The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for DMW-PRACTICE-1

Sept. 11, 2017, 6:36 a.m.
Countries: Afghanistan
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Afghan women’s entrance into adulthood is not acknowledged, in part because female sexuality remains off-limits. Girls and teens are scared as changes occur in their bodies. They are ignorant and confused about how to cope. Unspoken expectations also haunt them. They must stop being children, and begin behaving like adults. For females, this means being submissive and acting with humility, especially towards men" (para 4).
Sept. 8, 2017, 9:20 a.m.
Countries: India
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"She pegs the lack of willingness [of men] to share the burden of contraception on a misplaced sense of masculinity" (para 5). "'For men, concerns of losing sexual potency and physical vigour make them unwilling to discuss vasectomy,' says Harish Chandra Reddy, health official in Ranga Reddy district" (para 8). "In rural India, women are against their husbands undergoing vasectomies fearing it may rob the family of its means of earnings and cast aspersions on them should pregnancy ensue after vasectomy" (para 12).
Sept. 1, 2017, 1:17 p.m.
Countries: Morocco
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

“Women are sold the lie that in order to enter paradise they must be veiled and obey men, says Zioual. ‘Most Moroccan women … depend on their husband so they tend to obey this culture that tells them not to ask for anything, whether it is schools, hospitals or roads. They are told if they are you are calm and placid they will go to paradise’” (para 26).
Aug. 31, 2017, 10:16 a.m.
Countries: Dominican Republic
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"81% of girls said they preferred men that were five years older, as they associated their age with greater life experience, responsibility, sexual experience and economic independence. On the other hand, 39% of men said they preferred girls under the age of 18 because they found them more 'obedient' and 'adaptable'" (para 6-7). "Girls in the Dominican Republic grow up learning that marriage and motherhood is how you gain respect in society. They expect to marry, and believe that their role is to serve their husbands. Many girls saw marriage as a form of emancipation and a way into adulthood" (para 10).
Aug. 30, 2017, 2:41 p.m.
Countries: Bangladesh
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"For Hindus, marriage is full of rituals. The first of these symbolizes her future as a married woman. Beezly grimaces as the bangles are forced over her wrist – binding her to her future husband – forever. Then, Beezly’s school uniform is traded in for her first sari. This marks her as a woman, even though she’s just a young girl. The last step is to unbraid her hair and tie it in a traditional knot – the symbol of a Bengali bride. Her transformation is complete" (1). This is a quote from the narrator at 2:55 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT). "She’s playing the role that’s expected of her in ...more
Aug. 28, 2017, 4:45 p.m.
Countries: Solomon Islands
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"One factor that could significantly impact GDP is the restructuring of the division of labor in the country’s unpaid care economy. According to the Asian Development Bank, 'women spend twice as much time on household work and four times more on childcare' – neither of which is accounted for in the calculation of GDP. Likewise, women’s overrepresentation in subsistence work inhibits their ability to contribute significantly to GDP"(para 5)
Aug. 24, 2017, 3:28 p.m.
Countries: Burma/Myanmar
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

“Buddhist-majority Burma is a socially conservative country, where gender stereotypes are deeply entrenched and sex remains a taboo topic. The Burmese language has no word for female genitalia and any garments worn on a woman's lower half are considered unclean, meaning they must be washed separately from men's clothes” (para 6-7).
Aug. 23, 2017, 9:29 p.m.
Countries: Tanzania
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

“From a very young age, girls in some regions are raised to perform traditional gender roles as mothers, wives and caregivers. As a result, they often have limited economic value to the household, except the bride price they bring when they marry. Boys, on the other hand are seen as an investment in the family’s future” (para 6).
Aug. 15, 2017, 7:56 p.m.
Countries: Kenya
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"In the Maasai community, as soon as a girl undergoes circumcision, she is considered a woman and, typically, no longer has to listen to her parents. She is now ready for marriage, no matter her age. As she is now a woman, she is also expected to leave school, which leads to fewer opportunities for girls and creates major barriers to gender equity"(para 9)."The ceremony takes four days. On the final day, the girls line up and sing traditional songs at sunrise. The rite ends with the girls walking through a ceremonial arch formed by tribal elders as the surrounding community welcomes them as women. Elderly women who formerly performed ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:55 p.m.
Countries: Nepal
Variables: DLB-DATA-1, DMW-PRACTICE-1

At 0:23 the son says his mother takes care of the children as well as the household (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 9, 2017, 8:04 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"TBILISI, Georgia – The camera zooms in, panning across a marble mantle covered with family photos of three young boys and their happy, smiling parents, then stops on what studies have shown is a statistically uncommon sight in Georgia: A father – in this case Zviad Kvaratskhelia, best-selling author and publisher – sitting in his living room, spending the day alone with his kids – Nikoloz, age 5, Demetre, 3, and Alexandre, 1"(para 1)."'I had never spent time alone with my kids before. They found it bizarre at first to see me changing diapers and cooking for them,' says Zviad. 'But we mustn’t take our families for granted. We must ...more
Aug. 9, 2017, 5:34 p.m.
Countries: India
Variables: CL-PRACTICE-1, DLB-DATA-1, DMW-PRACTICE-1

"In every field my parents are different from others. Some people think that girls should not play and that they are meant merely to carry out kitchen duties". This statement was made at 1:38 by a 14 year old girl Saima (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 8, 2017, 5:51 p.m.
Countries: Belgium, Nepal
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"The education of mothers or parents has also been linked to their children eating more nutritious and diverse diets: see, for example, Khanal et al. (2013) on Nepalese infants or Vereecken et al. (2004) on Flemish preschoolers"(59). This could possibly be due to mothers doing the meal preparation (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 8, 2017, 5:49 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Public campaigns and education, including the large-scale training of women in the preparation of traditional low-fat, high-vegetable meals, has led to Korean diets that resulted in the consumption of more of these meals than might be predicted, given the country’s relatively high average incomes"(14).As the campaign focused on women, it is probable that women are usually primarily responsible for meal preparation (ENB-Coder Comment)
Aug. 7, 2017, 4:40 p.m.
Countries: Japan
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"According to one critic, for example, Japan’s 'gendered status quo' continues to 'allocate productive roles to men and reproductive roles to women.' Consequently, despite having one of the most liberal paid parental leave policies worldwide, only 2 percent of fathers take any of their leave, leaving the burden of childcare to fall on the mother. Perhaps not surprisingly then, 68 percent of mothers in Japan quit their jobs upon marriage or childbirth. Among the women that do remain economically active, the majority seek part-time or irregular employment"(para 5)
Aug. 3, 2017, 4:09 p.m.
Countries: Kyrgyzstan
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Intensive Qur’anic studies are just one element in the strict curriculum of this all-girls boarding school in Bishkek. It’s meant to prepare each of these girls to be married to a Muslim man" (1). This is a quote by the narrator at :02 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT). "'We admit girls who have completed nine years of [primary] schooling. So they get a special education here. We teach them religion, tailoring, and cooking skills'" (1). This is a quote from the executive secretary of a boarding school designed to prepare girls to marry Muslim men at :14 (TPJ - CODER COMMENT). "'Their husbands later say that they cook well. They are ...more
July 31, 2017, 3:24 p.m.
Countries: Georgia
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1, AFE-PRACTICE-1

"After marriage, many of these girls stop going to school because it is thought that education isn’t needed for someone whose primary duties in life include bearing children and keeping house" (para 3).
July 26, 2017, 1:03 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"One the one hand, there are social drivers like the male-dominated atmosphere in Turkey where girls and women are only seen as wife and mothers" (para 4). "After one of the awareness-meetings, a woman said: 'We used to believe that we came into the world to give birth, cook, wait for our husbands at home, wait for them to give us money and we thought it's our destiny. But from today on, I won't believe that that is true'" (para 9).
July 19, 2017, 12:14 p.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"He explained that when girls become fertile, they receive a traditional education on topics including marriage, sex and how to take care of their husbands once they get married" (para 13).
June 29, 2017, 1:27 p.m.
Countries: Ethiopia
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"A girl's eagerness to tolerate pain is also seen as an indication of her emotional maturity and willingness to bear children, Mr Lafforgue said after spending time with the tribe" (para 8).
June 22, 2017, 10:06 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"‘It’s easy to talk to these [underage] girls,’ said one man in his 30s who was sitting at a wooden school desk in AKB High School, a cafe in Akihabara, a part of Tokyo known for its subcultures. A 17-year-old girl in a school uniform brought the man and his colleague, both of whom declined to give their names, beers and chitchat. ‘We actually find regular bars uninteresting these days,’ he said. ‘I got tired of regular bars with old women’" (p 4-5). While this is not necessarily a definition of manhood, it feels important to note that men are not taught to practice conversational skills or place importance on ...more
June 22, 2017, 10:06 a.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"[Speaking about the 'high school dating' industry] Kazue Muta, a professor of sociology and gender studies at Osaka University, said the element of taboo makes girls in school uniforms sexually attractive to men. ‘Japan is a patriarchal society, and it has this mentality that the young and seemingly innocent are valuable and more alluring,’ she said" (p 11)
June 12, 2017, 1:08 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Nearly 10,000 people, aged between 18 and 59, were questioned with a majority of the men supporting a range of traditional and inequitable attitudes toward women, including a belief that they are not fit to be leaders, should not work outside the home, and that it is more important to educate boys than girls. Participants were given a ranking on the Gender Equitable Men (GEM) scale, which ranges from 0 (the least equitable views) to 3 (the most equitable). Survey...respondents in Lebanon reported the highest [scores]. In Lebanon, younger men’s views on gender were more equitable than those held by older men. But the youngest – and most progressive – ...more
June 12, 2017, 1:04 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DV-PRACTICE-2, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2, DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Nearly 10,000 people, aged between 18 and 59, were questioned with a majority of the men supporting a range of traditional and inequitable attitudes toward women, including a belief that they are not fit to be leaders, should not work outside the home, and that it is more important to educate boys than girls...In Egypt, more than 90% of men agreed with the statement that ‘a man should have the final word about decision in the home’. Although a majority – 58.5% – of women also agreed. More than half of the Egyptian men surveyed agreed that ‘there are times when a woman deserves to be beaten’, compared with less ...more
June 12, 2017, 12:57 p.m.
Countries: Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Male attitudes towards the role of women in the workplace and at home, and of their participation in public life, were stereotypically sexist in the study of views in Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco and Palestine. Nearly 10,000 people, aged between 18 and 59, were questioned with a majority of the men supporting a range of traditional and inequitable attitudes toward women, including a belief that they are not fit to be leaders, should not work outside the home, and that it is more important to educate boys than girls. The younger women surveyed showed a consistent desire for greater gender equality, according to the research undertaken by the International Men and ...more
June 8, 2017, 2:15 p.m.
Countries: Turkey
Variables: IIP-PRACTICE-1, ATFPA-PRACTICE-2, DMW-PRACTICE-1

"In 2014, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said that a woman’s natural role is as a mother and argued that women are not equal to men. Earlier that year, one of Mr. Erdogan’s deputy prime ministers said that women should not laugh loudly in public" (p 22)
April 18, 2017, 1:24 p.m.
Countries: South Korea
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"Online, men have attacked Ms. Park and Ms. Choi by invoking an old Korean diatribe against assertive women: 'If a hen crows, the household collapses'" (para 19).
March 10, 2017, 12:59 p.m.
Countries: Russia
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"The [Chechyan] bride must keep her mouth shut because verbosity is seen as a sign of empty-headedness and immodesty. She can only offer the guests a drink of water and wish them all good health" (para 14).
Feb. 23, 2017, 9:45 a.m.
Countries: Equatorial Guinea
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"The culture was conservative and maintained a societal bias against women. Custom confined women in rural areas largely to traditional roles" (23).
Feb. 7, 2017, 8:50 p.m.
Countries: Mozambique
Variables: DMW-PRACTICE-1

"In a meeting with Shaista de Araujo, a women’s rights activist based in Maputo she tells me that the biggest problem is that Mozambique is a patriarchal society and girls are expected to be submissive. They are less valued which inevitably leads to abuse" (para 14).