The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Sept. 15, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Robina Jalali was on the first women’s team to compete in 2004 in the Olympics for Afghanistan after the Taliban were toppled. A runner, she was one of two at the 2004 Games. Now the head of women’s sports at the National Olympic Committee, she says that even the foreign embassies are no longer paying much attention.'The main problem is the growing insecurity we have; secondly, violence against women, which is growing. Women are not feeling safe to train,' she said. 'Now we see the youth are just running away from the country, which has changed the mentality of the embassies,' she continued. 'They feel they can’t give a girl ...more
March 14, 2017, 3:23 p.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Factors such as the need to travel to unfamiliar urban areas, interact with nonindigenous male government officials, and speak Spanish inhibited some indigenous women from registering themselves and their children" (17).
March 3, 2017, 9:01 a.m.
Countries: Gabon
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-2

"Although the law does not generally distinguish between the legal status and rights of women and men, it requires a married woman to obtain her husband’s permission to receive a passport and to travel abroad" (9,16).
Feb. 10, 2017, 4:34 p.m.
Countries: Kazakhstan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"While noting the progress made by the State party in registering persons with underdetermined nationality and ensuring their access to basic services, the Committee is concerned that there still exist stateless persons, including women and girls, who continue to face difficulties in gaining access to education, health care and other services owing to the lack of identification documents and proof of residence in the State party" (7)
Jan. 26, 2017, 4:14 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Zabaleta, whose human rights centre works on gender equality issues in indigenous communities, says she has seen other improvements over the last 25 years. 'When I started, girls were sold for a piece of land or donkeys or for money,' she says. 'Things have gotten better.'" (para 14-15). It's unlikely that girls are considered full citizens if they can be sold (KH- CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DACH-PRACTICE-1, DACH-LAW-1, CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-2

"Under Saudi law, women require the permission of a male guardian to travel, marry, or exit prison and it may be needed to be granted employment or access to healthcare. A guardian is typically a woman’s father or her husband if she is married; a widow may have to seek permission from her son if she has no other men of age in her life" (para 4-5). "Saudi Arabia’s government agreed to abolish the guardianship system twice – in 2009 and 2013 – after a review by the United Nation’s Human Rights Council. It instituted some reforms by, for instance, making it easier for women to work, appointing women to ...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:43 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"A number of parties with a religious background still exist in the political arena. Those parties seem to be partners of the state for the post-June 30, which threatens the concept of citizenship and opens the way for the growth of political thoughts to discrimination against women and sectarianism" (5).
Jan. 10, 2017, 6:36 p.m.
Countries: Sierra Leone
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"The Committee notes with concern that women who give birth outside the country cannot transmit their Sierra Leonean nationality to their children, in violation of article 9 (2) of the Convention, should they have acquired another nationality. It also notes with concern that section 7 of the Citizenship Act (as amended in 2006) is facially discriminatory as it refers only to non-Sierra Leonean women married to Sierra Leonean male citizens for the purpose of naturalization, and not to non-Sierra Leonean men married to Sierra Leonean female citizens. The Committee urges the State party to ensure the equal rights of women and men to acquire, transfer, change or retain their nationality, ...more
Jan. 4, 2017, 2:59 p.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-1

“Women may not petition for citizenship for noncitizen husbands, who may apply for citizenship only after fulfilling a requirement of 15 years’ continuous residency. Once a husband has obtained citizenship, he may apply to transmit citizenship to his children. Such an application could take years, and the government could deny the application. Activists did not identify any obstacles standing in the way of naturalization for men who fulfilled this residency requirement” (23).
Jan. 3, 2017, 9:59 p.m.
Countries: Brazil
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCC-LAW-1

“Citizenship is derived from birth in the country or from a parent. According to 2010 IBGE census data, there were approximately 600,000 unregistered children under the age of 10 nationwide. Without birth certificates children cannot be vaccinated or enrolled in school. If the problem persists into adulthood, an unregistered adult cannot obtain a worker’s card or receive retirement benefits” (14, 15).
Jan. 3, 2017, 8:24 p.m.
Countries: Italy
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, LO-LAW-1, IAW-LAW-1, IAD-LAW-1

“Women have the same legal status and rights as men, including rights under family, labor, property, nationality, and inheritance laws. In many cases victims of discrimination were unwilling to request the forms of protections provided by employment laws or collective contracts” (14).
Nov. 17, 2016, 4:20 p.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Under article 12 of the Law on Republic of Uzbekistan Citizenship, citizenship is acquired by women and men in the same ways: by birth; as a result of conferment of citizenship; on grounds stipulated by treaties to which the Republic of Uzbekistan is a party; and on other grounds stipulated by the Law on Republic of Uzbekistan Citizenship" (28). "Article 19 of the law specifies grounds common to women and men for the termination of Republic of Uzbekistan citizenship: as a result of renunciation of Republic of Uzbekistan citizenship and as a result of loss of Republic of Uzbekistan citizenship" (28). "In no way does domicile registration in the Republic ...more
Sept. 13, 2016, 5:32 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-2, LO-LAW-1, IIP-LAW-1

“I believe that this idea [misyar] has become embedded in Saudi society, which sees women as a shame that cannot be avoided except by marriage or death. This mindset will remain as long as the country’s laws support it. Woman will not be able to approach any government department without a male guardian, cannot travel abroad without his permission, cannot apply for a passport without him, cannot rent a house except in his name. I can give a long list” (para 8).
Sept. 12, 2016, 8:57 a.m.
Countries: Jordan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCC-LAW-1

"In Jordan, because married mothers are unable to convey citizenship to their children or spouses, children with Jordanian mothers and foreign fathers cannot obtain free public health care or education. As they grow older, it is difficult for them to obtain driver’s licenses and work permit. Public school can cost up to 12 times more for noncitizens, and a one-year work permit for a foreign spouse or child can cost up to 5% of income per capita...In recognition of the challenges such families face, as of January 2015 children of Jordanian mothers and non-Jordanian fathers can apply for a special identification card that allows them to obtain such subsidized government ...more
Sept. 11, 2016, 8 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Benin, Cameroon, Egypt, Mauritius, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Senegal
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

According to Table 1.2, married women cannot obtain a national identity card in the same way as married men (9).
Sept. 11, 2016, 7:55 p.m.
Countries: Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

According to Table 1.2, married women cannot travel outside the country in the same way as married men (9).
Aug. 29, 2016, 10:29 a.m.
Countries: Zimbabwe
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as a man. As well, women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (246).
Aug. 29, 2016, 10:26 a.m.
Countries: Zambia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as a man. As well, women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (244).
Aug. 29, 2016, 10:25 a.m.
Countries: Yemen
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Unmarried women can apply for a passport in the same way as men but married women cannot. All women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (244).
Aug. 29, 2016, 10:23 a.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

In West Bank and Gaza, women can apply for a passport in the same way as a man. As well, women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (242).
Aug. 21, 2016, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as a man. As well, women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (242).
Aug. 21, 2016, 11:18 a.m.
Countries: Venezuela
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as a man. As well, women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (240).
Aug. 21, 2016, 11:16 a.m.
Countries: Uzbekistan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-2

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as men. As well, women can travel outside the country in the same way as men (240).
Aug. 21, 2016, 11:14 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-2

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as men. As well, women can travel outside the country in the same way as men (238).
Aug. 21, 2016, 11:12 a.m.
Countries: Uruguay
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as a man. As well, women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (238).
Aug. 21, 2016, 11:10 a.m.
Countries: Ukraine
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as a man. As well, women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (234).
Aug. 21, 2016, 11:06 a.m.
Countries: United Kingdom
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-2

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as men. As well, women can travel outside the country in the same way as men (236).
Aug. 21, 2016, 11:05 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Unmarried women can apply for a passport in the same way as men but married women cannot. All women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (234).
Aug. 21, 2016, 11 a.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Unmarried women can apply for a passport in the same way as men but married women cannot. All women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (236).
Aug. 21, 2016, 10:50 a.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Women can apply for a passport in the same way as a man. As well, women can apply for a national ID card and travel outside the country in the same way as a man (232).