The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CLCW-PRACTICE-1

Feb. 22, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Countries: Barbados
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Barbados can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (65).
Feb. 22, 2019, 10:43 a.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Bangladesh can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (65).
Feb. 22, 2019, 10:18 a.m.
Countries: Bahrain
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Bahrain can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (64).
Feb. 22, 2019, 10 a.m.
Countries: Bahamas
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

A woman in the Bahamas can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (64).
Feb. 22, 2019, 9:44 a.m.
Countries: Azerbaijan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Azerbaijan can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (63).
Feb. 22, 2019, 9:27 a.m.
Countries: Austria
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

A woman in Austria can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (63).
Feb. 21, 2019, 2:56 p.m.
Countries: Armenia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

According to the table, a woman in Armenia can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (62).
Feb. 21, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Argentina
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

According to the table, a woman in Argentina can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (61).
Feb. 21, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Angola
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

According to the table, a woman in Angola can legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (60).
Feb. 21, 2019, 2:55 p.m.
Countries: Algeria
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

According to the table, a woman in Algeria cannot legally apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (60).
Feb. 21, 2019, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: Albania
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

According to the table, women in Albania are legally able to apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (59).
Feb. 21, 2019, 2:54 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

According to the table, women cannot apply for a national ID card in the same way as a man (59).
Jan. 29, 2019, 2:53 p.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-1

"However, the Committee remains concerned about the persistent discrimination, under the Nationality Act, between women and men, and the denial of the right of women to acquire, change, retain and transmit their nationality. In particular, it notes the detrimental impact of the Act on Kuwaiti women married to non-Kuwaiti men, as they may not transmit their nationality to their spouses or children, who are thus precluded from political participation and have limited access to education, employment and public housing. In addition, foreign husbands of Kuwaiti women have no legal right to remain in the country without a residency permit. In contrast, foreign women married to Kuwaiti men are granted residency...more
Jan. 3, 2019, 1:23 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-2, MARR-PRACTICE-1, MARR-LAW-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"[Saudi Arabia] also has a law stating that all women must have a male guardian, typically a husband, father or brother, who gives them permission to study, travel abroad or marry" (para 9).
Dec. 21, 2018, 4:39 p.m.
Countries: Tunisia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Female citizens can transmit citizenship on an equal basis with male citizens, and there is no discrimination between a mother and father regarding passport application and authorization to leave the country" (page 24).
Nov. 16, 2018, 12:39 p.m.
Countries: Bhutan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Civil society groups noted disproportionate barriers to citizenship faced by Lhotshampa communities and the wives of non-Bhutanese citizens" (8).
Nov. 16, 2018, 9:51 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Shan: A Shan woman who was a single mother of two has her own job supporting herself and her children. Around 2011-2012, she went to get a new ID card at an immigration office in Southern Shan State. She also applied for a new house registration for her family. Rationally, she should be named the head of household since she has no husband. However, the immigration officer did not let her name use as a head of household, but put her father’s name instead and registered her as “dependent”. Source: Burmese Women's Union (BWU). Lahu: A Lahu woman in her late 30s was separated from her husband when her son...more
Nov. 16, 2018, 9:51 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Shan: A Shan woman who was a single mother of two has her own job supporting herself and her children. Around 2011-2012, she went to get a new ID card at an immigration office in Southern Shan State. She also applied for a new house registration for her family. Rationally, she should be named the head of household since she has no husband. However, the immigration officer did not let her name use as a head of household, but put her father’s name instead and registered her as “dependent”. Source: Burmese Women's Union (BWU). Lahu: A Lahu woman in her late 30s was separated from her husband when her son...more
Nov. 16, 2018, 9:46 a.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Other policies and practices allow only men to be considered head of household for purposes of land registration in certain parts of Burma and the Government has done nothing to ensure a woman’s right to serve as head of household" (page 4). "On Government-issued identification cards, women are listed as “dependent” even if they are employed and have their own careers and identification cards for children must bear the signature of the father not the mother. This also holds true in IDP camps, where residents must list a father’s not mother’s name on all documents. Customary practice also favors listing men only as head of household at immigration and other...more
Oct. 26, 2018, 8:42 a.m.
Countries: Senegal
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CUST-LAW-1

"The family code’s definition of paternal rights also remained an obstacle to equality between men and women. The code considers men to be heads of household, preventing women from taking legal responsibility for their children. In addition, any childhood benefits are paid to the father. Women can become the legal head of household only if the husband formally renounces his authority before authorities or if he is unable to act as head of household" (page 16).
Oct. 24, 2018, 8:49 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Violence against women is a societal problem and a public health issue. Under-reporting is a result of lack of mechanisms in place to help protect and assist victims to become independent. Women that do take their cases to the court are mostly abandoned by their families. In such cases, they have little to no funds to support themselves, and also fight in court to get justice" (para. 8).
Oct. 22, 2018, 9:31 p.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Married women were not allowed to travel outside the country without prior permission from their husbands. For example, authorities initially prohibited Niloufar Ardalan, captain of the country’s national indoor women’s futsal team, from traveling to a tournament in Malaysia in September because her husband refused to grant her permission. After filing an appeal, a court granted her a one-time-use exit visa" (para 111). "The law states that a virgin woman or girl wishing to wed needs the consent of her father or grandfather or the court’s permission, even if she is over the age of 18" (para 155)
Oct. 19, 2018, 7:59 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"The same law also designates the man as the head of the household" (para 152)
Oct. 17, 2018, 1:08 p.m.
Countries: Palestine
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"In another key reform on March 5, Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah announced the cabinet’s decision to allow women who have custody of their children, to open bank accounts for them, transfer their children to different schools, and apply for their passports" (para 11). "A woman also needs the father’s permission to travel abroad with her child. Both family laws also discriminate against women in marriage, divorce, and inheritance" (para 13).
Sept. 26, 2018, 11:01 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Afghan women are often unable to obtain basic legal documents such as national IDs and marriage certificates, which makes it difficult to seek help from the courts when they are in trouble, says Marion Guillaume of the Samuel Hall think-tank" (para 1). "Lack of access to civil documentation such as tazkera (national IDs) and marriage certificates is a major, but hidden, reason for difficulties in gaining access to justice... And to obtain tazkera following general procedures, both men and women must present a copy of the tazkera of one of their male relatives. Therefore, women are dependent on the willingness of their male relatives to help them. Women without close...more
Sept. 24, 2018, 10:50 p.m.
Countries: Iraq
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Women could not obtain the Civil Status Identification Document--required for access to public services, food assistance, health care, employment, education, and housing--without consent of a male relative. This restriction affected women in conflict, according to local NGOs. OWFI and local media reported authorities told a female minor, whose entire family was killed, that she could not obtain identity documents without a male relative until she turned 18 years old. As a result she could not attend school or access social and public services" (para 254)
Sept. 12, 2018, 9:50 p.m.
Countries: Eritrea
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Categories of persons most commonly denied exit visas included men under age 54, regardless of whether they had completed the military portion of national service, and women younger than 30, unless they had children" (para 76)
Sept. 5, 2018, 10:25 a.m.
Countries: Australia
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, LO-LAW-1, IAW-LAW-1, AFE-LAW-1

"The law provided for the same legal status and rights for women as for men, including under laws related to family, labor, property, nationality, and inheritance, as well as employment, credit, pay, owning and/or managing businesses, education, and housing" (15).
Sept. 5, 2018, 10:23 a.m.
Countries: Costa Rica
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1, CLCW-LAW-1

"As indicated in previous reports of Costa Rica, Costa Rican women enjoy the same rights as men to acquire, change or retain their nationality" (23).
Sept. 5, 2018, 9:54 a.m.
Countries: United Arab Emirates
Variables: CLCW-PRACTICE-1

"Custom dictates that a husband may prevent his wife, minor children, and adult unmarried daughters from leaving the country by taking custody of their passports" (16).