The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for DLB-DATA-1

Aug. 28, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"The ratio of men and women in the labor force in the Solomon Islands has remained relatively stagnant over the past decade, largely a product of gender inequalities in education, training, household responsibilities, and cultural attitudes about the role of women"(para 3)."One factor that could significantly impact GDP is the restructuring of the division of labor in the country’s unpaid care economy. According to the Asian Development Bank, 'women spend twice as much time on household work and four times more on childcare' – neither of which is accounted for in the calculation of GDP. Likewise, women’s overrepresentation in subsistence work inhibits their ability to contribute significantly to GDP"(para 5)more
Aug. 26, 2017, 11:31 a.m.
Countries: Rwanda
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

“To be a rural Rwandan woman is difficult. First of all, you go to cultivate land early in the day and return home only late, carrying produce in a basket on your head with a baby on your back, a hoe in one hand, and a rope attached to your goat in the other. It is beyond the imagination” (1). Jacqueline Murekatete says this from 0:17-0:34 (MM - CODER COMMENT).
Aug. 11, 2017, 10:32 a.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Today is the 12th of baby born. I stayed at health institution for first 24 hours of birth. I returned to home when doctor said that the health of mother and baby is fine. I am living in this shed since I came to home. We all live in shed while having babies. The god will get angry while we go to kitchen and other areas of house"(para 7)."'Today is the 13th day of birth of my daughter. I went to field to harvest rice paddy by making sleep my daughter at shed. Now, 11 am, I give this grass to buffalo and will eat myself then I will feed ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:55 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, DMW-PRACTICE-1

At 0:23 the son says his mother takes care of the children as well as the household (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:04 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"TBILISI, Georgia – The camera zooms in, panning across a marble mantle covered with family photos of three young boys and their happy, smiling parents, then stops on what studies have shown is a statistically uncommon sight in Georgia: A father – in this case Zviad Kvaratskhelia, best-selling author and publisher – sitting in his living room, spending the day alone with his kids – Nikoloz, age 5, Demetre, 3, and Alexandre, 1"(para 1)."'I had never spent time alone with my kids before. They found it bizarre at first to see me changing diapers and cooking for them,' says Zviad. 'But we mustn’t take our families for granted. We must ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 5:34 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, DMW-PRACTICE-1

"In every field my parents are different from others. Some people think that girls should not play and that they are meant merely to carry out kitchen duties". This statement was made at 1:38 by a 14 year old girl Saima (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 8, 2017, 5:51 p.m.
Countries: Belgium, Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The education of mothers or parents has also been linked to their children eating more nutritious and diverse diets: see, for example, Khanal et al. (2013) on Nepalese infants or Vereecken et al. (2004) on Flemish preschoolers"(59). This could possibly be due to mothers doing the meal preparation (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 8, 2017, 5:49 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Public campaigns and education, including the large-scale training of women in the preparation of traditional low-fat, high-vegetable meals, has led to Korean diets that resulted in the consumption of more of these meals than might be predicted, given the country’s relatively high average incomes"(14). As the campaign focused on women, it is probable that women are usually primarily responsible for meal preparation (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 7, 2017, 4:50 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Since 2013, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has made increasing women’s labor force participation a core component of his economic growth plan. Known as 'womenomics,' research has suggested that this strategy could boost Japan’s GDP by 15 percent and help expand the country’s shrinking labor force. However, skeptics of Abe’s womenomics agenda have argued that women’s economic potential cannot be realized by policy changes alone. They contend that a transformation in cultural attitudes toward women must occur as well. According to one critic, for example, Japan’s 'gendered status quo' continues to 'allocate productive roles to men and reproductive roles to women.' Consequently, despite having one of the most liberal paid parental ...more
Aug. 3, 2017, 4:09 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"'We admit girls who have complete nine years of [primary] schooling. So they get a special education here. We teach them religion, tailoring, and cooking skills'" (1). This is a quote from the executive secretary of a boarding school designed to prepare girls to marry Muslim men at :14 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT).
June 28, 2017, 11:15 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

Figure 3.7 shows average time spent on paid work, housework, and child care, by both mothers and fathers, comparing 1975 and 2011. In 1975, mothers spent 14.6 hours doing paid work, 23.6 hours doing housework, and 8.6 hours doing child care per week. In 2011, mothers spent 21.4 hours doing paid work, 17.8 hours doing housework, and 13.5 hours doing child care per week. In 1975, fathers spent 41.4 hours doing paid work, 6.0 hours doing housework, and 2.6 hours doing child care per week. In 2011, fathers spent 37.1 hours doing paid work, 9.8 hours doing housework, and 7.3 hours doing child care per week (103)more
April 1, 2017, 11:03 p.m.
Countries: Niger
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"The underground water is often over thirty meters deep. Traditionally it is the women who draw the water with their bare hands. Each day, they fetch tens of liters needed for their household. It is back breaking work. On the other hand, men are responsible for collecting water for the livestock. The donkeys used to carry out this work belong to them exclusively" (1) .
Feb. 17, 2017, 11:49 a.m.
Countries: Ecuador
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"In March the Inter-American Development Bank reported the average income of women was 14 percent lower than that of men, although other studies indicated that women represented 55.5 percent of the university population and worked an average of 17 hours more per week" (44).
Feb. 9, 2017, 4:56 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"Evidence from the Young Lives project in Ethiopia suggests that 52% of rural girls between five and eight years old are engaged in care work compared to 38% of rural boys - and that one-quarter of these young girls spend three or more hours daily on unpaid care" (para 7).
Feb. 1, 2017, 6:40 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"In 2012, the last time the government surveyed its citizens about their occupation, an astonishing 205 million women between the ages of 15 and 60 responded 'attending to domestic duties'” (para 4). This indicates a rigid gender division of labor in this society (KH- CODER COMMENT).
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:38 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: LRCM-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1

"Mamata, married as child, had no idea what to expect. She was looking forward to the wedding and wearing her gold embroidered sari and the music of the event, but was completely unprepared for what lay in store. Her husband would beat her, drink, have sex when he liked. She did everything in the household and raised two sons. When he died, she was shunned by society. Her life was effectively over at the age of 17. Her father said that it is better to have a husband that beat her than a widow for a daughter. It is just the way it is there. You are born in your ...more
Dec. 2, 2016, 5:11 p.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"On average a rural woman was 51 years old and spent on average 39 hours per week working" (49)
Dec. 2, 2016, 5:11 p.m.
Countries: Slovenia
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1

"The study showed that daily housework is done predominantly by women (in more than two thirds of cases, it is mostly done by women) – women prepare meals, do the washing up or load the dishwasher, do the laundry, clean the house and iron much more frequently than men or couples together. The more demanding chores are distributed more equally: for the most part men, do small repairs in the apartment or house, maintain outdoor areas and look after the car; gardening is done equally by both partners; in nearly two thirds of cases, couples decide on home interior design and maintenance and/or house construction or renovation together; where this ...more
Nov. 18, 2016, 5 p.m.
Countries: D R Congo
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"But as they [victims of rape] live day to day, as they must work the land to provide food for their families, they believe that it is better to keep their silence instead of walking all this distance to report the crime and perpetrator of the sex violence". This was said by a woman at 6:15 of the video (ENB-Coder Comment)."In the DRC the woman is the one who keeps the family…Sometimes she has to leave the village…and then this whole family is suffering because the woman is the one who supports the whole household." This was said by a woman at 6:30 of the video (ENB-Coder Comment)."The men could ...more
Nov. 11, 2016, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"[Peninnah] Tombo's childhood was the typical life of a young member of the semi-nomadic cattle-herding tribe of central and southern Kenya. By age 4, she was taking care of her father's cows"(para 5)."For many Masai men, who are used to being served, even down to the heavy buckets of warm bathwater their wives lug for them to wash in, change is not just unthinkable.To them, the women such as Tombo have no right to speak, or attack Masai culture"(para 29)."A wife cooks, cleans, looks after the children, washes the clothes, carries water, milks the cows and cares for the other animals. Younger wives are bossed and bullied by senior wives. ...more
Aug. 21, 2016, 3:30 p.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

"Colonel Mirakai, who supports having more policewomen, sighed. 'The police commanders I work with say: ‘We don’t need them to work with us until noon and go home; instead of female police, send us male police,’' he said, alluding to the reality that many women have to leave work early to care for their families" (Para 15). "Ms. Aziza’s family obligations are common among women in the police force, and often limit what they can accomplish on the job. 'They have to look after their children, cook, make dinner, clean; they have to leave early to take care of family matters,' said Col. Ali Akbar Mahmoudi, the former police chief ...more
July 19, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Panama
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

According to Annex 3: Right at Work: Laws, Policies and Working Conditions, during 2011 females spent 288 minutes per day on unpaid care and domestic work while males spent 119 minutes per day. On the other hand females spent 199 minutes per day on paid work while males spent 356 minutes per day (273).
July 19, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

According to Annex 3: Right at Work: Laws, Policies and Working Conditions, during 2012 females spent 216 minutes per day on unpaid care and domestic work while males spent 84 minutes per day. On the other hand females spent 312 minutes per day on paid work while males spent 414 minutes per day (275).
July 19, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: United Kingdom
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

According to Annex 3: Right at Work: Laws, Policies and Working Conditions, during 2005 females spent 258 minutes per day on unpaid care and domestic work while males spent 154 minutes per day. On the other hand females spent 195 minutes per day on paid work while males spent 280 minutes per day (271).
July 19, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Lithuania
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

According to Annex 3: Right at Work: Laws, Policies and Working Conditions, during 2003 females spent 269 minutes per day on unpaid care and domestic work while males spent 129 minutes per day. On the other hand females spent 211 minutes per day on paid work while males spent 284 minutes per day (269).
July 19, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Denmark
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

According to Annex 3: Right at Work: Laws, Policies and Working Conditions, during 2001 females spent 243 minutes per day on unpaid care and domestic work while males spent 186 minutes per day. On the other hand females spent 147 minutes per day on paid work while males spent 211 minutes per day (269).
July 19, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: France
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

According to Annex 3: Right at Work: Laws, Policies and Working Conditions, during 2009 females spent 233 minutes per day on unpaid care and domestic work while males spent 143 minutes per day. On the other hand females spent 116 minutes per day on paid work while males spent 173 minutes per day (269).
July 19, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Spain
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

According to Annex 3: Right at Work: Laws, Policies and Working Conditions, during 2009-10 females spent 258 minutes per day on unpaid care and domestic work while males spent 154 minutes per day. On the other hand females spent 195 minutes per day on paid work while males spent 280 minutes per day (271).
July 19, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

According to Annex 3: Right at Work: Laws, Policies and Working Conditions, during 2009 females spent 227 minutes per day on unpaid care and domestic work while males spent 45 minutes per day. On the other hand females spent 167 minutes per day on paid work while males spent 282 minutes per day (271).
July 19, 2016, 9:15 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: DLB-DATA-1

According to Annex 3: Right at Work: Laws, Policies and Working Conditions, during 2006 females spent 253 minutes per day on unpaid care and domestic work while males spent 75 minutes per day. On the other hand females spent 251 minutes per day on paid work while males spent 345 minutes per day (277).