The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
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Latest items for CLCC-PRACTICE-1

Aug. 10, 2017, 11:30 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"The Govt of Punjab also introduced the Women Empowerment Packages, through which birth registration for girls was made free and compulsory across the province, with an aim to prevent early marriages" (11).
Feb. 10, 2017, 4:34 p.m.
Countries: Kazakhstan
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"While noting the progress made by the State party in registering persons with underdetermined nationality and ensuring their access to basic services, the Committee is concerned that there still exist stateless persons, including women and girls, who continue to face difficulties in gaining access to education, health care and other services owing to the lack of identification documents and proof of residence in the State party. The Committee is also concerned that a considerable number of childbirths are not registered in the State party" (7)
Jan. 24, 2017, 11:25 a.m.
Countries: Brunei
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"Birth registration is universal and equal for girls and boys, except among indigenous Dusun and Iban people in rural areas" (16).
Jan. 3, 2017, 9:59 p.m.
Countries: Brazil
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“Citizenship is derived from birth in the country or from a parent. According to 2010 IBGE census data, there were approximately 600,000 unregistered children under the age of 10 nationwide. Without birth certificates children cannot be vaccinated or enrolled in school. If the problem persists into adulthood, an unregistered adult cannot obtain a worker’s card or receive retirement benefits” (14, 15). “The National Council of Justice, in partnership with the Secretariat of Human Rights (SDH), aimed to reduce the number of such [unregistered] children by registering children born in maternity wards. The National Documentation of Rural Workers initiative offered assistance in obtaining identification cards, birth certificates for children born in ...more
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:26 p.m.
Countries: Portugal
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“Citizenship is derived by birth within the country’s territory and from one’s parents. Authorities registered all births” (11).
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:24 p.m.
Countries: Malta
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1, CLCC-LAW-1

“Citizenship is derived by birth within the country’s territory and from one’s parents. Parents may pass citizenship to their children, although the law allows transmission of citizenship by a grandparent or other relative in certain circumstances. Births were registered immediately” (10).
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:24 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1, CLCC-LAW-1

“A child acquires citizenship automatically when the parents are citizens, when the parents of children born in the country’s territory are unknown or stateless, or when the parents are foreigners whose countries of origin do not recognize the citizenship of their children born abroad. Citizenship is also granted if a child is abandoned in the country and in cases of adoption. Local authorities required immediate birth registration. Unaccompanied minors entering the country automatically receive a residence permit” (15).
Dec. 29, 2016, 12:21 p.m.
Countries: Bulgaria
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"The law requires the registration of all births within seven days without discriminating between boys and girls. Authorities did not register children born to asylum seekers, however, until the mother received either refugee or humanitarian status" (22).
Oct. 8, 2016, 4:07 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“Table 2.12 shows that birth registration is higher in urban (23 percent) than in rural (19 percent) areas. There is no difference regarding the extent of birth registration among male and female children” (20).
Sept. 14, 2016, 4:05 p.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“Almost equal proportions of male and female children had been registered, but children age 2-4 were more likely than those under age 2 to have been registered (31 percent and 29 percent, respectively)” (21).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:55 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“Almost equal proportions of male and female children had been registered, but children age 2-4 were more likely than those under age 2 to have been registered (31 percent and 29 percent, respectively)” (21).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:50 a.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“There is little age or sex differential nationally in the percentage of children registered” (23).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:47 a.m.
Countries: Nigeria
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“Almost equal proportions of male and female children had been registered, but children age 2-4 were more likely than those under age 2 to have been registered (31 percent and 29 percent, respectively)” (21).
Sept. 12, 2016, 3:46 a.m.
Countries: Swaziland
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“The SDHS reveals that there is no difference in birth registration according to sex” (25).
July 27, 2016, 10:06 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“There is no difference regarding the extent of birth registration among male and female children” (22).
May 19, 2016, 11 a.m.
Countries: Cameroon
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1, CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"Many girls, in particular in the Bakassi zone, are not registered at birth owing to the lack of legal literacy, financial barriers and long distances to civil registration offices, which prevents girls from obtaining personal documents, from accessing social security, health-care education and, eventually, formal employment, and from benefiting from accurate age-verification mechanisms to curtail child marriages" (7).
May 15, 2016, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Montenegro
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1, CLCC-LAW-1

"Montenegrin citizenship through origin shall be acquired by a child: A) Whose both parents are of Montenegrin citizenship at the moment of birth B) Born on the territory of Montenegro, one of whose parents is Montenegrin citizen at the moment of birth C) Born on the territory of another state, one of whose parents is a Montenegrin citizen at the moment of birth, the other one being stateless, of unknown citizenship or unknown D) Born on the territory of another state, one of whose parents is a Montenegrin citizen at the moment of birth, provided that he/she will become stateless otherwise." (42, 43)
April 27, 2016, 9:05 a.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“Coverage of birth registration varies little by the child’s age and sex, but varies widely across regions, with the Western Region reporting the highest coverage (61 percent) and the Northern Region reporting the lowest coverage (42 percent)” (29).
April 26, 2016, 2:15 p.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

“There is little variation by age or sex in the proportion of children registered” (17).
March 29, 2016, 11:14 p.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee [the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women] reiterates its concern that nationality can be acquired and transferred, with few exceptions, only through a husband or father of Kuwaiti nationality, which disproportionately affects stateless persons, including the Bidoun – 'illegal residents', and its concern about the lack of birth certificates and other identification documents of children of stateless Bidoun women and men married to non-Kuwaitis" (11)
Feb. 29, 2016, 9:23 a.m.
Countries: Ukraine
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

""No, baby girls and baby boys are all registered equally when they are born here in Ukraine. There are no hindrances due to that later in life either. All can vote, although women are less likely to because they are less educated, particularly in the villages." Lada Usova" (7)
Jan. 23, 2016, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1, CLCC-LAW-1

"Indeed, according to the 2010 amendments, those newly entitled to Indian status cannot transmit their status if they have a female rather than a male First Nations ancestor. In addition, pursuant to the 1985 amendments, children of mothers registered under section 6 (2) who have unstated fathers cannot be eligible for registration. Given the high rates of unstated and/or unrecognised paternity, Aboriginal women are more adversely affected by non-registration and non-membership than men and as a result cannot access the rights and benefits for their children conferred by registration and membership," (7).
Jan. 6, 2016, 10:50 p.m.
Countries: Bosnia-Herzegovina
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee is concerned about the lack of effective implementation of universal birth registration in the State party, in particular among Roma women and girls, which places them at risk of statelessness and hinders their access to basic services. It notes with concern that the lack of information, as well as the existence of administrative and financial obstacles, may prevent Roma women from registering births and obtaining birth certificates" (9)
Dec. 19, 2015, 11:08 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"The women are also recommending to the committee to ensure that the new constitution have children's rights embedded in it and that no gender exceeds 50% representation of elected, selected or appointed positions in government as well as giving rights to every gender to pass their citizenship to their children whether the child's other parent is a Liberian or not" (para 10)
Aug. 14, 2015, 2:56 a.m.
Countries: Bolivia
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"In general, the major achievements during the reporting period included the free registration of the birth of girls aged 0 to 11, provided for under Supreme Decree No. 0269 of 26 August 2009 regulating the free issuance of birth certificates. The number of women who were able to correct errors in their birth certificates or who succeeded in registering their births increased substantially, and the number of women able to participate in electoral processes also increased" (48). The fact that the government has programs to provide free birth registration for girls and for retroactive corrections indicates that there may be a problem with girl babies actually being registered (HLH-CODER COMMENT)more
July 2, 2015, 5:50 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR WOMEN ORGANIZES PROGRAM FOR ID CARDS & INFORMATION LINKS TO WOMEN "the National Council for Women...will target 20,000 ladies in all villages and centers of the province as a first stage...adding that the province of Minya will print the number 25 thousand Data Form national ID card for girls and women heads of households and the poor at the level of all centers of the province. Professor Marais also noted that the branch will hold a training course for 60 of the pioneers of rural women belonging to the Directorate of Social Affairs of all centers of the province at the Council's headquarters to train them on ...more
May 28, 2015, 12:46 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"No, they completely the same in law. But in the society, a baby boy will be more welcome than a baby girl. There is nothing to do with papers, but just the feelings of the parents and the family" (2)
May 16, 2015, 9:31 p.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"On January 22, 2014, the Federal National Council approved a draft federal law on the rights of the child and referred it to the government for approval. The law includes the following basic rights: The law defined the basic rights of the child, which include the right to life and safety, the right to grow up and develop, have access to care and express his views freely. They also include the right to be registered immediately after birth in the registry of births and to carry a name that does not bring contempt or insult his dignity. The child also enjoys the right to have citizenship in accordance with the ...more
April 24, 2015, 9:28 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"According to the law, birth registration is the same for boys and girls. Most are registered automatically in hospitals. Sometimes when births happen outside of hospitals (usually when the baby is a girl), the parents fail to register their child (because they might want to have a second, male, baby). Usually, when a child is not registered, he or she can lose out on education and healthcare services. Parents can sometimes apply to register an unregistered child during censuses, when there is a kind of 'amnesty' about the 1-child policy" (para 20)
April 4, 2015, 4:20 p.m.
Countries: Bahamas
Variables: CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"The law does not jeopardize birth registration based on the marital status of a Bahamian mother, however, if a Bahamian woman is married to a non-Bahamian man, the child would have to take the nationality of the father. A referendum is currently pending that would ask Bahamian voters to change this so that a child born to a Bahamian mother and non-Bahamian father can also be entitled to Bahamian citizenship. An unmarried Bahamian mother can register her child" (1). "There is no discrimination of female babies from male babies, both have equal rights. Currently the discrimination relates to nationality and not sex" (1)