The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CL-DATA-1

July 11, 2019, 5:35 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"High rates of poverty and malnutrition among women and girls, especially those who belong to disadvantaged and marginalized communities, who reportedly have limited access to social security benefits and programme" (11).
June 19, 2019, 8:49 p.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Nevertheless, the Committee is concerned about the disproportionate levels of poverty among women and the lack of initiatives to increase tax collection for social expenditure" (13). Specific data not provided (CCS-CODER COMMENT).
June 10, 2019, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"The poverty index for 2012 showed an estimated gender inequality index at 0.582 points placing the country at the position 125 from 187 countries. This was however an improvement when compared to the estimation of 0.718 of 2008, i.e. 111 position among 169 countries (UNDP, Human Development Reports, 2010 and 2013). Poverty indexes in families headed by women are estimated at 58%, a drop of 4 percentage points when compared to the previous year" (8-9),
June 4, 2019, 4:55 p.m.
Countries: Austria
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"According to EU-SILC data (Statistics on Income and Living Conditions) for the year 2015, women in Austria are at higher risk of poverty or exclusion than men (19 and 16 per cent, respectively). At 18 per cent, female pensioners who live alone have a higher risk of poverty than male pensioners who live alone (14 per cent). Single-parent households — these are mainly single mothers and their children — have the highest risk of exclusion (42 per cent) of all household categories" (40),
June 2, 2019, 7:22 p.m.
Countries: Taiwan
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"NGOs reported that the monthly take home pay of some domestic workers was as low as 6.7 percent of the official poverty level" (p. 21).
May 28, 2019, 9:31 p.m.
Countries: Czech Republic
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"The Committee commends the State party for its achievements in combating poverty and notes that it ranks among the top new States members of the European Union in that regard. The Committee is, however, concerned about the some 30,000 persons, in particular women, who do not have decent housing" (10).
May 27, 2019, 1:48 p.m.
Countries: Netherlands
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"The Committee notes with concern that women and children are at a higher risk of poverty than men and that women accumulate lower pension benefits than men, resulting in higher poverty rates among older women. The Committee also notes with concern that informal care is provided mostly by women, which hampers their economic independence" (12).
Feb. 23, 2019, 11:34 a.m.
Countries: D R Congo
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Congolese women continue to have limited access to national economic resources and factors of production. This situation has deteriorated in recent years, especially due to the negative impact of repeated wars and permanent insecurity, particularly in eastern parts of the country. As a result, 61.2 per cent of women live below the poverty line, compared to 38.8 per cent of men (...) In general, women are poorly represented in paid employment and tend to work primarily in the agricultural and informal sectors, often in family businesses. Although they play an important role in the economy, they do not own productive assets, such as land and agricultural inputs, and do not...more
Dec. 21, 2018, 3:53 p.m.
Countries: Chile
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"It is observed that 12.1% of women live in poverty by income, while 11.2% of men do. A significant decrease of men and women in situation of poverty by income is observed betwen 2006 and 2013. However, it is worth noting that poverty concentratates regularly to a greater extent in women" (5). The graph analyzing multimensional poverty shows that 20,4% of women are found in this situation, while the percentage for men is of 21,4% (6). Table 9 shows poverty rates disaggregated by sex and by area. In urban areas, 3.2% of women (258,593) and 2.9% of men (205,397) live in extreme poverty. In rural areas, 7.3% of women (81,576)...more
Sept. 4, 2018, 10:19 a.m.
Countries: Laos
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Poverty continued to affect women disproportionately, especially in rural and ethnic minority communities. While rural women were responsible for more than half of total agricultural production, the additional burdens of housework and child rearing also fell primarily on women" (20-21).
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: SMES-DATA-2, CL-DATA-1

“IWPR analysis of data from the Current Population Survey (U.S. Department of Commerce 2014a) indicates that 14.5 percent of women aged 18 and older in 2013 had family incomes that placed them below the federal poverty line, compared with 11.0 percent of men” (139)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Older women (65 and older) are more likely to live in poverty than older men (11.3 percent compared with 7.4 percent)” (142)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Native American women have the highest poverty rate at 28.1 percent, followed by black (25.7 percent) and Hispanic (24.0 percent) women. The poverty rate for white women is the lowest among the groups shown in Figure 4.4 and is less than half the rate for Native American, black, and Hispanic women (11.7 percent). For each of the largest racial and ethnic groups, women’s poverty rate is higher than men’s; the difference is greatest between Hispanic women and men” (141)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“More than one in five millennial women (22.4 percent) lives below the poverty line, compared with one in six (16.8 percent) millennial men (Appendix Table B4.5). Millennial women’s poverty rate is higher than the rate for adult women overall” (128)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1, DLB-DATA-1

“The National Alliance for Caregivers and AARP study (2009) found that, on average, caregivers spent 20 hours per week providing care, rising to almost 40 hours per week for those who lived with the person who needed care. The weekly time spent is not much lower for those who are employed: the 2014 Older Adult Caregiver Study found that adults who worked full-time while providing care for someone aged 50 and older spent a median of 16 hours per week on such care (Matos 2014). Time spent on support for parents and in-laws is twice as high for families living in poverty than it is for high-income families” (91)more
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“The percent of women living above poverty, however, declined from 87.9 in 2002 to 85.5 in 2013” (126)
Aug. 31, 2018, 10:10 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“Immigrant women are more likely than U.S.-born women to live in poverty (19.7 percent compared with 14.7 percent). Among the ten largest sending countries, immigrant women from the Dominican Republic (30.3 percent), Mexico (30.0 percent), Cuba (22.6 percent), and El Salvador (20.8 percent) have the highest poverty rates. Immigrant women from India (5.7 percent), the Philippines (6.9 percent), and Canada (11.1 percent) have the lowest poverty rates” (131)
Aug. 6, 2018, 2:45 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: CL-DATA-1

“The disproportionately high risk of poverty among women with disabilities owing to their very low employment rate, because their earnings and/or the benefits they receive are frequently shared or entirely used by their families” (12)
June 8, 2018, 1:24 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"The Committee is concerned about the precarious situation of women in rural areas, who are disproportionately affected by poverty and have limited access to education, employment, social security and health care. The Committee also notes with concern that women in rural areas are exposed to particularly discriminatory stereotypes about the traditional roles of women which, among other things, prevent them from participating in key domestic decisions. The Committee, in line with its general recommendation No. 34 (2016) on the rights of rural women, recommends that the State party develop and implement measures, including temporary special measures, to accelerate the achievement of substantive equality for rural women in all areas in...more
April 11, 2018, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Burkina Faso
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Poverty is significantly higher among women (47.1 per cent) than men (45.7 per cent)" (10).
March 14, 2018, 6:54 p.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: CL-DATA-1, LO-LAW-1, LBHO-LAW-2

"The Committee notes with appreciation the introduction of temporary special measures to accelerate women’s political participation, but remains concerned that no other temporary special measures have been introduced as part of a necessary strategy to accelerate the achievement of substantive equality of women and men in all areas of the Convention in which women are underrepresented or disadvantaged, including with regard to access to land and higher education and to the increased feminization of poverty. The Committee encourages the State party to use temporary special measures, in accordance with article 4 (1) of the Convention and the Committee’s general recommendation No. 25 on the subject, as a necessary component of...more
March 7, 2018, 9:50 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"In 2014, 28.5 million women were registered in situations of poverty, 78.4% of the population speaking an indigenous language. PROSPERA has a 25% that are indigenous women in its register and 95% of the transfers are to women in families in poor economic condition. 5158 community soup kitchens have been installed in 21 federal entities and 453 in municipalities of the National Crusade against Hunger (CNcH)" (page 33).
Dec. 13, 2017, 11:35 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"The broad areas of the SDGs are fighting poverty, inequality and injustice, and handling the fallout from climate change" (para 4).
Dec. 5, 2017, 10:38 a.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: ERBG-DATA-3, CL-DATA-1

"Women commonly face difficulties in reconciling responsibilities in the care economy—particularly the minding and educating of children of pre-school age—and employment on farms. In addition to modes of remuneration, the unavailability of public child-care services combined with poor transportation services may lead women to bring children with them to work on plantations. This has been documented in the horticultural sector in Punjab (Gill 2001), and in informal settlements established near plantations during the working season in South Africa (Barrientos, Dolan, and Tallontire 2003)"(47)
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:32 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: SMES-DATA-1, SMES-DATA-2, CL-DATA-1

"The program [The Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program] was designed, in part, to address poor women’s lack of income"(para 54)
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:02 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"The southwestern province of Yunnan in the People’s Republic of China is poor relative to the national average. Poor women members of ethnic minorities suffer most, with almost no income opportunities outside of agriculture. In 2009, a pilot project for community-based rural road maintenance by groups of ethnic minority women was launched in western Yunnan Province, with a $200,000 grant from the Asian Development Bank’s Gender and Development Cooperation Fund. The women’s groups numbered 21 and comprised 163 women. Some 55% of of the women were members of ethnic minorities, and 92% were from families living below the poverty line"(58)
Nov. 29, 2017, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Women may typically acquire assets through the market, but low earnings and little collateral most commonly limit this opportunity. Women are not remunerated for the work they do in their traditional roles, and their earnings are typically low when they do have some source of income. They also typically have less knowledge about land markets and legal registration requirements. The combination of these factors may explain why in the Indian state of Karnataka, for instance, only 16% of women land owners acquired land through purchase (Swaminathan, Suchitra, and Lahoti 2011, p. 39)"(27)."Women commonly face difficulties in reconciling responsibilities in the care economy—particularly the minding and educating of children of pre-school...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:09 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"Support for women’s economic empowerment has also included construction of rural markets with spaces reserved for women vendors, employment opportunities for destitute women in road construction and maintenance, and helping women farmers diversify into cash crops that yield higher incomes (Box 4)"(39)."Bangladesh’s Challenging the Frontiers of Poverty Reduction—Targeting the Ultra-poor, launched in 2002 by the NGO BRAC, is a prime example of such a program. During its first phase (2002–2006), 100,000 ultra-poor women and their households living in 15 of the most food insecure districts of the country’s 64 districts were supported. The second phase (2007–2011), expanded the program’s reach threefold. The program is of particular interest because of its...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:52 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:52 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-DATA-1

"A study on the Indian state of Gujarat estimated that reducing to 1 hour a day the time spent fetching water by women would allow the women to increase their incomes by $100 yearly using the time saved (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP] 2006)"(3)."It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were...more