The most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of
women in the world.

Latest items for DTCP-PRACTICE-1

Sept. 15, 2017, 11:02 p.m.
Countries: United States
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"With the exception of a very popular Netflix show, the plight of women in prison continues to be overlooked and misunderstood, despite women making up the fastest growing population in US prisons today. Our mothers, sisters, aunts, neighbors, and friends make up the more than one million women currently under the supervision of the criminal justice system in the United States. Life for women behind bars is far from easy, especially when women face serious gender-specific issues that men simply do not"(para 1-2)."Instead of focusing on services to help women deal with the issues of livelihood and survival that landed them behind bars in the first place, we are incarcerating ...more
Sept. 14, 2017, 10:37 p.m.
Countries: Brazil
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"The lead investigator on the case [a gang rape of a 16 year old girl] was removed over the weekend amid criticisms of bias against the victim. The case is now being handled by the police unit for crimes against minors and the state's department of social services" (para 15)
Sept. 12, 2017, 10:04 a.m.
Countries: Iran
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"The organization’s [Amnesty International] research reveals that since January 2016 more than a dozen women’s rights activists in Tehran have been summoned for long, intensive interrogations by the Revolutionary Guards, and threatened with imprisonment on national security-related charges. Many had been involved in a campaign launched in October 2015, which advocated for increased representation of women in Iran’s February 2016 parliamentary election. 'It is utterly shameful that the Iranian authorities are treating peaceful activists who seek women’s equal participation in decision-making bodies as enemies of the state. Speaking up for women’s equality is not a crime. We are calling for an immediate end to this heightened harassment and intimidation, which ...more
Sept. 1, 2017, 11:24 a.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1, DTCP-LAW-1

“The 16-year-old was kidnapped from her home near Abbottabad, in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and put inside a vehicle that was set alight, police said. … Police say the victim's mother and the leader of the local council, or jirga, are among several people arrested. The killing has been linked to orders given last week by the jirga, a traditional assembly of elders, in Makol village, Pakistan's Dawn newspaper reported. According to police, the 15-member jirga had ordered the girl, named as Amber, to be killed and set alight as punishment for helping her friend to marry of her own free will” (para 1-5).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:31 a.m.
Countries: Peru
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

“A girl in Lima expressed that police often did not consider situations that made girls uncomfortable to be a real priority for them, saying ‘I called the police once because there was a man who was causing a commotion, he was drunk … but the police said no, is he breaking windows, is he destroying homes? If he is not doing that you cannot call them because they won’t do anything.’ When asked if she trusted the police, one girl in Lima said ‘sometimes yes, sometimes not because it sometimes turns out that some policemen are corrupt’” (26).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:29 a.m.
Countries: Uganda
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

“In Kampala, girls commented that in areas with security guards and police, they could not always trust them because they sometimes cause harm to girls, and they sometimes report to duty intoxicated” (26). “The girls’ maps in … Kampala included greater police presence than on the boys’ maps. When asked about this, the adolescent boys in Kampala pointed to a different form of gender discrimination and explained that they felt that the police often unnecessarily targeted them, so for them, the police represented a source of insecurity and they chose to remove police posts from their ideal city maps” (32).
Aug. 31, 2017, 11:28 a.m.
Countries: Vietnam
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

“In Hanoi, girls reported that they ‘seldom’ (36%) or ‘rarely’ (23%) had access to emergency services – notably the police” (21).
June 10, 2017, 2:06 p.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"In their home outside Toronto, John Fox shared pictures of his daughter Cheyenne. A teenager giggling as the family cleared snow away; a young mother cradling a newborn baby son. John said Cheyenne had lots of friends at school in Thunder Bay, was bubbly and sociable. But when she moved to Toronto, her life was troubled. He says she was assaulted, became homeless, and got involved in sex work to survive. Cheyenne's body was found in a Toronto suburb in 2013. The 20-year-old had fallen from an apartment block. But for father and brother the police verdict, that Cheyenne committed suicide, just does not seem possible. ‘I think they disregarded ...more
June 10, 2017, 2:06 p.m.
Countries: Canada
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"On top of frustrations over unsolved crimes, People & Power heard further disturbing claims about the use of excessive force in Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) dealings with aboriginal people in this province, and a fractured relationship with indigenous communities. One activist told us: ‘I've had so many women say to me – why would I ever call the RCMP?’" (p 28-29)
June 5, 2017, 6 p.m.
Countries: Lebanon
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"'[Syrian women who are forced into prostitution and are caught] may also face sexual abuse in police stations where they usually cannot access lawyers. They also could face problems because of their residency status'. According to HRW, up to 75 women were released after a recent police raid of one 'super nightclub' who had been held in abusive conditions, 'forced to work as prostitutes', were regularly beaten and had their identification documents and phones taken away" (p 26-27)
April 21, 2017, 10:33 a.m.
Countries: Netherlands
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"In Sint Maarten and Curacao, former ministers, current and former members of parliament, and other public figures were publicly accused of corruption, illegal activities, ties to human trafficking and forced prostitution, and other abuses of power" (11).
April 6, 2017, 11:13 a.m.
Countries: Libya
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Treatment varied from facility to facility and typically was worst at the time of arrest. Reported abuses included beatings with belts, sticks, hoses, and rifles; administration of electric shocks; burns inflicted by boiling water, heated metal, or cigarettes; mock executions; suspension from metal bars; and rape" (5).
March 24, 2017, 1:11 p.m.
Countries: Haiti
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Female inmates in coed prisons received proportionately more space in their cells than their male counterparts, but women at the Petionville women’s prison, like men at mixedgender prison facilities, had less than 11 square feet of cell space per person. Female prisoners also appreciated a better quality of life than did their male counterparts due to their smaller numbers, which wardens suggested was a contributing factor to their ease of control. Access to water and adequate plumbing was a problem at the women’s prison, which had no flushing toilets, and where one pit latrine served 319 inmates" (4-5).
March 20, 2017, 12:04 p.m.
Countries: Guyana
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"It was reported in April, however, that a 15-year-old girl was ordered by the court to be placed in the NOC, but instead she was held for weeks in a detention center at a police station and was subsequently sexually assaulted by a male constable" (2).
March 16, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Countries: Guinea
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Impunity persisted for grave abuses perpetrated by state actors in years past, including security force killings of at least 150 opposition demonstrators and the rape of more than 100 women and girls in the 2009 stadium massacre" (2). "According to NGOs, during the political violence in 2013, OPJs abused prisoners to intimidate protesters. Guards tortured, beat, raped, and otherwise abused detainees, including children. Guards coerced some women into exchanging sex for better treatment" (3). "Men, women, and children were intermingled at gendarmerie detention centers, sometimes with women sleeping in hallways outside the prison cells" (4).
March 14, 2017, 3:23 p.m.
Countries: Guatemala
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Conditions for male and female prisoners were usually comparable throughout the country. Media and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) noted that female and juvenile inmates faced continuing physical and sexual abuse. Female inmates reported unnecessary body searches and verbal abuse by prison guards. Children below age three could live in prison with their mothers, although the penitentiary system provided inadequate food for young children, and many suffered from illness" (3-4).
March 9, 2017, 1:16 p.m.
Countries: Haiti
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Interviewees reported that many women do not report abuse to police, in part because they fear abuse or discriminatory treatment at the hands of the police.... The abusive and discriminatory behaviors reported of some police officers when they receive complainants at the station have retraumatizing and dissuasive effects on victims reporting sexual violence" (16). "The HNP recently appointed a National Coordinator for Women’s Affairs to handle both internal issues related to women in the police, as well as external issues related to responding to crimes against women.89 While this is a positive step, at the time of the interview, the Coordinator had no office or computer and was working out ...more
March 7, 2017, 4:15 p.m.
Countries: Pakistan
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"'When a woman went to a police station after being tortured by her husband, the police would ask her to go back to her house and settle the issue on her own since it was a personal matter,' says Sadia Sohail Rana of Pakistan Tehrik e Insaf, who is a member of the Punjab Assembly. In rape cases, Rana says women face severe humiliation at police stations, where officials put forth all sorts of 'bizarre questions'. Rape cases also require a medical examination to be done within 72 hours— but since this procedure is neither followed nor addressed by enforcement agencies, the lack of physical evidence often makes a survivor’s ...more
Feb. 23, 2017, 9:45 a.m.
Countries: Equatorial Guinea
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Security forces sexually assaulted and beat women, including at checkpoints, and senior government officials were unwilling to take steps to address such violence" (3). "In the Guantanamo Detention Center, located inside the Ministry of Interior compound, authorities held men, women, and children together" (4).
Feb. 23, 2017, 9:40 a.m.
Countries: El Salvador
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"A separate women’s prison in Ilopango was generally clean and allowed inmates’ children under age five to stay with their mothers" (4).
Feb. 17, 2017, 11:49 a.m.
Countries: Ecuador
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Indigenous women, including pregnant women, reported cases of physical abuse, threats, and sexual harassment during detention" (5).
Feb. 15, 2017, 2:46 p.m.
Countries: Djibouti
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Conditions of detention for women were similar to those of men, although less crowded. There were generally fewer than 30 juvenile prisoners. Authorities allowed young children of female prisoners to stay with their mothers" (3).
Feb. 15, 2017, 2:34 p.m.
Countries: Dominican Republic
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Some prisons remained effectively outside the control of authorities, and there were allegations of drug and arms trafficking, prostitution, and sexual abuse within prisons" (4).
Feb. 8, 2017, 5:19 p.m.
Countries: Cuba
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Generally, women reported the same prison conditions as men, including inadequate medical care. Women also reported lack of access to feminine hygiene products and inadequate prenatal care" (3).
Feb. 3, 2017, 5:50 p.m.
Countries: Colombia
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"During the year the government worked to provide staff gynecologists at women’s prisons. As of September 21, there were gynecologists on the medical staffs of the women’s prisons in Bucaramanga, Ibague, and Jamundi, and inmates at prisons elsewhere in the country had access to outside gynecologists" (8).
Jan. 31, 2017, 11:27 a.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"A January Amnesty International Report said that more needed to be done to fight against mob attacks, torture in custody, and domestic violence against women, and that reforms so far were piecemeal" (para 12).
Jan. 26, 2017, 3:58 p.m.
Countries: Mexico
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"'In Edomex, police dig into people's personal lives, saying that the victims wore provocative clothes, or didn't 'satisfy' her husband, or dealt drugs,' Estrada said. 'I am sick of hearing these policemen accuse women of their own murders, when their approach to domestic violence is to wait 72 hours after an assault before checking in again'... Mariana's mother, Guadalupe, described the same hallmarks of police incompetence and victim-blaming in the case of her daughter. 'The first questions police asked when we reported Mariana's disappearance concerned her behaviour,' she told Al Jazeera. 'A few weeks after she vanished, a policeman texted me from Veracruz to say he'd heard she was pregnant ...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:47 p.m.
Countries: Saudi Arabia
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Under Saudi law, women require the permission of a male guardian to travel, marry, or exit prison and it may be needed to be granted employment or access to healthcare. A guardian is typically a woman’s father or her husband if she is married; a widow may have to seek permission from her son if she has no other men of age in her life" (para 4-5). The need for a man's permission to exit prisons could lead to greater mistreatement, longer stays, and other differences based on gender (KH- CODER COMMENT). "Saudi Arabia’s government agreed to abolish the guardianship system twice – in 2009 and 2013 – after a ...more
Jan. 26, 2017, 2:43 p.m.
Countries: Egypt
Variables: LRW-DATA-1, SEGI-PRACTICE-2, DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"However, these peaceful protests were faced by various forms of violence, most obviously the exposure to sexual violence to the extent of detention and arbitrary murder by police forces. And with different political managements of transitional periods, starting from the period of Mubarak's rule followed by the military council then the Muslim Brotherhood until the current government, and according to the documentation of feminist groups and organizations, there were more than 250 cases of sexual assault during the broad popular protests, which signifies a systematic violation against women during their political participation of their right to peaceful demonstration" (1-2).
Jan. 24, 2017, 11:25 a.m.
Countries: Brunei
Variables: DTCP-PRACTICE-1

"Women were housed in separate facilities from men, as were inmates awaiting trial. Prison conditions did not vary by gender, except that women of all religions were required to wear head coverings (hijab)" (2). "A prisoner may make a complaint to a visiting judge, the superintendent, the officer in charge, and, in the case of female prisoners, the matron in charge" (3).