016, 10:55 a.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1

"The largest sex difference was seen in South Africa, where 27 per cent of women and 9 per cent of men were classified as obese" (30).
May 25, 2016, 10:55 a.m.
Countries: Mexico, Panama
Variables: CIWM-DATA-1

"In Panama and Mexico, 36 and 34 per cent of women respectively were considered obese, though there was also a significant percentage of men who were obese in both countries (28 per cent in Panama and 24 per cent in Mexico)" (30).