The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for DLB-DATA-1

Nov. 10, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea, and 182% of the total tax revenue of India"(3-4)."A major cause of the persistence of existing gender roles is that many men ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"A study on the Indian state of Gujarat estimated that reducing to 1 hour a day the time spent fetching water by women would allow the women to increase their incomes by $100 yearly using the time saved (United Nations Development Programme [UNDP] 2006)"(3)."It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were ...more
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: China
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"In the absence of redistribution of existing gender roles, gains for women that should result from investments in physical infrastructure, for example, may be short-lived, or benefit them less than men. After one village in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) was electrified, it was found that the main effect was to lead women to shift their domestic responsibilities to the evening, resulting in them working longer hours in the field. Leisure time increased for the village as a whole, but men were the primary beneficiaries (FAO, IFAD, and ILO 2010, p. 40, referring to Lucas et al. 2003)"(4)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: Sri Lanka
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Most rural households and communities in the region manage their agricultural production systems based on social norms and practices that determine the gender division of labor. These vary from the notably constrained roles and opportunities of women in South Asia (with the exception of Sri Lanka) to the more complementary gender roles found in parts of Southeast Asia and some of the Pacific island nations"(8)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: Indonesia, Pakistan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"A major cause of the persistence of existing gender roles is that many men in the formal sector work long hours, providing at least a partial explanation of why they are not assuming a greater share of family responsibilities. In countries such as Indonesia, Republic of Korea, and Pakistan, more than 30% of all employees work more than 48 hours per week. Male employees especially tend to work excessive hours—both a consequence and cause of gender stereotypes reinforcing the existing division of labor (Lee, McCann, and Messenger 2007, p. 240)"(6)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: South Africa
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions"(3)
Nov. 10, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"It has been estimated that in middle-income countries such as the Republic of Korea and South Africa, unpaid care work represents the equivalent of 15% of gross domestic product (GDP) if it were valued in monetary terms (as when such services are subject to market transactions). The comparable figure is 63% for low-income countries such as India and Tanzania (Budlender 2010). If this unpaid care work were to be financed by the public purse, it would represent 94% of the total tax revenue of the Republic of Korea, and 182% of the total tax revenue of India"(3-4)
Nov. 7, 2017, 11 p.m.
Countries: Tajikistan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The workday begins at half past three in the morning, when they start sweeping the streets with handmade brooms. Later in the day, women in orange hi-vis vests can be seen digging the earth, planting shrubs and tending roadside flowers...Street cleaners are now mostly female, although there are a few men who join their ranks, either very young or elderly. The salary is small, but it makes a difference to the family budget"(para 3, 5)
Nov. 7, 2017, 9:21 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, MARR-PRACTICE-7

"Two months ago, she [Shaheen, a Village Education Resource Centre community coordinator] stopped by the home of a local widow, to find out if her 14-year-old daughter Jasmine, who had been forced to leave school as money was short, was interested in some training to become a garment factory worker.Many slum residents find work at Dhaka's garment factories, earning about $50 per month of 12-hour shifts, or spend their days recycling plastic wrapping in sheds within the slum.Jasmine's mother said the training wasn't necessary, as she planned to send her daughter back to their native village to marry.Shaheen contacted members of a women's group, who visited to urge Jasmine's mother ...more
Oct. 31, 2017, 2:11 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"A survey by the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry suggests that a quarter of women in India don’t return to work after having their babies"(para 12)
Oct. 30, 2017, 6:39 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-1

"She [Asma Mahmoud] stressed that 'there is a sharp distinction between men and women; it's incumbent on Nubian women to be at their fathers’, brothers’ or husbands’ beck and call all the time'"(para 5)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"When their husbands die many widows are left destitute. If they remain with their in-laws they may be confined to the house and treated like servants, activists say"(para 15)
Oct. 26, 2017, 11:20 a.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Women carried a special burden on their shoulders during the republic’s two wars. Men fought on both sides, and for those who didn’t, it was dangerous to move through the republic’s numerous checkpoints. They could be arrested, abducted, tortured or killed. Women became the main breadwinners, took care of children, cleared away debris and repaired damaged houses. They negotiated with the military, and when men were abducted by security services they blocked roads, protested, spent days in official institutions trying to establish their whereabouts, and searched through mass graves"(para 12)."Many Chechen women remain family breadwinners and still have to do all the housework, but since the war their social status ...more
Oct. 16, 2017, 5:08 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The recent phenomena of ikumen gives hope that society is recognizing the need for men to take on a more active role in the home and to help with childrearing activities; however, statistics have shown women continue to do five times as much housework as men. In 2014, the OECD surveys found Japanese men to be the most unhelpful in the world" (5).
Sept. 26, 2017, 2 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2

"The first episode addressed the importance of time management and prioritization in particular in house management. It also stressed the importance of the participatory approach in life and family management through the division of home responsibilities among all the family members for making a successful family life based on participation. To listen the first episode, please visit https://soundcloud.com/user-160861507/y5rcws60lylw - Kindly note, the episodes are in Arabic"(para 4)
Aug. 28, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The ratio of men and women in the labor force in the Solomon Islands has remained relatively stagnant over the past decade, largely a product of gender inequalities in education, training, household responsibilities, and cultural attitudes about the role of women"(para 3)."One factor that could significantly impact GDP is the restructuring of the division of labor in the country’s unpaid care economy. According to the Asian Development Bank, 'women spend twice as much time on household work and four times more on childcare' – neither of which is accounted for in the calculation of GDP. Likewise, women’s overrepresentation in subsistence work inhibits their ability to contribute significantly to GDP"(para 5)more
Aug. 26, 2017, 11:31 a.m.
Countries: Rwanda
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

“To be a rural Rwandan woman is difficult. First of all, you go to cultivate land early in the day and return home only late, carrying produce in a basket on your head with a baby on your back, a hoe in one hand, and a rope attached to your goat in the other. It is beyond the imagination” (1). Jacqueline Murekatete says this from 0:17-0:34 (MM - CODER COMMENT).
Aug. 11, 2017, 10:32 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Today is the 12th of baby born. I stayed at health institution for first 24 hours of birth. I returned to home when doctor said that the health of mother and baby is fine. I am living in this shed since I came to home. We all live in shed while having babies. The god will get angry while we go to kitchen and other areas of house"(para 7)."'Today is the 13th day of birth of my daughter. I went to field to harvest rice paddy by making sleep my daughter at shed. Now, 11 am, I give this grass to buffalo and will eat myself then I will feed ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:55 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, DMW-PRACTICE-1

At 0:23 the son says his mother takes care of the children as well as the household (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:04 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"TBILISI, Georgia – The camera zooms in, panning across a marble mantle covered with family photos of three young boys and their happy, smiling parents, then stops on what studies have shown is a statistically uncommon sight in Georgia: A father – in this case Zviad Kvaratskhelia, best-selling author and publisher – sitting in his living room, spending the day alone with his kids – Nikoloz, age 5, Demetre, 3, and Alexandre, 1"(para 1)."'I had never spent time alone with my kids before. They found it bizarre at first to see me changing diapers and cooking for them,' says Zviad. 'But we mustn’t take our families for granted. We must ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 5:34 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, DMW-PRACTICE-1

"In every field my parents are different from others. Some people think that girls should not play and that they are meant merely to carry out kitchen duties". This statement was made at 1:38 by a 14 year old girl Saima (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 8, 2017, 5:51 p.m.
Countries: Belgium, Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The education of mothers or parents has also been linked to their children eating more nutritious and diverse diets: see, for example, Khanal et al. (2013) on Nepalese infants or Vereecken et al. (2004) on Flemish preschoolers"(59). This could possibly be due to mothers doing the meal preparation (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 8, 2017, 5:49 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Public campaigns and education, including the large-scale training of women in the preparation of traditional low-fat, high-vegetable meals, has led to Korean diets that resulted in the consumption of more of these meals than might be predicted, given the country’s relatively high average incomes"(14). As the campaign focused on women, it is probable that women are usually primarily responsible for meal preparation (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 7, 2017, 4:50 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Since 2013, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has made increasing women’s labor force participation a core component of his economic growth plan. Known as 'womenomics,' research has suggested that this strategy could boost Japan’s GDP by 15 percent and help expand the country’s shrinking labor force. However, skeptics of Abe’s womenomics agenda have argued that women’s economic potential cannot be realized by policy changes alone. They contend that a transformation in cultural attitudes toward women must occur as well. According to one critic, for example, Japan’s 'gendered status quo' continues to 'allocate productive roles to men and reproductive roles to women.' Consequently, despite having one of the most liberal paid parental ...more
Aug. 3, 2017, 4:09 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"'We admit girls who have complete nine years of [primary] schooling. So they get a special education here. We teach them religion, tailoring, and cooking skills'" (1). This is a quote from the executive secretary of a boarding school designed to prepare girls to marry Muslim men at :14 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

Figure 3.7 shows average time spent on paid work, housework, and child care, by both mothers and fathers, comparing 1975 and 2011. In 1975, mothers spent 14.6 hours doing paid work, 23.6 hours doing housework, and 8.6 hours doing child care per week. In 2011, mothers spent 21.4 hours doing paid work, 17.8 hours doing housework, and 13.5 hours doing child care per week. In 1975, fathers spent 41.4 hours doing paid work, 6.0 hours doing housework, and 2.6 hours doing child care per week. In 2011, fathers spent 37.1 hours doing paid work, 9.8 hours doing housework, and 7.3 hours doing child care per week (103)more
April 1, 2017, 11:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The underground water is often over thirty meters deep. Traditionally it is the women who draw the water with their bare hands. Each day, they fetch tens of liters needed for their household. It is back breaking work. On the other hand, men are responsible for collecting water for the livestock. The donkeys used to carry out this work belong to them exclusively" (1) .
Feb. 17, 2017, 11:49 a.m.
Countries: Ecuador
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"In March the Inter-American Development Bank reported the average income of women was 14 percent lower than that of men, although other studies indicated that women represented 55.5 percent of the university population and worked an average of 17 hours more per week" (44).
Feb. 9, 2017, 4:56 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Evidence from the Young Lives project in Ethiopia suggests that 52% of rural girls between five and eight years old are engaged in care work compared to 38% of rural boys - and that one-quarter of these young girls spend three or more hours daily on unpaid care" (para 7).
Feb. 1, 2017, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"In 2012, the last time the government surveyed its citizens about their occupation, an astonishing 205 million women between the ages of 15 and 60 responded 'attending to domestic duties'” (para 4). This indicates a rigid gender division of labor in this society (KH- CODER COMMENT).