The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for CWC-DATA-4

Jan. 6, 2018, 8:12 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

Sara's mother was from Egypt and her father was from Morocco. She was born and raised in Kuwait. She moved to Cairo for a year and now lives in New York (ENB-Coder Comment)
Jan. 6, 2018, 8:11 p.m.
Countries: Kuwait
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

Sara's mom is from Egypt, her dad is from Morocco, and she was raised in Kuwait. She lived and worked in Egypt for a year and now lives in New York (ENB-Coder Comment)
Jan. 6, 2018, 8:09 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

Sara's mom is from Egypt, her dad is from Morocco, and she was raised in Kuwait. She lived and worked in Egypt for a year to teach at a university and now lives in New York (ENB-Coder Comment)."Since the 1970s, women's veils started to become familiar in Egypt, 'primarily due to strong religious rhetoric, and mass migration to Gulf countries that resulted in some of their traditions being brought back home'"(5). This statement was made by Samia Kadri, a sociology professor (ENB-Coder Comment)."'EIPR observed cases where veiled Syrian women were physically attacked, insulted and kicked out of public microbuses because people recognised their nationality through their distinct hijab'"(5). This statement ...more
Jan. 6, 2018, 8:06 p.m.
Countries: Syria
Variables: CWC-DATA-3, CWC-DATA-4, IIP-PRACTICE-2

"'EIPR observed cases where veiled Syrian women were physically attacked, insulted and kicked out of public microbuses because people recognised their nationality through their distinct hijab'"(5). This statement was made by Dali Abd El-Hameed (ENB-Coder Comment). "Many people who oppose ousted president Morsi believe Syrians in Egypt, who are in the many thousands thanks to the civil war in Syria, were supporting him and opposed his toppling"(5)
Dec. 26, 2017, 11:01 p.m.
Countries: Nicaragua
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-4, IRP-PRACTICE-1, IRP-PRACTICE-2, IRP-DATA-2, SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"There were anecdotal reports that [in Panama] Chinese citizens were forced to work in grocery stores and laundries in situations of debt bondage, as well as reports that Nicaraguan and Colombian women were subjected to domestic servitude. According to leaders of the Central General Autonomy for Workers, forced labor continued to be a growing problem, particularly in the commercial sex industry"(29-30)
Dec. 26, 2017, 11:01 p.m.
Countries: Colombia
Variables: TRAFF-PRACTICE-1, TRAFF-PRACTICE-2, TRAFF-DATA-1, LDS-PRACTICE-1, LDS-PRACTICE-2, LDS-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-4, IRP-PRACTICE-1, IRP-PRACTICE-2, IRP-DATA-2, SEGI-PRACTICE-1

"There were anecdotal reports that [in Panama] Chinese citizens were forced to work in grocery stores and laundries in situations of debt bondage, as well as reports that Nicaraguan and Colombian women were subjected to domestic servitude. According to leaders of the Central General Autonomy for Workers, forced labor continued to be a growing problem, particularly in the commercial sex industry"(29-30)
Dec. 26, 2017, 10:52 p.m.
Countries: Panama
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"The law provides for freedom of internal movement, foreign travel, emigration, and repatriation, and the government generally respected these rights, except for some instances of internal movement in Darien province"(10)."Many indigenous laborers migrated seasonally from the country to Costa Rica, and both governments were concerned about public health risks associated with these movements. The Ministry of Health established centers for primary health care near the border crossings for vaccinations and regular health exams for this migrant population"(24). "The law prohibits all forms of forced labor of adults or children. The law establishes penalties of 15 to 20 years’ imprisonment for forced labor involving movement (either cross-border or within the country) ...more
Dec. 14, 2017, 8:03 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

At 2:03 Brishti explains that when the river took away her family's house her father came to Dhaka and sent her to work when she was 3 or 4 years old (ENB-Coder Comment).At 2:31 of the video text on the screen says "The population of 20 million is growing at a rate of 5% a year. As climate change intensifies flooding, more and more Bangladeshis are migrating from villages into Dhaka in search or work. 10 million new migrants are expected by 2040 due to climate change"(ENB-Coder Comment).At 14:31 text on the screen says "Riverbank erosion is thought to displace between 50,000 and 200,000 people in Bangladesh each year. Increased ...more
Dec. 13, 2017, 10:58 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"A survey of 10,000 households in this northern state found more than 9,000 married women had come from other states" (para 9).
Dec. 2, 2017, 3:53 p.m.
Countries: Germany
Variables: CWC-DATA-3, CWC-DATA-4

"The proposed [burqa] ban comes as German Chancellor Angela Merkel's government attempts to address public fears surrounding last year's record influx of nearly 1.1 million migrants and refugees, most from predominantly Muslim countries" (para 6).
Dec. 2, 2017, 3:04 p.m.
Countries: Germany
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"There has been increased concern over polygamous marriages in the wake of a rise in the number of migrants arriving in Germany, many from Muslim countries" (para 3). "While polygamy is already banned in Germany, many officials 'turn a blind eye' to migrants who arrive in the country with more than one wife, the newspaper reports. This is also true of forced and underage marriages" (para 4-5).
Nov. 30, 2017, 12:02 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"In the PRC, women account for between 60% and 70% of all farm labor, in large part due to migratory patterns in which men, more frequently than women, seek employment outside agriculture (de Brauw et al. 2012)"(25)
Nov. 30, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Countries: Cambodia
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"In spite of these measures [emergency food assistance], cross-border migration had increased"(56)
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:29 p.m.
Countries: Malaysia
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"In countries such as Malaysia and Sri Lanka, young women in particular out-migrate to urban centers to work at transnational production sites or free trade zones. Well-documented tensions are often created between the traditional values of the peasant society from which the women originate and the values at industrial sites where they work (Ong 1987)"(22)."Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia)"(22)
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:29 p.m.
Countries: Thailand
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia)"(22)
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:29 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Women who are left behind sometimes must shoulder debts incurred to support the migration of men, in addition to coping with and managing household production activities. This may cause women to abandon household production and take up waged labor in their vicinity, as has been seen in Nepal (personal communication, 2013)"(22)
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:29 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"In countries such as Malaysia and Sri Lanka, young women in particular out-migrate to urban centers to work at transnational production sites or free trade zones. Well-documented tensions are often created between the traditional values of the peasant society from which the women originate and the values at industrial sites where they work (Ong 1987)"(22)."Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999). ...more
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:29 p.m.
Countries: Philippines
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999). Female migrants formed threequarters of those migrating from Sri Lanka, and over half of those migrating from the Philippines in recent years (United Nations Research Institute for Social Development [UNRISD] 2005). They often become part of heavily segmented employment markets (Salazar Parrenas 2001)"(22-23)
Nov. 29, 2017, 10:29 p.m.
Countries: Cambodia, China
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Young women from Cambodia, the PRC, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka, as well as other countries in Asia and the Pacific, increasingly migrate to other countries (particularly in the Middle East) to serve as domestic workers, or sometimes as sex workers (especially in Thailand and Malaysia) (Adams and Dickey 1999; Brochmann 1993; Henshall 1999; Mason 1999)"(22)
Nov. 29, 2017, 1:38 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Factors motivating women’s work participation include local work availability, reduction in risks associated with migration"(55)
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"ROK government and media reports noted that the DPRK also kidnapped other foreign nationals from locations abroad in the 1970s and 1980s. The DPRK continued to deny its involvement in the kidnappings. The ROK Ministry of Unification reported that an estimated 517 of its civilians, abducted or detained by DPRK authorities since the end of the Korean War, remained in the DPRK. South Korean NGOs estimated that during the Korean War the DPRK abducted 20,000 civilians who remained in the North or who have died"(2)
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"After bilateral talks between the DPRK and Japan in May 2014, the DPRK agreed to reopen the investigation into the whereabouts of 12 Japanese citizens believed to have been abducted by the DPRK. The DPRK suspended bilateral negotiations on the abductions issue in April, citing Japan’s move to raise the issue in a UN Human Rights Council resolution. In September the DPRK announced it had completed its reinvestigation and had no new information to report"(2)
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: Algeria, Angola, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, United Arab Emirates
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor. NGO reports indicated the laborers were managed by the government as a matter of state policy and were under constant and close surveillance by DPRK security agents. Laborers worked between 12 and 16 hours ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:14 p.m.
Countries: China, Russia
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"There were an estimated 50,000 to 60,000 North Korean citizens working as overseas laborers, primarily in Russia and China. The UN Special Rapporteur on the DPRK noted that, while most were sent to Russia and China to work, they were also reportedly found in Algeria, Angola, Cambodia, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Oman, Poland, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. Numerous NGOs noted that these citizens were in conditions of forced labor. NGO reports indicated the laborers were managed by the government as a matter of state policy and were under constant and close surveillance by DPRK security agents. Laborers worked between 12 and 16 hours ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"There were reports of female victims of trafficking among refugees and workers crossing the border [from North Korea] into China"(1)."According to the Hidden Gulag IV report, since late 2008, Jongo-ri (Camp 12) in North Hamkyung Province was expanded to include a women’s annex. Camp 12’s women’s annex holds approximately 1,000 women, most of whom were imprisoned after being repatriated from China. The existence of this women’s annex was corroborated by satellite imagery and defector testimony. Defector testimony cited food rations below subsistence levels, forced labor, and high rates of death due to starvation at Camp 12"(3)."The government [of North Korea] did not allow emigration, and reports stated that it continued ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 1:02 p.m.
Countries: North Korea
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"There were reports of female victims of trafficking among refugees and workers crossing the border into China"(1)."Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and press reports indicated that border guards had orders to shoot to kill individuals leaving the country without permission"(1)."After bilateral talks between the DPRK and Japan in May 2014, the DPRK agreed to reopen the investigation into the whereabouts of 12 Japanese citizens believed to have been abducted by the DPRK"(2)."ROK government and media reports noted that the DPRK also kidnapped other foreign nationals from locations abroad in the 1970s and 1980s. The DPRK continued to deny its involvement in the kidnappings. The ROK Ministry of Unification reported that an estimated ...more
Nov. 7, 2017, 11:01 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: LDS-DATA-1, CWC-DATA-4

"Conservative traditions once meant it was not acceptable for Tajik women to work to earn a living, but the situation has changed. Huge numbers of Tajik men travel to Russia as labour migrants each year, leaving many jobs to be filled by women [in Tajikistan]"(para 4)
Nov. 7, 2017, 11 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Conservative traditions once meant it was not acceptable for Tajik women to work to earn a living, but the situation has changed. Huge numbers of Tajik men travel to Russia as labour migrants each year, leaving many jobs to be filled by women"(para 4)
Nov. 7, 2017, 9:21 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Climate change is making an already tough life even harder for many of the estimated 20 million people now crammed into heaving greater Dhaka. Its population continues to grow at nearly 5 percent a year as migrants - many of whom have lost their farms to worsening erosion, storms and sea-level rise - flood in seeking new work.'If we told them to go back, where would they go?' asked Sirajul Islam, chief urban planner for the Dhaka South City Corporation, which manages the southern half of Dhaka"(para 5-6)
Oct. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: CWC-DATA-4

"Some Nubian women have left their region's villages to make their own way, either by completing their studies or seeking out new job opportunities, and have succeeded in integrating into the world outside their societies. Others remain constrained by Nubia's traditional mores and customs. Still others have gradually moved away from those traditions"(para 1)."Regarding the change taking place in the acceptance of women leaving Nubia, she [Asma Mahmoud] said, 'Few Nubians accept the idea of a woman studying or working outside of her environment, though it's commonplace to live abroad with one's husband or first-degree relative'"(para 5)