The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CLCW-LAW-1

April 11, 2019, 11:47 p.m.
Countries: Cote D'Ivoire
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1, CLCC-LAW-1

"With regard to nationality, men and women are treated equally with regard to acquiring citizenship" (8).
April 10, 2019, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"The 2003 Law of Citizenship and Entry, which is renewed annually, prohibits non- Jewish Iranians, Iraqis, Syrians, Lebanese, and Palestinians from the West Bank or Gaza, including those who are spouses of Israeli residents or citizens, from obtaining resident status in Jerusalem or Israel unless the Ministry of the Interior makes a special determination, usually on humanitarian grounds. AI and other human rights organizations repeatedly called on the government to repeal this law and resume processing of family unification applications. The law allows the entry of spouses of Israelis on a 'staying permit' if the male spouse is age 35 or older and the female spouse is age 25 or...more
April 9, 2019, 12:57 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"Women may not directly transmit citizenship to their children or to noncitizen spouses" (28). "Women may not transmit citizenship to their children or to a noncitizen spouse. The government does not recognize marriages between Muslim women and non- Muslim men, irrespective of their citizenship" (34).
April 8, 2019, 10:56 a.m.
Countries: Iceland
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"A child acquires the country’s citizenship at birth if both parents are citizens, if the mother is a citizen, or if the father is a citizen and is married to the child’s foreign mother. If a mixed-nationality couple had obtained a judicial separation at the time when the child was conceived, however, the child acquires the mother’s citizenship. A stateless child can become a citizen at the age of three. In all cases a child’s access to social services depends on whether he or she has a residence permit in the country" (p. 10).
April 5, 2019, 6:49 a.m.
Countries: Bolivia
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"Citizenship is derived both through birth within the country’s territory (unless the parents have diplomatic status) and from parents" (p. 21).
April 4, 2019, 3:14 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"The law provides that an adult may become a citizen by applying for citizenship and subsequently residing legally in the country for 20 years or 10 years if married to a male citizen" (14).
March 28, 2019, 10:34 a.m.
Countries: Cuba
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"The law provides for imprisonment of up to three years or a fine of 500 nonconvertible pesos (CUP) ($20) for first-time “rafters” (those who attempted to depart clandestinely, commonly using homemade vessels). Most persons caught attempting unauthorized departures via sea were detained briefly. In the case of military or police defectors, or those traveling with children, the punishment could be more severe" (p. 18).
March 25, 2019, 2:20 p.m.
Countries: Liberia
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"Children of 'Negro' descent born in the country to at least one Liberian parent are citizens. Children born outside the country to a Liberian father are also Liberian citizens. Nevertheless, they may lose that citizenship if they do not reside in Liberia prior to age 21, or if residing abroad they do not take an oath of allegiance before a Liberian consul before age 23. Children born to non- Liberian fathers and Liberian mothers outside of the country do not derive citizenship from the mother. If a child born in the country is not of Negro descent, the child may not acquire citizenship. Non-Negro residents, such as members of the...more
March 15, 2019, 9:33 a.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: CWC-DATA-4, CLCW-LAW-1

"In December 2016 the government launched the second phase of its migrant regularization program to provide legal status to migrants in exceptional circumstances. The program, similar to the 2014 campaign, grants legal status to foreign spouses and children of citizens and other legal residents of the country, as well as individuals with at least five years of residence in the country, a valid work contract, or chronic illness. As of October, 22,986 individuals had received status under the program, of the more than 25,000 requests submitted. Migrants and refugees may obtain Moroccan nationality if they meet the legal requirements of the Nationality Law and submit a request to the Ministry...more
March 14, 2019, 3:31 p.m.
Countries: Norway
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"Foreign women may be at risk of becoming effectively stateless upon dissolution of a marriage to a Norwegian spouse if they have taken the nationality of their spouse and renounced their own and losing custody of their children if only the father has the same nationality as the children (...) The current condition for obtaining permanent residence status of three years of temporary residence may force women in abusive marriages or cohabitation to remain in such violent relations, exposing them to revictimization owing to the high threshold for proving abuse" (10-11).
March 11, 2019, 11:13 a.m.
Countries: Kazakhstan
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"In Kazakhstan women, regardless of their marital status (married or unmarried) have equal rights with men to acquire, change or retain their nationality" (23).
March 11, 2019, 7:35 a.m.
Countries: Sweden
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"Citizenship is derived from one’s parents. Children born in the country, regardless of their parents’ citizenship and status in the country, were registered immediately in the tax authority’s population register" (p. 11).
March 7, 2019, 1:47 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"The law grants citizenship at birth to: a child of a Japanese father who either is married to the child’s mother or recognizes his paternity; a child of a Japanese mother; or, a child born in the country to parents who are both unknown or are stateless" (p. 14)
March 5, 2019, 2:35 p.m.
Countries: Malaysia
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"The government does not recognize marriages between Muslims and non-Muslims and considers children born of such marriages illegitimate" (9). "Foreigners may qualify for permanent resident status after several years of marriage to a citizen: five years of marriage for foreign women married to citizen men; 10 years for foreign men married to citizen women" (17).
March 1, 2019, 11:52 p.m.
Countries: Qatar
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"Article 18 of the Act prohibits the holding of Qatari citizenship in conjunction with any other citizenship, except by decree of His Highness the Emir. Acquisition by a Qatari of the nationality of another State results in the loss of Qatari nationality" (33). "Article 10 of the Act provides that a Qatari woman does not forfeit Qatari nationality if she marries a non-Qatari unless she acquires the nationality of the husband. In such a case, she may regain Qatari nationality if she relinquishes the other nationality" (33). "A naturalized Qatari woman citizen does not lose her citizenship upon the death of her husband or in case of divorce, unless she...more
Feb. 27, 2019, 6:53 a.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1, CLCC-PRACTICE-1

"The family unification law … denies Palestinian spouses married to Israeli partner to receive the Israeli citizenship or residency rights" (para. 1).
Feb. 7, 2019, 3:47 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1, CLCC-LAW-1, IAW-LAW-1, IAD-PRACTICE-1

"In matters of child custody, inheritance, and divorce, personal status laws provide unequal treatment across the various confessional court systems but generally discriminate against women. For example, Sunni civil courts applied an inheritance law that provides a son twice the inheritance of a daughter. Religious law on child custody matters favors the father in most instances. Nationality law also discriminates against women, who may not confer citizenship to their spouses and children, although widows may confer citizenship to their minor children. By law women may own property, but they often ceded control of it to male relatives due to cultural reasons and family pressure" (Pg 29).more
Jan. 29, 2019, 2:53 p.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-1

"However, the Committee remains concerned about the persistent discrimination, under the Nationality Act, between women and men, and the denial of the right of women to acquire, change, retain and transmit their nationality. In particular, it notes the detrimental impact of the Act on Kuwaiti women married to non-Kuwaiti men, as they may not transmit their nationality to their spouses or children, who are thus precluded from political participation and have limited access to education, employment and public housing. In addition, foreign husbands of Kuwaiti women have no legal right to remain in the country without a residency permit. In contrast, foreign women married to Kuwaiti men are granted residency...more
Jan. 25, 2019, 9:57 p.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"The Committee notes with concern that the Citizenship and Entry into Israel Law (Temporary Order), which was enacted in 2003 and intended to be temporary, yet continues to be extended, prohibits the granting of status to the spouses of Palestinian Israelis or Palestinian permanent residents in Israel" (pg. 12). "Owing to the legislation, couples must choose to live separately, with one spouse deprived of seeing the children grow up; live together with the spouse from the Occupied Palestinian Territory being considered illegal, deprived of basic rights and subject to deportation if found living in East Jerusalem; or live in the West Bank, in which case the Israeli spouse risks losing...more
Jan. 5, 2019, 10:32 p.m.
Countries: Togo
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"In July 2015, the Ambassador of Togo to the United Nations informed Equality Now that a bill giving women the equal right with men to transfer their nationality to their children and spouses was being written. While this is welcome news, we are also encouraging Togo to conduct a full review of the nationality law to reaffirm that naturalized Togolese women will not lose their nationality in cases of divorce. Due to conflicting language in the law (Article 23 of the nationality law vs Article 149 of the 2012 Code of Persons and the Family), confusion remains on this point" (para 42).
Jan. 4, 2019, 10:13 p.m.
Countries: Venezuela
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"[In] Kenya, Monaco, Venezuela –Women can now pass their nationality to their foreign spouse on the same basis as men" (para 20).
Jan. 4, 2019, 10:06 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"[In] Kenya, Monaco, Venezuela –Women can now pass their nationality to their foreign spouse on the same basis as men" (para 20).
Jan. 3, 2019, 1:50 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1, MARR-PRACTICE-6

"[The President of Tunisia] has ended a decades-long ban on Tunisian Muslim women marrying non-Muslim men" (para 3). Nationality can be inferred to be muslim (CEM - CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 2, 2019, 2:04 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1, CLCC-LAW-1

"Female citizens can transmit citizenship on an equal basis with male citizens" (page 18).
Dec. 21, 2018, 4:39 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"Female citizens can transmit citizenship on an equal basis with male citizens" (page 24).
Dec. 6, 2018, 12:25 p.m.
Countries: Trinidad/Tobago
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"The Committee notes that the Citizenship of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago (Amendment) Act (2000) provides for equal rights for women and men to acquire, change or retain nationality" (page 9).
Nov. 16, 2018, 12:39 p.m.
Countries: Bhutan
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1, MARR-PRACTICE-6

"Citizens seeking to marry noncitizens require government permission. Government workers are barred from receiving promotions in the case of marriage to a noncitizen. In case such a government worker is employed in the defense or international relations sector, automatic discharge is required" (5).
Nov. 3, 2018, 10:36 a.m.
Countries: Israel
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"The Law of Citizenship and Entry, which is valid through April and renewed annually, prohibits Palestinians from the West Bank or Gaza, including those who are spouses of Israeli residents or citizens, from obtaining resident status in Jerusalem or Israel unless the Ministry of Interior makes a special determination, usually on humanitarian grounds. The law allows the entry of spouses of Israelis on a 'staying permit' if the male spouse is age 35 or older and the female spouse is age 25 or older" (para 59)
Sept. 24, 2018, 10:50 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"Single women and widows often had problems registering their children" (para 256)
Sept. 21, 2018, 5:23 p.m.
Countries: Oman
Variables: CLCW-LAW-1

"The Omani Nationality Law, which was promulgated by Royal Decree No. 38/2014, repeals the Law Regulating Omani Nationality issued by Royal Decree No. 3/83. It affirms that women and men enjoy equal rights in respect of the acquisition, retention or changing of Omani nationality. The law does not impose the nationality of an Omani women’s husband upon her, nor does it require her to become stateless...A woman’s marriage to a foreigner does not affect her nationality. She continues to retain her Omani nationality unless she decides to relinquish it in order to acquire her husband’s nationality. She is not forced to relinquish her Omani nationality if she adopts her husband’s...more