The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CL-DATA-1

April 11, 2018, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Burkina Faso
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Poverty is significantly higher among women (47.1 per cent) than men (45.7 per cent)" (10).
March 14, 2018, 6:54 p.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: CL-DATA-1, LO-LAW-1, LBHO-LAW-2

"The Committee notes with appreciation the introduction of temporary special measures to accelerate women’s political participation, but remains concerned that no other temporary special measures have been introduced as part of a necessary strategy to accelerate the achievement of substantive equality of women and men in all areas of the Convention in which women are underrepresented or disadvantaged, including with regard to access to land and higher education and to the increased feminization of poverty. The Committee encourages the State party to use temporary special measures, in accordance with article 4 (1) of the Convention and the Committee’s general recommendation No. 25 on the subject, as a necessary component of ...more
March 7, 2018, 9:50 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"In 2014, 28.5 million women were registered in situations of poverty, 78.4% of the population speaking an indigenous language. PROSPERA has a 25% that are indigenous women in its register and 95% of the transfers are to women in families in poor economic condition. 5158 community soup kitchens have been installed in 21 federal entities and 453 in municipalities of the National Crusade against Hunger (CNcH)" (page 33).
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:35 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"The broad areas of the SDGs are fighting poverty, inequality and injustice, and handling the fallout from climate change" (para 4).
Dec. 5, 2017, 10:38 a.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3, CL-DATA-1

"Women commonly face difficulties in reconciling responsibilities in the care economy—particularly the minding and educating of children of pre-school age—and employment on farms. In addition to modes of remuneration, the unavailability of public child-care services combined with poor transportation services may lead women to bring children with them to work on plantations. This has been documented in the horticultural sector in Punjab (Gill 2001), and in informal settlements established near plantations during the working season in South Africa (Barrientos, Dolan, and Tallontire 2003)"(47)
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:32 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: SMES-DATA-1, SMES-DATA-2, CL-DATA-1

"The program [The Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program] was designed, in part, to address poor women’s lack of income"(para 54)
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:02 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"The southwestern province of Yunnan in the People’s Republic of China is poor relative to the national average. Poor women members of ethnic minorities suffer most, with almost no income opportunities outside of agriculture. In 2009, a pilot project for community-based rural road maintenance by groups of ethnic minority women was launched in western Yunnan Province, with a $200,000 grant from the Asian Development Bank’s Gender and Development Cooperation Fund. The women’s groups numbered 21 and comprised 163 women. Some 55% of of the women were members of ethnic minorities, and 92% were from families living below the poverty line"(58)
Nov. 29, 2017, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Women may typically acquire assets through the market, but low earnings and little collateral most commonly limit this opportunity. Women are not remunerated for the work they do in their traditional roles, and their earnings are typically low when they do have some source of income. They also typically have less knowledge about land markets and legal registration requirements. The combination of these factors may explain why in the Indian state of Karnataka, for instance, only 16% of women land owners acquired land through purchase (Swaminathan, Suchitra, and Lahoti 2011, p. 39)"(27)."Women commonly face difficulties in reconciling responsibilities in the care economy—particularly the minding and educating of children of pre-school ...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:09 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Support for women’s economic empowerment has also included construction of rural markets with spaces reserved for women vendors, employment opportunities for destitute women in road construction and maintenance, and helping women farmers diversify into cash crops that yield higher incomes (Box 4)"(39)."Bangladesh’s Challenging the Frontiers of Poverty Reduction—Targeting the Ultra-poor, launched in 2002 by the NGO BRAC, is a prime example of such a program. During its first phase (2002–2006), 100,000 ultra-poor women and their households living in 15 of the most food insecure districts of the country’s 64 districts were supported. The second phase (2007–2011), expanded the program’s reach threefold. The program is of particular interest because of its ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:52 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:52 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"A study on the Indian state of Gujarat estimated that reducing to 1 hour a day the time spent fetching water by women would allow the women to increase their incomes by $100 yearly using the time saved (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP] 2006)"(3)."It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:52 p.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:52 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)"If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea"(3)
Oct. 26, 2017, 12:58 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1, LO-PRACTICE-1, LO-DATA-3

"98 percent were currently or previously had been homeless"(para 8). These results are from a study of 105 Native women in Minnesota who had been sexually trafficked (ENB-Coder Comment)
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

In Table 4.1 it shows that the percent of women living above poverty, aged 18 and older in 2013 was 84.5% (125)
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

Figure 4.4 shows poverty rates by gender and race/ethnicity in 2013. In general, 15.5% of women live in poverty and 11.9% of men live in poverty. For Native Americans, it’s 28.1% for women and 24.4% for men. For Black Americans, 25.7% of women live in poverty and 20.4% of men live in poverty. For Hispanic Americans, 24% of women and 17.3% of men live in poverty. For Asian/Pacific Islander Americans, 13% of women and 12.2% of men live in poverty. For white Americans, 11.7% of women and 9.1% of men live in poverty. For women and men of other races or who are multiracial, it’s 19.7% and 15.3% for women ...more
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“In 2009, Social Security lifted more than 14 million women and men aged 65 and older above the poverty line; without Social Security’s programs, one-third of women in the United States aged 65–74 and half of women aged 75 and older would be poor” (142)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“More than one in five millennial [those aged 16–34 in 2013] women (22.4 percent) lives below the poverty line, compared with one in six (16.8 percent) millennial men…Millennial women are most likely to be poor if they live in Mississippi (33.9 percent), and least likely to be poor if they live in Alaska or Maryland (14.0 percent each)” (128)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Mississippi…ranks last on the percentage of women above poverty, and among the bottom ten on the percentage of women with health insurance coverage and with a bachelor’s degree or higher. Mississippi’s best ranking is on women-owned businesses, where the state comes in 30th place, in the middle third” (124)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Immigrant women are more likely than U.S.-born women to live in poverty (19.7 percent compared with 14.7 percent)” (131)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“The percent of women living above poverty, however, declined from 87.9 in 2002 to 85.5 in 2013” (126)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“IWPR [Institute for Women’s Policy Research] analysis of data from the Current Population Survey (U.S. Department of Commerce 2014a) indicates that 14.5 percent of women aged 18 and older in 2013 had family incomes that placed them below the federal poverty line, compared with 11.0 percent of men” (139)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Poverty rates also differ substantially among detailed racial and ethnic groups. Among Hispanic women, those of Honduran (30.8 percent) and Guatemalan (30.1 percent) descent had the highest poverty rates, with rates that were more than twice as high as the group with the lowest rate, women of Argentinian descent (11.7 percent). Among Asian/Pacific Islander women, the groups with the highest poverty rates—those who identify as Hmong and Bangladeshi (25.8 percent and 25.7 percent)—are more than three times as likely to be poor as those who identify as Filipino and Indian, who are the least likely to be poor and have poverty rates of 7.0 and 8.4 percent, respectively. Native American ...more
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Women in Alaska are the least likely to live in poverty; more than nine in ten (91.0 percent) women in this state live in families with incomes above the federal poverty line. New Hampshire and Maryland rank second and third, with 90.8 and 89.6 percent of women living above poverty. Women are the most likely to live in poverty in Mississippi, where only 75.7 percent of women have family incomes above the poverty line. In New Mexico and Louisiana, the second and third worst states on this indicator, 78.5 percent and 80.0 percent of women live above poverty” (140)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Women who live with a same-sex partner are more likely to live in poverty than women married to men (7.4 percent compared with 6.2 percent) and men living with a same-sex partner (3.5 percent). Single women and women who live with (but are not married to) a different-sex partner have much higher poverty rates at 24.5 and 14.3 percent, respectively” (135)
June 16, 2017, 4:27 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Native American women have the highest poverty rate at 28.1 percent, followed by black (25.7 percent) and Hispanic (24.0 percent) women. The poverty rate for white women is the lowest among the groups shown in Figure 4.4 and is less than half the rate for Native American, black, and Hispanic women (11.7 percent)” (141)
March 10, 2017, 1:21 p.m.
Countries: Cape Verde
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Despite a substantial reduction in poverty rates over time, from 49 per cent in 1990 to approximately 25 per cent in 2007, poverty and inequality remain prevalent. Of those living in poverty in 2007, around 72 per cent lived in rural areas, 56 per cent were women and 95 per cent had little to no education"(4)."In 2013, the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women expressed concern that rural women faced many difficulties with regard to poverty, access to housing and to clean water and sanitation services (see CEDAW/C/CPV/CO/7-8, para. 30). The Committee was concerned that the absence of a land registration system prevented rural women from using ownership ...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:18 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"The decline was mostly concentrated among less-educated women and was likely to have been poverty-driven. Living conditions in Iraq deteriorated during the embargo and have failed to improve after 2003. Nearly 25 percent of Iraqis live below the poverty line, and many families still rely on the public distribution system for basic food items" (18).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:50 a.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“The smallest proportions of both women (16 percent) and men (14 percent) are in the lowest wealth quintile. Almost half of the population (48 percent of women and 49 percent of men) is in the two highest wealth quintiles” (34).
July 27, 2016, 10:05 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Forty-four percent of women and 46 percent of men are in the two highest wealth quintiles, while an equal proportion of both sexes (19 percent each) are in the lowest wealth quintile” (35).