The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CLCC-LAW-1

Aug. 28, 2017, 12:18 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Those eligible for the card include children of Qatari women married to foreigners, people with special talents 'needed by the state,' and others who have extended notable services to the country, it said. Citizenship, however, will remain off-limits to foreigners" (para 3).
Aug. 14, 2017, 12:46 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"In line with the GCC, Qatar has always enforced citizenship laws that pass down citizenship only from father to child" (para 6). The other five members of the GCC are Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Oman. As such it can be inferred that citizenship laws in these countries also follow the pattern of patrilineality (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
Aug. 14, 2017, 12:42 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Just last week, Qatar approved a draft law that gives permanent residency status to certain noncitizens, including children of Qatari women married to non-Qatari men" (para 1). "In line with the GCC, Qatar has always enforced citizenship laws that pass down citizenship only from father to child. Being born in Qatar gives one no claim to citizenship: Even children of Qatari women married to non-Qatari men do not get citizenship upon birth" (para 6).
July 5, 2017, 4:22 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"This step comes after the adoption of the domestic violence law in April 2014 that guarantees more protection for women and children from violence in a household. But organizations still ask for this law to be changed to improve protection for women, as well as a regulation against early marriage and the right of women to pass their nationality on to their children" (para 10).
June 21, 2017, 12:01 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"A man who loved me had proposed, and we were married — not in Saudi Arabia or in Dubai, but by a civil marriage from a law court in Canada. Under Saudi rules, a woman (or a Saudi man) cannot marry a non-Saudi without official permission, and my planned marriage did not pass whatever test was applied. Because my marriage is not recognized, neither is my second child. The government will not grant him a visa" (p 13)
May 24, 2017, 4:04 p.m.
Countries: Bahrain, Barbados, Brunei, Burundi, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malaysia, Mauritania, Nepal, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Togo, United Arab Emirates
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"[Nationality laws] discriminate against mothers in their ability to confer nationality on their children" (p 3)
May 24, 2017, 4:03 p.m.
Countries: Barbados, Madagascar, Malaysia, United States
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"[Nationality laws] discriminate against unmarried fathers in their ability to confer nationality on their children" (p 4)
May 5, 2017, 12:49 p.m.
Countries: Slovakia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Children acquire citizenship by birth to at least one citizen parent, regardless of where the child is born" (18).
April 21, 2017, 10:33 a.m.
Countries: Netherlands
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Citizenship can be derived from either the mother or the father" (14).
April 6, 2017, 11:13 a.m.
Countries: Libya
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"By law children derive Libyan citizenship only from a citizen father. Citizen women alone were unable to transmit citizenship to offspring, but there are naturalization provisions for noncitizens" (20). "Women are unable to confer their nationality to their children if their husbands are not citizens" (26). "By law children derive citizenship only from a citizen father. Citizen women alone were unable to transmit citizenship to offspring" (26).
March 28, 2017, 9:15 a.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"A child acquires the country’s citizenship at birth if both parents are citizens, if the mother is a citizen, or if the father is a citizen and is married to the child’s foreign mother. If a mixed-nationality couple had obtained a judicial separation at the time when the child was conceived, however, the child acquires the mother’s citizenship" (12).
March 24, 2017, 1:19 p.m.
Countries: Czech Republic
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Any child with at least one citizen parent is automatically a citizen" (17).
March 24, 2017, 1:11 p.m.
Countries: Haiti
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Citizenship is derived through an individual’s parents; only one parent of either sex is necessary to transmit citizenship" (27).
March 7, 2017, 10:54 a.m.
Countries: Gambia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Children derive citizenship by birth within the country’s territory or through either parent; however, not all parents registered births" (22).
March 3, 2017, 9:06 a.m.
Countries: Finland
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"A child may obtain citizenship from either the mother or father regardless of the place of birth and may also acquire citizenship if the child is born in the country and would otherwise be stateless" (8).
Feb. 23, 2017, 12:02 p.m.
Countries: Estonia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Either citizen parent may pass citizenship to a child regardless of the other parent’s citizenship status" (11).
Feb. 17, 2017, 11:49 a.m.
Countries: Ecuador
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Citizenship is acquired through birth in the country, birth to an Ecuadorian mother or father abroad, or by naturalization" (32).
Feb. 8, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Cote D'Ivoire
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"At least one parent must be a citizen for a child to be considered Ivoirian at birth" (22).
Feb. 8, 2017, 2:26 p.m.
Countries: Croatia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Citizenship is derived by birth in the country’s territory or from at least one parent who is a citizen" (12).
Feb. 2, 2017, 12:33 p.m.
Countries: D R Congo
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"The law provides for the acquisition of citizenship through birth within the country or from either parent being of an ethnic group documented as having been located in the country in 1960" (29).
Jan. 31, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Good enough to bear them, feed them, bathe them, and raise them — but in 27 countries around the world, by law, mothers cannot pass their citizenship on to their children, as fathers can...Syrian refugees born in Lebanon, for instance, may be in especially dire straitsbecause so many of their fathers are dead or missing; Lebanon and Syria are among the 27 countries, and Lebanon is among the most restrictive" (para 1-3).
Jan. 31, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Iran, Qatar
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"The laws vary, but in the most restrictive countries, like Iran and Qatar, women cannot pass on their citizenship even if that means their children are left stateless, according to a tally by the United Nations" (para 2).
Jan. 31, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"The laws vary, but in the most restrictive countries, like Iran and Qatar, women cannot pass on their citizenship even if that means their children are left stateless, according to a tally by the United Nations. In some others, like Nepal or the United Arab Emirates, exceptions can be made if the father is unknown or stateless himself. (Many Palestinians are.)" (para 2). "A 2011 royal decree in the Emirates opened the door ever so slightly, giving the children of Emirati women married to foreigners the right to apply for citizenship when they turn 18" (para 5).
Jan. 31, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"The laws vary, but in the most restrictive countries, like Iran and Qatar, women cannot pass on their citizenship even if that means their children are left stateless, according to a tally by the United Nations. In some others, like Nepal or the United Arab Emirates, exceptions can be made if the father is unknown or stateless himself. (Many Palestinians are.)" (para 2).
Jan. 31, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Suriname
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Suriname amended its nationality law in 2014 to allow women to pass citizenship to their children" (para 5).
Jan. 31, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Good enough to bear them, feed them, bathe them, and raise them — but in 27 countries around the world, by law, mothers cannot pass their citizenship on to their children, as fathers can...Syrian refugees born in Lebanon, for instance, may be in especially dire straits because so many of their fathers are dead or missing; Lebanon and Syria are among the 27 countries, and Lebanon is among the most restrictive" (para 1-3).
Jan. 31, 2017, 10:28 a.m.
Countries: Comoros
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"Any child having at least one Comoran parent is considered a citizen, regardless of where the birth takes place" (11).
Jan. 24, 2017, 11:25 a.m.
Countries: Brunei
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"While citizenship is automatically inherited from citizen fathers, citizen mothers may pass their nationality to their children only through an application process through which children are first issued a COI" (15-16). "Citizenship is derived from one’s father, or, following an application process, mother" (16).
Jan. 11, 2017, 10:33 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

"By law citizenship may be derived by birth to a mother and father who are not ethnic Khmer if both parents were born and were living legally in the country or if either parent had acquired citizenship" (22).
Jan. 4, 2017, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: CLCC-LAW-1

“Citizenship is derived only through the father. Women do not have the legal right to transmit citizenship to their children. Children of female citizens married to noncitizen husbands receive the nationality of the father and lose the right to attend public school or seek other government services if they do not hold legal residency, which must be applied for every year and is not assured” (22). “In guidelines announced by the government in November 2014, if children of Jordanian mothers and noncitizen fathers apply and meet certain criteria they may gain access to certain services enjoyed by citizens, including access to free primary and secondary education and subsidized health care; ...more