The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CL-PRACTICE-1

Nov. 10, 2017, 4:49 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)."If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea"(3)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:49 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea, and 182% of the total tax revenue of India"(3-4)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:49 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"A study on the Indian state of Gujarat estimated that reducing to 1 hour a day the time spent fetching water by women would allow the women to increase their incomes by $100 yearly using the time saved (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP] 2006)"(3)."It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:49 p.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)
Aug. 28, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The ratio of men and women in the labor force in the Solomon Islands has remained relatively stagnant over the past decade, largely a product of gender inequalities in education, training, household responsibilities, and cultural attitudes about the role of women"(para 3)."One factor that could significantly impact GDP is the restructuring of the division of labor in the country’s unpaid care economy. According to the Asian Development Bank, 'women spend twice as much time on household work and four times more on childcare' – neither of which is accounted for in the calculation of GDP. Likewise, women’s overrepresentation in subsistence work inhibits their ability to contribute significantly to GDP"(para 5)more
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:55 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"Son you should focus on your studies instead of wasting your time playing on your phone at all times. You need to study hard! After all, you will be the one who shall take care of us when we are old and eventually inherit our property". The father tells his son this at 0:01. He also has a daughter (ENB-Coder Comment).At 0:23 the son says his mother takes care of the children as well as the household (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:04 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"TBILISI, Georgia – The camera zooms in, panning across a marble mantle covered with family photos of three young boys and their happy, smiling parents, then stops on what studies have shown is a statistically uncommon sight in Georgia: A father – in this case Zviad Kvaratskhelia, best-selling author and publisher – sitting in his living room, spending the day alone with his kids – Nikoloz, age 5, Demetre, 3, and Alexandre, 1"(para 1)."'I had never spent time alone with my kids before. They found it bizarre at first to see me changing diapers and cooking for them,' says Zviad. 'But we mustn’t take our families for granted. We must ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 5:34 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, DMW-PRACTICE-1

"In every field my parents are different from others. Some people think that girls should not play and that they are meant merely to carry out kitchen duties". This statement was made at 1:38 by a 14 year old girl Saima (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 8, 2017, 5:51 p.m.
Countries: Belgium, Nepal
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"The education of mothers or parents has also been linked to their children eating more nutritious and diverse diets: see, for example, Khanal et al. (2013) on Nepalese infants or Vereecken et al. (2004) on Flemish preschoolers"(59). This could possibly be due to mothers doing the meal preparation (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 8, 2017, 5:49 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"Public campaigns and education, including the large-scale training of women in the preparation of traditional low-fat, high-vegetable meals, has led to Korean diets that resulted in the consumption of more of these meals than might be predicted, given the country’s relatively high average incomes"(14). As the campaign focused on women, it is probable that women are primarily responsible for the cooking, which may also mean they provide caring labor (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 7, 2017, 4:16 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"According to one critic, for example, Japan’s 'gendered status quo' continues to 'allocate productive roles to men and reproductive roles to women.' Consequently, despite having one of the most liberal paid parental leave policies worldwide, only 2 percent of fathers take any of their leave, leaving the burden of childcare to fall on the mother. Perhaps not surprisingly then, 68 percent of mothers in Japan quit their jobs upon marriage or childbirth. Among the women that do remain economically active, the majority seek part-time or irregular employment"(para 5)."For example, Taisei Corporation, one of Japan’s largest construction companies has not only asked all fathers to take parental leave, but has also ...more
July 6, 2017, 9:42 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: ERBG-PRACTICE-2, CL-PRACTICE-1

"According to one critic, for example, Japan’s 'gendered status quo' continues to 'allocate productive roles to men and reproductive roles to women.' Consequently, despite having one of the most liberal paid parental leave policies worldwide, only 2 percent of fathers take any of their leave, leaving the burden of childcare to fall on the mother. Perhaps not surprisingly then, 68 percent of mothers in Japan quit their jobs upon marriage or childbirth" (para 5).
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

Figure 3.3 shows women’s share of part-time workers by main reason for part-time work in 2013. For those who turn to part-time work because they have other family or personal obligations, women make up 90.1% of them. And for people who have child care problems and therefore must do part-time work, women make up 93.9% (92)
April 25, 2017, 5:21 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"Last year, family counselor Harumi Takakusagi received some 30 inquiries about terminating in-law relations, up sharply from the one or two per year she was used to receiving in the past, possibly because word of the procedure has spread through the internet. Most came from women in their 40s and 50s who either lived with, or in close proximity to, in-laws and want to avoid being responsible for their nursing care, Takakusagi said. 'Aged people take it for granted that they will be cared for by their daughters in-law, but often they struggle because they want to live their own lives after the death of their husbands,' she said. Under ...more
March 10, 2017, 12:20 p.m.
Countries: Cape Verde
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"Studies also reveal that women tend to spend more time than men doing non-paid work within the household 18, which may limit their ability to fully realize their potential in the 'normal' cash employment market.Combined with the following statement we often hear during our fieldwork -- that the partner with the cash-paying job (or higher cash-paying job) tends to fill out the original property paperwork in his or her name only – a women’s non-remunerative household work appears to be a contributing factor to the disproportionate impact on women in uniões de facto. Moreover, the rate of de facto unions is highest among lower-income households"(10)
March 2, 2017, 3:49 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: LRCM-DATA-1, CL-PRACTICE-1

"She met women who had paid as much as £25,000 in dowry before being abandoned, women raped by their new husbands, some who were used to have a child and then abandoned and others left in India to act as carers and domestic slaves for their in-laws" (para 19).
Feb. 17, 2017, 8:01 a.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"Given Guatemala's patriarchal and macho culture that tends to view women as child-bearers, Maczchen said most people are surprised she is still unmarried at the age of 21. 'I would have had several children by now and dropped out of school. I broke away from those chains,' she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in a telephone interview" (pare 21-22).
Feb. 9, 2017, 4:56 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Evidence from the Young Lives project in Ethiopia suggests that 52% of rural girls between five and eight years old are engaged in care work compared to 38% of rural boys - and that one-quarter of these young girls spend three or more hours daily on unpaid care" (para 7).
Feb. 8, 2017, 5:38 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"and in Korea, men are allotted the equivalent of about 16 weeks of paid [parental] leave" (para 6).
Feb. 8, 2017, 5:38 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"In Japan, almost half of all of the available paid leave for new parents – 30 weeks – is earmarked for new fathers" (para 6).
Feb. 8, 2017, 5:38 p.m.
Countries: Cyprus, Ireland, Israel, New Zealand, Switzerland, Turkey
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"In fact, in six countries – Cyprus, Israel, Turkey, Ireland, Switzerland and New Zealand – maternity leave accounts for all available paid leave related to the birth or care of a child. No leave is available for new fathers" (para 5).
Feb. 8, 2017, 5:38 p.m.
Countries: Iceland, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"Portugal, Norway, Luxembourg and Iceland are also relatively generous in this regard, mandating about two months of leave or more for new dads" (para 6).
Feb. 8, 2017, 5:37 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"In almost half of two-parent households, both parents now work full-time, and in 40% of all families with children, the mother is the sole or primary breadwinner. At the same time, fathers – virtually all of whom are in the labor force – are taking on more child care responsibilities, as fatherhood has grown to encompass far more than just bringing home the bacon" (para 1).
Feb. 2, 2017, 6:09 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"'I can’t say everything is equal inside the [Kurdish] home now,' Ms. Bestas said. 'But women are now comfortable saying, ‘If I’m in the kitchen, you should be in the kitchen too.’' And when the woman is the breadwinner, husbands are expected to do the lion’s share of the housework; when they don’t, the women can go to a women’s center to complain formally" (para 21).
Feb. 2, 2017, 7:39 a.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"Childcare remains a sticky issue in a country in which social norms still dictate that women are the primary child carers" (para 13).
Feb. 1, 2017, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, CL-PRACTICE-2

"Once married, the new bride cannot return to visit her parents without permission, which is given sparingly, so that the bonds to her old home will weaken. She must show her submission to the new family: She is not allowed to speak the names of her in-laws, because it is seen as too familiar, and in some places she is not allowed to use words that begin with the same letters as her in-laws’ names, requiring the invention of a large parallel vocabulary. Each morning, before she is allowed to eat, the daughter-in-law must wash the feet of her husband’s parents and then drink the water she has used to ...more
Jan. 27, 2017, 12:31 p.m.
Countries: Bhutan
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"'Gender inequality in Bhutan has mainly been attributed to the following root causes:...traditional inheritance patterns of family property (matrilineal especially in the western and central regions, which implies the moral obligation for women to take care of their parents)"(16)
Jan. 24, 2017, 2:04 p.m.
Countries: South Sudan
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, SEGI-PRACTICE-1, RISW-PRACTICE-1

"During the Localization workshop in Yei County, all participants expressed personal commitments to move the implementation forward. Representatives from the Block Education Office promised to disseminate key information to their superiors and co-workers. Religious leaders from different faiths agreed to share the importance of UNSCR 1325 and 1820 with their congregations as well. Many of the male participants committed to inform their wives and children about their rights in accordance with the pillars of UNSCR 1325. Moreover, those with children agreed to divide household chores evenly instead of by traditional gender roles, teaching boys that it is normal for them to cook, clean and do the laundry" (para 10).more
Dec. 2, 2016, 5:11 p.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1

"The study showed that daily housework is done predominantly by women (in more than two thirds of cases, it is mostly done by women) – women prepare meals, do the washing up or load the dishwasher, do the laundry, clean the house and iron much more frequently than men or couples together. The more demanding chores are distributed more equally: for the most part men, do small repairs in the apartment or house, maintain outdoor areas and look after the car; gardening is done equally by both partners; in nearly two thirds of cases, couples decide on home interior design and maintenance and/or house construction or renovation together; where this ...more
Nov. 17, 2016, 4:20 p.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1

"Mothers who have children disabled since birth and who raised those children to the age of eight have a right to begin receiving a pension five years before the standard retirement age (which is 55), and women who have at least 20 years on the job have a right to retire at age 54 (38)" (The fact that this benefits appears to only be extended working mothers implies that mothers are expected to provide at least a majority of care for dependents (ASM--CODER COMMENT)